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Author Topic: UDOT testing new road markings  (Read 1680 times)

US71

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UDOT testing new road markings
« on: March 12, 2020, 12:25:49 PM »

UDOT is testing glow in the dark road markings
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howlincoyote2k1

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Re: UDOT testing new road markings
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2020, 07:32:36 AM »

While this is sorely needed, I wish UDOT also added recessed pavement reflectors. Parts of California and Arizona use them and it makes it so much easier to see where the lanes are at night.
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US71

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Re: UDOT testing new road markings
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2020, 10:19:31 AM »

While this is sorely needed, I wish UDOT also added recessed pavement reflectors. Parts of California and Arizona use them and it makes it so much easier to see where the lanes are at night.

Does Utah get much snow? Recessed reflectors could be covered up in a snowstorm
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BigManFromAFRICA88

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Re: UDOT testing new road markings
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2020, 12:52:11 PM »

While this is sorely needed, I wish UDOT also added recessed pavement reflectors. Parts of California and Arizona use them and it makes it so much easier to see where the lanes are at night.

Does Utah get much snow? Recessed reflectors could be covered up in a snowstorm

Yes. Except for back like 10 years ago it fell frequently a couple inches at a time throughout winter. Now (*cough* global warming *cough*) falling much less frequently but at really extreme heights, so IDK if reflectors still would work in UT...are there any other places in the Mountain West similar to UT with reflectors? Because I don't think Colorado's considered them either, and while Las Vegas has them, I don't recall Reno or Carson City having them at all.
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roadfro

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Re: UDOT testing new road markings
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2020, 02:48:57 PM »

While this is sorely needed, I wish UDOT also added recessed pavement reflectors. Parts of California and Arizona use them and it makes it so much easier to see where the lanes are at night.

Does Utah get much snow? Recessed reflectors could be covered up in a snowstorm

Yes. Except for back like 10 years ago it fell frequently a couple inches at a time throughout winter. Now (*cough* global warming *cough*) falling much less frequently but at really extreme heights, so IDK if reflectors still would work in UT...are there any other places in the Mountain West similar to UT with reflectors? Because I don't think Colorado's considered them either, and while Las Vegas has them, I don't recall Reno or Carson City having them at all.

Raised pavement markings are not common in Nevada outside NDOT District 1 (southern Nevada), and except for a couple one-offs at some rural spot applications, are not really seen anywhere north of the Las Vegas urban limits.

I know of one location in Reno, Nevada that had recessed reflectors in the pavement: The I-80/Keystone Avenue interchange. Recessed reflectors were used in conjunction with painted lines to guide left turns through the SPUI. My hunch is that these were used for extra guidance given this is only second SPUI constructed in northern Nevada, and only used because the SPUI intersection is below the freeway (so the reflectors wouldn't be covered by snow). The intersection was repaved as part of the recent I-80 Reno West project, and the recessed reflectors no longer exist.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

US 89

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Re: UDOT testing new road markings
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2020, 04:46:23 PM »

While this is sorely needed, I wish UDOT also added recessed pavement reflectors. Parts of California and Arizona use them and it makes it so much easier to see where the lanes are at night.

Does Utah get much snow? Recessed reflectors could be covered up in a snowstorm

Yes. Except for back like 10 years ago it fell frequently a couple inches at a time throughout winter. Now (*cough* global warming *cough*) falling much less frequently but at really extreme heights, so IDK if reflectors still would work in UT...are there any other places in the Mountain West similar to UT with reflectors? Because I don't think Colorado's considered them either, and while Las Vegas has them, I don't recall Reno or Carson City having them at all.

From what I've observed through the years, it will snow a few inches several times over the course of a winter, with maybe 3 storms a year where it snows over 6 inches. I'm not sure I've noticed a decline in snow frequency at low elevations, especially because this kind of thing is so variable from year to year.

As for reflectors: you could probably get away with them in the lower elevations of Washington or Kane County, but I wouldn't use them elsewhere in the state.

BigManFromAFRICA88

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Re: UDOT testing new road markings
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2020, 11:57:08 PM »

Raised pavement markings are not common in Nevada outside NDOT District 1 (southern Nevada), and except for a couple one-offs at some rural spot applications, are not really seen anywhere north of the Las Vegas urban limits.

I know of one location in Reno, Nevada that had recessed reflectors in the pavement: The I-80/Keystone Avenue interchange. Recessed reflectors were used in conjunction with painted lines to guide left turns through the SPUI. My hunch is that these were used for extra guidance given this is only second SPUI constructed in northern Nevada, and only used because the SPUI intersection is below the freeway (so the reflectors wouldn't be covered by snow). The intersection was repaved as part of the recent I-80 Reno West project, and the recessed reflectors no longer exist.

This is much along the lines of what I thought. However, I'm actually optimistic about this glow-in-the-dark technology, especially if they combine it with the glass beads they already use.

Yes. Except for back like 10 years ago it fell frequently a couple inches at a time throughout winter. Now (*cough* global warming *cough*) falling much less frequently but at really extreme heights, so IDK if reflectors still would work in UT...are there any other places in the Mountain West similar to UT with reflectors? Because I don't think Colorado's considered them either, and while Las Vegas has them, I don't recall Reno or Carson City having them at all.

From what I've observed through the years, it will snow a few inches several times over the course of a winter, with maybe 3 storms a year where it snows over 6 inches. I'm not sure I've noticed a decline in snow frequency at low elevations, especially because this kind of thing is so variable from year to year.

As for reflectors: you could probably get away with them in the lower elevations of Washington or Kane County, but I wouldn't use them elsewhere in the state.

Just realized that elevation wasn't exactly the term I was going for, but still a better idea to use them down south around St. George like you said. I was thinking more depth? I was more trying to convey the fact that it snows much more rarely now, but when it does, you better crack your snowblower on and budget 3 hours cause you're gonna be clearing damn near 2 feet of that sh*t.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2020, 11:59:52 PM by BigManFromAFRICA88 »
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