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Why is NCDOT interested in local roads?

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Alex4897:

--- Quote from: elsmere241 on October 09, 2022, 06:44:43 PM ---
--- Quote from: wriddle082 on October 09, 2022, 12:25:15 PM ---The idea of maintenance of most routes within a state buy a single state DOT goes back to the Great Depression.  There are 5 states that currently do this: South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania.  Of these, many county or municipal governments in SC have asked the state to relinquish secondary road maintenance to them, as SCDOT has not been properly maintaining them.  Spartanburg County is a notable example, as it is one of the largest (size wise).  Not sure if local governments in the other four states have similarly offered to take their roads back.


--- End quote ---

Delaware too.  I can remember when most rural roads just had county numbers and not names.  I know New Castle County made an effort to name roads in the mid-1980s (and assign street addresses where there was rural route and box).

--- End quote ---

That's neat, I've always wondered why so many maps referred to some of those back roads by their maintenance number.

architect77:
I like the continuity in the look and appearance of roads and signage all across the State of North Carolina.

It is apparent however that they are really slacking off in necessary maintenance of damaged signs, guardrails, and most importantly not removing abundant litter everywhere.

Raleigh and Northern Wake are looking really dumpy these days, though I realize so much is going towards Southern Wake's projects.

It interesting to look at old highway maps published by the state since the 1930's. You can see the web of rural roads grow thicker and thicker.

They need to raise the gas tax I think to deal with the eroding value of what's collected currently.

NJRoadfan:

--- Quote from: elsmere241 on October 09, 2022, 06:44:43 PM ---Delaware too.  I can remember when most rural roads just had county numbers and not names.  I know New Castle County made an effort to name roads in the mid-1980s (and assign street addresses where there was rural route and box).

--- End quote ---

This was due to the coming of 911 emergency services. Many unnamed roads needed actual names and street signs so EMS could locate people. Sadly many people died when an ambulance couldn't locate where someone on an unnamed (and possibly unmapped) road lived.

jdunlop:

--- Quote from: architect77 on October 11, 2022, 01:26:42 AM ---I like the continuity in the look and appearance of roads and signage all across the State of North Carolina.

It is apparent however that they are really slacking off in necessary maintenance of damaged signs, guardrails, and most importantly not removing abundant litter everywhere.

Raleigh and Northern Wake are looking really dumpy these days, though I realize so much is going towards Southern Wake's projects.

It interesting to look at old highway maps published by the state since the 1930's. You can see the web of rural roads grow thicker and thicker.

They need to raise the gas tax I think to deal with the eroding value of what's collected currently.

--- End quote ---

How about I dump a couple of tons of trash on your front yard, and then complain that youíre not cleaning it up fast enough?

Seriously, itís taking more resources than ever to try and keep up, and itís not as high a priority as some other things.  Likewise, maintenance of some things fall behind due to increasing costs and flat revenue.

For the first time, the legislature moved revenue other than the usual sources (gas tax, etc.) to NCDOT to cover the declining revenue.  Nationally, other sources, including a possible mileage tax, are being tested.  Raising the gas tax isnít going to be enough, especially with hybrids and EVs making up a bigger share of the fleet.

architect77:

--- Quote from: jdunlop on October 12, 2022, 09:15:12 PM ---
--- Quote from: architect77 on October 11, 2022, 01:26:42 AM ---I like the continuity in the look and appearance of roads and signage all across the State of North Carolina.

It is apparent however that they are really slacking off in necessary maintenance of damaged signs, guardrails, and most importantly not removing abundant litter everywhere.

Raleigh and Northern Wake are looking really dumpy these days, though I realize so much is going towards Southern Wake's projects.

It interesting to look at old highway maps published by the state since the 1930's. You can see the web of rural roads grow thicker and thicker.

They need to raise the gas tax I think to deal with the eroding value of what's collected currently.

--- End quote ---

How about I dump a couple of tons of trash on your front yard, and then complain that youíre not cleaning it up fast enough?

Seriously, itís taking more resources than ever to try and keep up, and itís not as high a priority as some other things.  Likewise, maintenance of some things fall behind due to increasing costs and flat revenue.

For the first time, the legislature moved revenue other than the usual sources (gas tax, etc.) to NCDOT to cover the declining revenue.  Nationally, other sources, including a possible mileage tax, are being tested.  Raising the gas tax isnít going to be enough, especially with hybrids and EVs making up a bigger share of the fleet.

--- End quote ---

I would like to find out how to spearhead independent cleanups, as this holiday season visitors to Raleigh will be greeted by trash-strewn shoulders of the Beltline as well as interchanges with Capital Blvd. etc.

Though unpopular, quietly adjusting/raising the gas tax pegged to inflation is the easiest to accomplish without causing public uproar.

A yearly fee for electric vehicles is already in place but it should be raised to match the annual taxes paid by ICE existing vehicles.

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