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In 1964 Alaska asked AASHO for the US 97 designation

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usends:
Many of us were already familiar with that proposal, but on this blog post I've compiled some of the historic documentation along with a couple maps.  Interesting thing is, AASHO never formally rescinded their conditional approval.  So on the off-chance that Yukon ever relents, the door is still open for US 97 in Alaska.

The Ghostbuster:
I found the 1964 US 97 in Alaska very interesting. The route did make sense to me. According to the US 97 page on Wikipedia, in the late 1950's the Alaska International Rail and Highway Commission lobbied to designate a US 97 from Fairbanks, AK to Mexico City, MX. I'm not sure how that would have been implemented if that proposal had been approved.

SkyPesos:

--- Quote from: The Ghostbuster on February 08, 2021, 03:58:57 PM ---I found the 1964 US 97 in Alaska very interesting. The route did make sense to me. According to the US 97 page on Wikipedia, in the late 1950's the Alaska International Rail and Highway Commission lobbied to designate a US 97 from Fairbanks, AK to Mexico City, MX. I'm not sure how that would have been implemented if that proposal had been approved.

--- End quote ---
I'm interested on how US 97 can go further south than Weed, CA. Unless they move the entire route east to take over US 395, US 99 pretty much occupies the route southward. And Mexico City? There's a better chance that US 81 could make it to Mexico City in a more direct path first, not that it's saying much.

1:

--- Quote from: SkyPesos on February 08, 2021, 08:36:29 PM ---And Mexico City? There's a better chance that US 81 could make it to Mexico City in a more direct path first, not that it's saying much.

--- End quote ---

57 already goes to Mexico City.

oscar:

--- Quote from: The Ghostbuster on February 08, 2021, 03:58:57 PM ---I found the 1964 US 97 in Alaska very interesting. The route did make sense to me. According to the US 97 page on Wikipedia, in the late 1950's the Alaska International Rail and Highway Commission lobbied to designate a US 97 from Fairbanks, AK to Mexico City, MX. I'm not sure how that would have been implemented if that proposal had been approved.

--- End quote ---

AASHTO's Alaska file (small paper file, which I reviewed at its office) suggested the main push for US 97 was business interests in northern California, and central Oregon and Washington. Their idea was to establish a route including existing US 97 as the preferred way of going to Alaska. But that ship has sailed, with the Milepost guide to Alaska travel (a popular reference for people planning Alaska trips) logging a west access route starting around the north end of I-5, and an eastern route starting from the north end of I-15.

Not that I paid much attention to the Milepost recommendations, when I planned my first trip to Alaska in 1994. My starting point was the north end of US 52 in North Dakota. I returned to the U.S. near the north end of I-5, but via the Washington state ferry from Canada's Vancouver island through Washington's San Juan Islands, rather than the land border north of Bellingham WA.

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