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Do roads in Florida last longer than elsewhere?

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US 89:

--- Quote from: kernals12 on August 19, 2021, 07:56:18 PM ---But in terms of warmth, Florida is in a league of its own. Arizona does have parts that get cold. It will snow in the grand canyon.

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That is irrelevant. If you’re averaging the entire state, maybe… but Max was specifically referring to the Sonoran Desert and other low-elevation parts of the desert southwest, where snow is very rare to nonexistent and even freezes are notable events that don’t happen every year. The Grand Canyon rim and Flagstaff areas are around 7000 feet elevation.

kernals12:

--- Quote from: Alps on August 19, 2021, 06:23:29 PM ---The thing is, up north, pavement mixes are designed for freeze-thaw, so a single freeze/thaw cycle down South can do as much or more damage than an entire season up North. Some parts of Florida can freeze but it's usually not a deep enough freeze to damage pavement, so yes, their pavement will last a lot longer and many of their county roads still have secondary state pavement from the 70s-80s. Bridges, however, will be worn down by the flow of traffic and so their lifespans are not significantly longer (assuming proper maintenance in all climates).

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Dumb question: What is secondary state pavement?

Daniel Fiddler:
I read somewhere a few years ago where one year they ranked the best and worst roads in all 50 states.  In it, Florida had the best, Tennessee had the second best, and Georgia the third best.  And if memory serves me right, I think Pennsylvania had the worst and Ohio the second worst.  I forgot where I read this though.

kphoger:

--- Quote from: kernals12 on August 19, 2021, 12:59:26 PM ---

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--- Quote from: Max Rockatansky on August 19, 2021, 06:32:42 PM ---until ADOT starting messing around with that quiet rubberized asphalt mix

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Nice play.

Max Rockatansky:
^^^

That stuff seemed great until the desert heat started to converting into rubbery chunks that flew off the road surface. 


--- Quote from: Daniel Fiddler on August 20, 2021, 02:11:28 PM ---I read somewhere a few years ago where one year they ranked the best and worst roads in all 50 states.  In it, Florida had the best, Tennessee had the second best, and Georgia the third best.  And if memory serves me right, I think Pennsylvania had the worst and Ohio the second worst.  I forgot where I read this though.

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I can think of numerous metrics Florida really lacks in that would soundly knock it out of contention for "best" road network:

-  The surface road networks in major cities tend to be very poorly designed.  Example; trying getting anywhere in Orlando on a surface road often is frustrating and requires odd jogs through neighborhoods or around lakes. 
-  There is a huge number of timed lights on surface highways which tend to unnecessarily create backups and long wait times.
-  The shoulder widths on numerous conventional highways tend to run on the soft side or don't exist.
-  Turning lanes tend to very short and inadequate to filter traffic.
-  Speed limits are often too slow or posted in at a lower limit in places they aren't needed.  Example; major intersections on US 19 north of Crystal River don't need to drop from 65 MPH, to 55 MPH, to 45 MPH and back given the rural setting. 

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