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Tomahawkin:
The C/D road on 285 west from 400 to Roswell Road will open in a week. This is great because the traffic from that ramp and interchange is so antiquated that the traffic always backs up onto 285 all the time, even on the weekends

Tom958:
On Sunday afternoon, I investigated the 285-400 interchange after the latest round of ramp changes, including the opening of the mile-and-a-half-long westbound CD and offramp to Roswell  Road. The signage situation is inherently difficult but made worse by indifference to detail, such as having an unneeded trailblazer block the view of the undersized 3/4 mile sign for the Peachtree Dunwoody Road exit.

The current configuration crams three offramps to four destinations right on top of each other, as this GDOT masterpiece demonstrates:



This one went up a couple of weeks ago, when the 400 offramps were reconfigured but before the new Roswell Road exit was opened, with the Roswell Road exit being 1 3/4 miles out instead of 1/2. As wordy as it is, it would've been a good idea to eliminate the useless NEXT 4 EXITS tab, especially since this is an overlay on a sign for three destinations. But noooo. As it stands, though, it's essentially moot: the scene there is so chaotic that I missed it on my first pass even knowing it was there! That said, maybe it'll be useful in slow-moving rush hour traffic.

This master-blaster overhead is unfortunately located just beyond and is obstructed by the Perimeter Center Parkway bridge, which impedes the already-difficult task of interpreting it. It also introduces exits 27A and 27B, replacing exit 27 for both directions.



To me, the most objectionable aspect of this assembly is the unfortunate placement of the new EXIT ONLY arrow for the Roswell Road-400 south exit. The new offramp leaves 285 as a single lane, then widens to two lanes before splitting. I think it would've been possible to stripe the offramp for two lanes with an option lane and thereby provide two arrows, one white and one black, one for each destination, with each directly over the appropriate lanes instead of confusingly far off as the lone arrow is now. Yes, I know that having a white down arrow over an option lane is a no-no per the MUTCD, but this assembly's previous incarnation had one, so drivers would be familiar with it. That's just me, though.

In case you haven't seen them yet, navigation here is also aided by these beautiful pavement shields, which are sure to become an Atlanta landmark.





I've stated repeatedly that the completed project will restripe the 285 mainline back to eight lanes from ten. With this recent change, the process has started: westbound 285 is now only four lanes from the Medusa split to just before Roswell Road. Speaking of which: this sign was still in service when I was there on Sunday afternoon even though that offramp is gone, never to return. Hopefully they'll get around to tarping it over before too long. I doubt that they'll bother taking it down until they demolish the bridge.

Tom958:
It wasn't that long ago that GDOT announced that the 285-400 interchange project would be substantially complete by the end of 2021. I found this assertion to be absurd given that the new design carries both northbound and southbound 400 under 285 instead of just northbound, thereby requiring replacement in situ of the two bridges carrying 285 over 400. I thought that temporary detour bridges would have to be constructed, that that couldn't be done until the existing southbound 400 bridge was demolished, after southbound 400 was rerouted via the new southbound CD roads. However, I just now stumbled upon this wonderful video from May of 2019 showing the 285 mainline narrowed to six lanes and crammed onto the southern, eastbound existing bridge while the westbound bridge is being replaced-- all while the original southbound 400 bridge is still in use!

Another possibility could be that it's been decided to narrow the new southbound 400 roadway to two lanes if that would make it possible to cram it under the existing bridges.

We'll see, I guess.

Tomahawkin:
Great assessments on that interchange progress. You can take it to the Bank that no way this interchange is completed by the end of the year, considering that they are transforming the Abernathy interchange into a DDI, also the permanent overhead sign bridges need to be installed as well as overhead lighting (hopefully l).

architect77:

--- Quote from: Tom958 on August 03, 2021, 05:25:44 AM ---On Sunday afternoon, I investigated the 285-400 interchange after the latest round of ramp changes, including the opening of the mile-and-a-half-long westbound CD and offramp to Roswell  Road. The signage situation is inherently difficult but made worse by indifference to detail, such as having an unneeded trailblazer block the view of the undersized 3/4 mile sign for the Peachtree Dunwoody Road exit.

The current configuration crams three offramps to four destinations right on top of each other, as this GDOT masterpiece demonstrates:



This one went up a couple of weeks ago, when the 400 offramps were reconfigured but before the new Roswell Road exit was opened, with the Roswell Road exit being 1 3/4 miles out instead of 1/2. As wordy as it is, it would've been a good idea to eliminate the useless NEXT 4 EXITS tab, especially since this is an overlay on a sign for three destinations. But noooo. As it stands, though, it's essentially moot: the scene there is so chaotic that I missed it on my first pass even knowing it was there! That said, maybe it'll be useful in slow-moving rush hour traffic.

This master-blaster overhead is unfortunately located just beyond and is obstructed by the Perimeter Center Parkway bridge, which impedes the already-difficult task of interpreting it. It also introduces exits 27A and 27B, replacing exit 27 for both directions.



To me, the most objectionable aspect of this assembly is the unfortunate placement of the new EXIT ONLY arrow for the Roswell Road-400 south exit. The new offramp leaves 285 as a single lane, then widens to two lanes before splitting. I think it would've been possible to stripe the offramp for two lanes with an option lane and thereby provide two arrows, one white and one black, one for each destination, with each directly over the appropriate lanes instead of confusingly far off as the lone arrow is now. Yes, I know that having a white down arrow over an option lane is a no-no per the MUTCD, but this assembly's previous incarnation had one, so drivers would be familiar with it. That's just me, though.

In case you haven't seen them yet, navigation here is also aided by these beautiful pavement shields, which are sure to become an Atlanta landmark.





I've stated repeatedly that the completed project will restripe the 285 mainline back to eight lanes from ten. With this recent change, the process has started: westbound 285 is now only four lanes from the Medusa split to just before Roswell Road. Speaking of which: this sign was still in service when I was there on Sunday afternoon even though that offramp is gone, never to return. Hopefully they'll get around to tarping it over before too long. I doubt that they'll bother taking it down until they demolish the bridge.



--- End quote ---

So of course all of these signs are temporary and sloppiness has always been allowed in construction zones. But using the US shield shape for i-285 markings is unbelievable even if only temporary.

Regarding those painted shields on the pavement, I'm ok with them and believe they are helpful, but on a fast-moving highway I've always wondered if they should be split apart (i.e. one shield sliced horizontally in the 3 or 4 pieces) and arranged with spacing so that you have more time to see the shield and interpret the message.

Some of you might remember that they used to reverse the word order painted on high speed roads so that "LANE END 1000 FT"  would be painted on the roadway in the opposite order of a top to bottom stack of words. it looked funny but was done in hopes you'd get the message while moving at high speed. The shields on the pavement as they are now have come and gone almost too quickly to read. You rely on the repeated markings to understand.


I'm still confounded about how GDOT never, ever installs gantries to be level and not lean downward to the left or the right. It's as if it's mandated to not be visually level.

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