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Do roads in Florida last longer than elsewhere?

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kernals12:
Engineers will tell you that winter is a killer for highways. Freeze thaw cycles leave potholes in asphalt and road salt corrodes the steel rebar on bridges.

Since Florida has no winters to speak of, do their roads last much longer?

Alps:
The thing is, up north, pavement mixes are designed for freeze-thaw, so a single freeze/thaw cycle down South can do as much or more damage than an entire season up North. Some parts of Florida can freeze but it's usually not a deep enough freeze to damage pavement, so yes, their pavement will last a lot longer and many of their county roads still have secondary state pavement from the 70s-80s. Bridges, however, will be worn down by the flow of traffic and so their lifespans are not significantly longer (assuming proper maintenance in all climates).

Max Rockatansky:
I wouldnít say any longer than other warm weather climates.  Arizona had some really long  lasting asphalt road surfaces in the Sonoran Desert until ADOT starting messing around with that quiet rubberized asphalt mix on the Phoenix areas freeways.  The other desert states were also similar at low elevations where the climate was stable, snow free and mostly dry. 

Something I have noticed with roads in Florida is that the asphalt aggregate is really firm compared to other states.  Iíve never been quite sure if that is due to the local materials used or if there is some sort of methodology in terms of draining water faster at play. 

kernals12:

--- Quote from: Max Rockatansky on August 19, 2021, 06:32:42 PM ---I wouldnít say any longer than other warm weather climates. Arizona had some really long  lasting asphalt road surfaces in the Sonoran Desert until ADOT starting messing around with that quiet rubberized asphalt mix on the Phoenix areas freeways.  The other desert states were also similar at low elevations where the climate was stable, snow free and mostly dry. 

Something I have noticed with roads in Florida is that the asphalt aggregate is really firm compared to other states.  Iíve never been quite sure if that is due to the local materials used or if there is some sort of methodology in terms of draining water faster at play.

--- End quote ---
But in terms of warmth, Florida is in a league of its own. Arizona does have parts that get cold. It will snow in the grand canyon.

Max Rockatansky:

--- Quote from: kernals12 on August 19, 2021, 07:56:18 PM ---
--- Quote from: Max Rockatansky on August 19, 2021, 06:32:42 PM ---I wouldnít say any longer than other warm weather climates. Arizona had some really long  lasting asphalt road surfaces in the Sonoran Desert until ADOT starting messing around with that quiet rubberized asphalt mix on the Phoenix areas freeways.  The other desert states were also similar at low elevations where the climate was stable, snow free and mostly dry. 

Something I have noticed with roads in Florida is that the asphalt aggregate is really firm compared to other states.  Iíve never been quite sure if that is due to the local materials used or if there is some sort of methodology in terms of draining water faster at play.

--- End quote ---
But in terms of warmth, Florida is in a league of its own. Arizona does have parts that get cold. It will snow in the Grand Canyon.

--- End quote ---

Hence why I specified the Sonoran Desert regions of Arizona.  The Mojave doesnít see much weather variance either but there was definitely large enough weather variations that caused road wear in the Chihuahuan Desert.  The roughest spots in terms of road wear in Arizona were along the Mogollon Rim where the snow and rains accumulated at the edge of the Colorado Plateau. 

Similarly low elevation desert regions in Nevada and California donít see a huge degree of wear.  Itís like Alps said, the more weather variation (namely freezing over frequently) the more roadways tend to be damaged.

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