AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Ontario's Highways  (Read 344942 times)

Stephane Dumas

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2273
  • Last Login: Today at 01:30:34 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1150 on: July 27, 2020, 05:32:23 PM »

We talk of this since the 1960s and can we said this is THE moment we awaiting for Hwy-7 freeway between Kitchener and Guelph?  https://www.guelphtoday.com/local-news/breaking-province-announces-new-highway-7-to-be-built-2564995

And there this video posted last April showing construction progress of Hwy-427 extension. 
Logged

Tom

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 200
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Michigan
  • Last Login: September 26, 2020, 11:19:11 AM
    • US-112
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1151 on: August 16, 2020, 09:51:38 PM »

Members of a church located on Ont. Hwy 666 successfully got MTO to renumber the highway in 1985:
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=QBJtjoHflPwC&dat=19851023&printsec=frontpage&hl=en (p.A5)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontario_Highway_658  :coffee:
 
Logged

Stephane Dumas

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2273
  • Last Login: Today at 01:30:34 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1152 on: August 17, 2020, 09:57:42 AM »

Members of a church located on Ont. Hwy 666 successfully got MTO to renumber the highway in 1985:
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=QBJtjoHflPwC&dat=19851023&printsec=frontpage&hl=en (p.A5)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontario_Highway_658  :coffee:
 

I wonder if that highway got its signs often stolen like the former US-666?

I also got a more direct link to that article, I hope it'll work. https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=BV8zAAAAIBAJ&sjid=tO8FAAAAIBAJ&pg=4935%2C894629
Logged

cbeach40

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 446
  • Location: Ontari-ari-ari-o
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:55 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1153 on: August 19, 2020, 10:50:32 AM »

Members of a church located on Ont. Hwy 666 successfully got MTO to renumber the highway in 1985:
https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=QBJtjoHflPwC&dat=19851023&printsec=frontpage&hl=en (p.A5)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontario_Highway_658  :coffee:
 

I wonder if that highway got its signs often stolen like the former US-666?

I also got a more direct link to that article, I hope it'll work. https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=BV8zAAAAIBAJ&sjid=tO8FAAAAIBAJ&pg=4935%2C894629

They often did. Highway 69 and Highway 420 often get stolen too for some reasons.  :hmmm:
Logged

Stephane Dumas

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2273
  • Last Login: Today at 01:30:34 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1154 on: September 06, 2020, 10:56:57 AM »

I saw that one on Skyscraperpage forums. https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showpost.php?p=9028843&postcount=826 Some commuters are sceptical about Toronto's third bypass aka possibly Hwy-413.
https://www.theifp.ca/news-story/10159512--between-30-to-60-seconds-new-400-series-highway-won-t-improve-commutes-for-georgetown-commuters/

Quote
Plans for a new highway that will ease traffic congestion through the Greater Toronto Area has been opposed by several groups in favour of alternative forms of transit.

The GTA West Highway, Highway 413, will pass through Halton Hills – stretching from Hwy. 407 in Milton to Hwy. 400 in Vaughan.

“The major issue is that this project is going to have significant impact on the environment and the communities through which it will pass,” said Keith Brooks, program director for Environmental Defense, “and it will deliver next to nothing in terms of benefits.”

According to a report commissioned by the Ontario government in 2018, the GTA West Corridor would save the average commuters between 30 and 60 seconds of travel time per trip.

As one user on Skyscraperpage mentionned, they could realign that proposed bypass and link it with the Bradford bypass.
Logged

andrepoiy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 453
  • Age: 17
  • Location: Vaughan, ON
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 05:45:50 AM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1155 on: December 10, 2020, 04:45:01 PM »

So technically not an Ontario highway anymore, but the VIVA Rapidways on Yonge Street seems to be mostly done! vivanext.com says it's 94% done and should be done by the end of 2020. (which is in a few weeks)
Logged

andrepoiy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 453
  • Age: 17
  • Location: Vaughan, ON
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 05:45:50 AM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1156 on: December 27, 2020, 07:58:36 PM »

So I was driving along Highway 48 today and when I came across the roundabout with Bloomington Road, I noticed the large amounts of money just dedicated to signage. Here's dashcam video, notice the 3 signs. First is a simple roundabout sign, the next one is the roundabout except showing the control cities, and the third is on a gantry showing the lanes and everything.

Logged

jakeroot

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 13511
  • U/Wash | GIS & Urban Design

  • Age: 25
  • Location: Seattle and Tacoma, WA Arlington, VA | Vancouver, BC
  • Last Login: Today at 01:28:22 AM
    • Flickr
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1157 on: January 02, 2021, 01:10:49 PM »

I have definitely never seen a roundabout in BC with two diagrammatic signs (the ground-mounted directional sign with arrows). I've also not seen white-on-green lane-use signs before. Over here, they're black-on-white.
Logged
Check out my Flickr  |  Comments which I make here do not reflect positions of the University of Washington ("UW"), anyone employed by UW, nor any other students of UW. All comments are my own, and reflect my own ridiculous opinions.

cbeach40

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 446
  • Location: Ontari-ari-ari-o
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:55 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1158 on: January 02, 2021, 11:14:49 PM »

I have definitely never seen a roundabout in BC with two diagrammatic signs (the ground-mounted directional sign with arrows). I've also not seen white-on-green lane-use signs before. Over here, they're black-on-white.

Black on white are typical here too but also regulatory. Green on white was selected to provide guidance but not be legally enforceable. If they were, large vehicles that have to straddle the roundabout lanes would be doing so illegally.
Logged

jakeroot

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 13511
  • U/Wash | GIS & Urban Design

  • Age: 25
  • Location: Seattle and Tacoma, WA Arlington, VA | Vancouver, BC
  • Last Login: Today at 01:28:22 AM
    • Flickr
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1159 on: January 02, 2021, 11:57:28 PM »

I have definitely never seen a roundabout in BC with two diagrammatic signs (the ground-mounted directional sign with arrows). I've also not seen white-on-green lane-use signs before. Over here, they're black-on-white.

Black on white are typical here too but also regulatory. Green on white was selected to provide guidance but not be legally enforceable. If they were, large vehicles that have to straddle the roundabout lanes would be doing so illegally.

Why the change from standard practice? It may not be technically legal to straddle lanes but it's not enforced?
Logged
Check out my Flickr  |  Comments which I make here do not reflect positions of the University of Washington ("UW"), anyone employed by UW, nor any other students of UW. All comments are my own, and reflect my own ridiculous opinions.

cbeach40

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 446
  • Location: Ontari-ari-ari-o
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:55 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1160 on: January 04, 2021, 10:56:54 AM »

I have definitely never seen a roundabout in BC with two diagrammatic signs (the ground-mounted directional sign with arrows). I've also not seen white-on-green lane-use signs before. Over here, they're black-on-white.

Black on white are typical here too but also regulatory. Green on white was selected to provide guidance but not be legally enforceable. If they were, large vehicles that have to straddle the roundabout lanes would be doing so illegally.

Why the change from standard practice? It may not be technically legal to straddle lanes but it's not enforced?

Basically, it's a new standard practice. The old one would open up a host of legal problems. The very, very short version of that is if there's ever a crash where regulatory signs are in place, but they contravene other messaging in place, then the road authority is definitely getting sued big time and the engineer who signed off on it would get their license revoked.

So, invent a new standard that's clear to drivers but doesn't put yourself in legal hell.
Logged

jakeroot

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 13511
  • U/Wash | GIS & Urban Design

  • Age: 25
  • Location: Seattle and Tacoma, WA Arlington, VA | Vancouver, BC
  • Last Login: Today at 01:28:22 AM
    • Flickr
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1161 on: January 05, 2021, 01:42:01 PM »

I have definitely never seen a roundabout in BC with two diagrammatic signs (the ground-mounted directional sign with arrows). I've also not seen white-on-green lane-use signs before. Over here, they're black-on-white.

Black on white are typical here too but also regulatory. Green on white was selected to provide guidance but not be legally enforceable. If they were, large vehicles that have to straddle the roundabout lanes would be doing so illegally.

Why the change from standard practice? It may not be technically legal to straddle lanes but it's not enforced?

Basically, it's a new standard practice. The old one would open up a host of legal problems. The very, very short version of that is if there's ever a crash where regulatory signs are in place, but they contravene other messaging in place, then the road authority is definitely getting sued big time and the engineer who signed off on it would get their license revoked.

So, invent a new standard that's clear to drivers but doesn't put yourself in legal hell.

Would it remove MTO from legal hell? I'm curious what the precedent is here. The bigger issue seems to be legal hell for everyone else: the new signs seem to imply that sticking to the lane lines is mere guidance and that drivers may, if they choose, simply ignore them. If the idea is for drivers who ignore the lines to potentially still be found at fault (there's still a sign!), then what have truckers gained from white-on-green signs? Either the lane lines are enforced or they're not.

Trucks and buses all over the US and Canada have warnings on the back that warn of lane-straddling/splitting and wide turns, and both types of vehicles frequently ignore existing regulatory signage and markings to safely complete manoeuvres. I'm not aware of any jurisdiction that has laws on the books permitting either vehicle to legally do these things, but its understood that they must. When a crash occurs, it is not the road authority who is found liable but those involved: if you search "truck wide right turn", 90% of the results are law firms looking to represent those involved in crashes. None of the pages seem to imply any DOT or MOT is responsible.
Logged
Check out my Flickr  |  Comments which I make here do not reflect positions of the University of Washington ("UW"), anyone employed by UW, nor any other students of UW. All comments are my own, and reflect my own ridiculous opinions.

cbeach40

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 446
  • Location: Ontari-ari-ari-o
  • Last Login: Today at 12:57:55 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1162 on: January 06, 2021, 02:02:57 AM »

Would it remove MTO from legal hell? I'm curious what the precedent is here. The bigger issue seems to be legal hell for everyone else: the new signs seem to imply that sticking to the lane lines is mere guidance and that drivers may, if they choose, simply ignore them. If the idea is for drivers who ignore the lines to potentially still be found at fault (there's still a sign!), then what have truckers gained from white-on-green signs? Either the lane lines are enforced or they're not.

For MTO, as their multi-lane roundabouts necessitate trucks straddling the lanes, and their signs and publications reflect that, then basically if they install regulatory signs then the messaging is contradictory. And if there's a crash and they get sued (which happens all the time), then that's a huge hole in their defense.

The advantage for drivers is that they are not obligated to follow the lane designations. If they were regulatory, then failure to follow them would be a Highway Traffic Act charge. But since they're not, even in the event of a collision they could not be charged for that.

So basically the signs are there to help people find the right lane, but it's not demanding that they do so.


Trucks and buses all over the US and Canada have warnings on the back that warn of lane-straddling/splitting and wide turns, and both types of vehicles frequently ignore existing regulatory signage and markings to safely complete manoeuvres. I'm not aware of any jurisdiction that has laws on the books permitting either vehicle to legally do these things, but its understood that they must. When a crash occurs, it is not the road authority who is found liable but those involved: if you search "truck wide right turn", 90% of the results are law firms looking to represent those involved in crashes. None of the pages seem to imply any DOT or MOT is responsible.

If an intersection's design will not accommodate the appropriate design vehicle (eg, a transport truck), then it probably would be irresponsible to put a lane designation on it. But that's up to them.

In terms of those law firms, yes, they are representing the victims of those crashes. And in addition to the trucking company, the driver and/or their insurance company, they will most assuredly sue the road authority as well. And the condition and messaging of the signs in the area will be one of the first things they look at.
Logged

zzcarp

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 304
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Westminster, CO
  • Last Login: Today at 02:53:39 AM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1163 on: March 30, 2021, 10:41:46 AM »

The MTO study on the replacement of the Little Current swing bridge between Manitoulin Island and Goat Island over the North Channel in northern Ontario is complete. The verdict: build another swing bridge but with two lanes.

Quote
Feedback from the public consultations, both in-person and online, showed that tourism and heritage were top-of-mind for many respondents who shared that the swing bridge should be maintained as it is a symbol of Manitoulin Island, a tourist attraction and has historic meaning to the people of the Island. It would appear the MTO took these directives to heart.

Out of 10 alternatives, the double-lane swing bridge rated the highest, at 74 percent, on Stantec’s evaluation chart that factored in environmental impacts, the community and engineering. The lowest rating went to the tunnel and fixed skyway-style bridge options.

The MTO and Stantec note that the swing bridge is the preferred option because: the new bridge accommodates two lanes of traffic; maintains existing grades for active transportation users, such as pedestrians and cyclists (a sidewalk will be featured on the west side of the new bridge as is the case with the current model); minimizes impacts to the existing roadway network; has no impact to existing utilities; boasts a lower construction cost compared to the other alternatives; has the lowest impact to existing residential properties; has the lowest impact to noise sensitive areas; there is no change to access the Little Current business area; it minimizes impacts to existing viewscape from Little Current and the North Channel; it has the lowest potential to impact wildlife habitat and species at risk; avoids impacts to the “high quality alvars” nearby; and, with the exception of the bascule (lift) option, the swing bridge is anticipated to impact the smallest area of lakebed during construction.

The one-lane bridge is the only fixed link to the mainland from Manitoulin Island. Constructed in 1913 for the Algoma railroad, the bridge deck was retrofitted in 1945 to allow vehicular traffic and designated as part of Highway 68. Alternating directions of traffic are controlled by traffic signals that turned red when the span was open or when a train was passing.

The railroad was abandoned in the early 80's. Also in 1980, Highway 68 was subsumed in its entirety by an extension of Highway 6 across the Tobermory Ferry to Highway 17 in McKerrow.

A YouTube rendering of the proposed replacement swing bridge and more history of the current bridge are in the article linked at the top of the post.
Logged
So many miles and so many roads

AsphaltPlanet

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2897
  • Single Occupant Vehicle Commuter

  • Location: Toronto, Ontario
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:03 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1164 on: March 30, 2021, 04:17:34 PM »

I haven't uploaded any photos in this forum for a while.  But here are some recent photos of the construction to twin Highway 69 between Parry Sound and Sudbury:


http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC08187_Mar21_lg.jpg

View of the current southern end of the divided highway south of Sudbury:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09448_Mar21_24x16.jpg

Some of the signage has been erected -- this is the northbound advanced signage for the future Highway 607 interchange:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09218_Mar21_24x16.jpg

View looking at the French River bridges.  I am standing beneath the old bridge that now carries the service road:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09065_Mar21_24x16.jpg

View of the Settlers Road overpass -- this is the service road, but represents the former highway alignment:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09439_Mar21_24x16.jpg

View looking southerly between the new twin bridges that will carry the highway overtop of the Pickerel River.

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09391_Mar21_24x16.jpg

Another view of the Pickerel River Bridge:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09402_Mar21_24x16.jpg

And one more photo, this time unrepeated to the highway construction at the Magnetawan River Bridge, further south:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_60-69_images/69_cl_DSC09211_Mar21_24x16.jpg
Logged
AsphaltPlanet.ca  Youtube -- Opinions expressed reflect the viewpoints of others.

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14285
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 38
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 01:04:57 AM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1165 on: March 30, 2021, 05:33:34 PM »

I haven't uploaded any photos in this forum for a while.  But here are some recent photos of the construction to twin Highway 69 between Parry Sound and Sudbury:
Will this become more of 400 or stay as 69? I know Ontario only uses 4xx for freeways, unlike QC's autoroutes.

AsphaltPlanet

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2897
  • Single Occupant Vehicle Commuter

  • Location: Toronto, Ontario
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:03 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1166 on: March 30, 2021, 06:51:55 PM »

The plan is to number the entire route as Hwy 400 once the gap in between the two freeway segments has been closed.
Logged
AsphaltPlanet.ca  Youtube -- Opinions expressed reflect the viewpoints of others.

andrepoiy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 453
  • Age: 17
  • Location: Vaughan, ON
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 05:45:50 AM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1167 on: March 30, 2021, 11:40:16 PM »

Although a lot of regular Ontario Provincial Highways are not numbered 4xx if they're not controlled access the full way. For example Highway 115 is controlled access for like 60% of its length but is still 115.

Btw, @asphaltplanet, do you and TheKingsHighway know each other? Both of your sites seem to serve the same purpose.
Logged

webfil

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 349
  • I thought being taught would be tough, though.

  • Age: 33
  • Location: Sainte-Marie, QC, Canada
  • Last Login: July 23, 2021, 01:37:26 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1168 on: March 31, 2021, 08:20:57 AM »

I haven't uploaded any photos in this forum for a while.  But here are some recent photos of the construction to twin Highway 69 between Parry Sound and Sudbury

Are there any plans for grade separation at McFarlane Lake as well as full cloverleaf at 69/17?

Seeing the topography and the purpose each road serve, I think I kinda know the answer ― but I'm still curious.
Logged

GaryV

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2065
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Last Login: Today at 01:26:52 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1169 on: March 31, 2021, 09:31:09 AM »

Although a lot of regular Ontario Provincial Highways are not numbered 4xx if they're not controlled access the full way. For example Highway 115 is controlled access for like 60% of its length but is still 115.

Well, there isn't a 415, so perhaps they are holding it in reserve should the whole thing eventually become a freeway.
Logged

andrepoiy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 453
  • Age: 17
  • Location: Vaughan, ON
  • Last Login: July 24, 2021, 05:45:50 AM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1170 on: March 31, 2021, 11:21:11 AM »

Although a lot of regular Ontario Provincial Highways are not numbered 4xx if they're not controlled access the full way. For example Highway 115 is controlled access for like 60% of its length but is still 115.

Well, there isn't a 415, so perhaps they are holding it in reserve should the whole thing eventually become a freeway.

The interesting thing about 115 that the non-freeway section (it's a RIRO section) is co-signed with Highway 35. So if they remove the concurrency, then it could very well just be 415, since without the concurrency, the whole of 115 would be controlled-access.
Logged

AsphaltPlanet

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2897
  • Single Occupant Vehicle Commuter

  • Location: Toronto, Ontario
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:03 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1171 on: March 31, 2021, 11:39:30 AM »

Btw, @asphaltplanet, do you and TheKingsHighway know each other? Both of your sites seem to serve the same purpose.

Yes, we know each other.  We have been good friends for many years.  As I have been with some other contributors to this forum.

I haven't uploaded any photos in this forum for a while.  But here are some recent photos of the construction to twin Highway 69 between Parry Sound and Sudbury

Are there any plans for grade separation at McFarlane Lake as well as full cloverleaf at 69/17?

Seeing the topography and the purpose each road serve, I think I kinda know the answer ― but I'm still curious.

The long term plan is to convert the remaining section of Highway 69 from Estaire Road to Highway 17 as a freeway.  I don't anticipate that work being completed as expediently as the work to twin the rest of Highway 69.  Highway 69 will meet Highway 17 at a modified trumpet/parclo hybrid interchange that serves all of the freeway to freeway movements with direct connections (though still a loop ramp from Highway 69/400 to Highway 17 West).  An interchange will be completed in the middle of the urban area on the existing Highway 69.

At one point, there was plans to build a new freeway alignment to the east of the lake through there and meeting Highway 17 a few kilometers east of the current interchange and leaving the current four-lane undivided highway relatively intact, but those plans have been scrapped.
Logged
AsphaltPlanet.ca  Youtube -- Opinions expressed reflect the viewpoints of others.

aboges26

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 162
  • Age: 2016
  • Location: NM
  • Last Login: July 23, 2021, 01:53:49 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1172 on: April 04, 2021, 08:22:53 PM »

The plan is to number the entire route as Hwy 400 once the gap in between the two freeway segments has been closed.

Is the work only planned to progress now from north to south?  I have not seen any movement on 400 northward from the Nobel bypass.
Logged

AsphaltPlanet

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2897
  • Single Occupant Vehicle Commuter

  • Location: Toronto, Ontario
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:03 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1173 on: April 05, 2021, 09:32:04 AM »

^ For all of the segments that remain now, the new highway crosses First Nations land.  The land transfer process when dealing with First Nations is often long and complicated, even if both sides are willing participants.

Because of this, work had been progressing from the northern end southerly, but they've now run out of room, and all of the remaining segments have at least some impacts to First Nations land.

I don't know what the status of the negotiations are.
Logged
AsphaltPlanet.ca  Youtube -- Opinions expressed reflect the viewpoints of others.

AsphaltPlanet

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2897
  • Single Occupant Vehicle Commuter

  • Location: Toronto, Ontario
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:03 PM
Re: Ontario's Highways
« Reply #1174 on: April 10, 2021, 09:10:25 PM »

A couple of photos of the second phase of the 407 extension taken last fall.  These photos were taken from the Liberty Street overpass in Bomanville early last October.  The autumn colours hadn't peaked yet when these photos were taken, but obviously there was some good colour starting.  I think this is my favourite vantage point of the 407 extension:


http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_407-409_images/407_cl_141_east_t_Oct-3_20_24x16.jpg


http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_407-409_images/407_cl_141_east_EB_Oct-3_20_24x16.jpg
Logged
AsphaltPlanet.ca  Youtube -- Opinions expressed reflect the viewpoints of others.

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.