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What is the worst kind of COLD?

Started by thspfc, April 04, 2022, 08:27:33 AM

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What is the worst kind of cold?

40 & high winds
7 (16.3%)
35 & rain
30 (69.8%)
30 & snow
3 (7%)
15 & clear/low winds
3 (7%)

Total Members Voted: 43

thspfc



hotdogPi

#1
35 and rain is fine because it melts snow, as long as it doesn't freeze afterwards.

When I was working at Stop & Shop, I would sometimes take carriages from outside and put them inside. If I brought my heavy coat but not a light one, I would be fine in the 30s pushing carriages without a coat at all, although I would wear my light jacket if I had it. (Wearing a heavy coat makes me look less like an employee.)

There's also something called the clean sweep that requires checking certain rooms every hour (sometimes people would alternate), and one of them was the 5¢ deposit bottle room that required going outside and back inside. (There was an indoor connection for employees, but the door was typically locked, and it took longer, anyway.) One time, when it was 14°, I went in, scanned something, and went back out, without any type of coat or jacket at all. 15 seconds outside each way. And no, it wasn't 14°C.

My vote is for the kind that causes coughing.
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1995hoo

Whatever one is bothering me at any particular moment.

With that said, I voted for 35 and rain.
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kphoger

35 and rain.

And that's because rain soaks through my socks and gloves a lot more than snow does.  I'd much rather be working outdoors in 15-degree snow than 35-degree rain.

Take it from someone whose first job was pushing shopping carts full-time.
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Max Rockatansky

40 and windy.  If the air is stable much colder temperatures are way more tolerable.  This is was a frequent issue in Phoenix during the winter where the temperature would hover around 40F but would have 30-40 MPH gusts during the early morning.  I had to use a shit ton of Vaseline on exposed skin when I did my distance runs to mitigate the effects of the wind.

JayhawkCO

In the past couple of years, I've been hiking at -15 in Rocky Mountain National Park and in New Orleans when it was 45 and drizzling. I've rarely been as cold as I was in New Orleans. The humidity makes the chill go straight to the bone.

webny99

I'm currently dealing with a head cold, so that's all I could think about when I first saw the thread title. For that kind of cold, my answer would be sore throat + constant nasal drip + constantly feeling like you could sneeze at any moment.  :meh:

As far as cold weather, I had to go with 40 and windy because I don't have a huge issue with any of the other three options. 30 and snow is just standard winter weather; without that, there would be no winter. 15 and sunny can be beautiful if there's fresh snow, and 35 and rainy is ugly if you're outside, but it's also the kind of weather that makes one feel warm inside - perfect for snuggling up on the couch with a warm drink, something to read, and a fire in the fireplace.

webny99

Quote from: 1 on April 04, 2022, 08:31:59 AM
One time, when it was 14°, I went in, scanned something, and went back out, without any type of coat or jacket at all. 15 seconds outside each way. And no, it wasn't 14°C.

I've done something like this (taking out the garbage, for example) probably more times than I can count. My mom says it's the Scandinavian blood that prevents one from getting too cold. I say it's just because I'm a big, well-insulated person, so I'm too warm much more often than too cold - although I suppose that does relate to one's genealogy as well.

Billy F 1988

Single digits to double digits below zero with around 20 to 40 below zero wind chill and 30 to 45 MPH gusts to boot. Hellgate Canyon is very much a funnel of this bitter cold during the winter. Already this winter, there were three bouts of cold spells between December and February in the Missoula Valley. I wouldn't wanna be in Highline or eastern Montana where they don't have the mountains to buffer the much bitter cold.
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webny99

Quote from: webny99 on April 05, 2022, 02:05:22 PM
For that kind of cold, my answer would be sore throat + constant nasal drip + constantly feeling like you could sneeze at any moment.

I jinxed myself so bad. My eyes have been watering nonstop and I've been feeling like I could sneeze at any moment for about three straight hours. I finished a box of tissues this morning, went through another whole box, and I'm on to my third box and it's not even noon yet!  :crazy:

english si

A lot of people are surprised their first English winter at how cold it feels - worse than their colder-by-the-thermometer continental climate winters.

Part of that is the wet (humidity as well as actual rain - often taking the form of light drizzle. 'The fine rain that soaks you through'), part of that is the wind (if it's rainy, its normally windy though).

I went with 35 and rainy, but if its humid with the 40 and windy, but not windy in the 35 and rainy, then it's a bit less clear. Also depends on the type of rain.


I've done dealing with drop outs in big (like 200 young people) Scout hikes that take place in Winter. Wind is a little annoying, but doesn't cause drop outs as they walk (but is really not fun when camping). Wet causes issues (even if it's not raining, mud and puddles due to feet getting wet and general heavy going). Snow is fantastic and you get fewer drop outs in a blizzard than if its 40 and dry. But snow really irritates the adults who need to drive, especially if there's a lot and it settles (ie more amusement for the Scouts).
Quote from: webny99 on April 05, 2022, 02:05:22 PM30 and snow is just standard winter weather; without that, there would be no winter.
I had no winter this year then. Most snow we had this winter was last week, but the temperature was a bit above 32, and the snow didn't settle. The week before it was in the 70s as the regular February warm-spell was a month late.

But despite 'no winter', boy was I cold (or wrapped in in several warm layers) most of the time I was outside Nov-Feb.

webny99

Quote from: english si on April 07, 2022, 02:24:37 PM
...
Quote from: webny99 on April 05, 2022, 02:05:22 PM30 and snow is just standard winter weather; without that, there would be no winter.
I had no winter this year then. Most snow we had this winter was last week, but the temperature was a bit above 32, and the snow didn't settle. The week before it was in the 70s as the regular February warm-spell was a month late.

But despite 'no winter', boy was I cold (or wrapped in in several warm layers) most of the time I was outside Nov-Feb.

Perhaps not "no winter", but not my kind of winter anyways. A winter without snow just wouldn't seem right, although I know it is common in other parts of the country and world.

JayhawkCO

Quote from: webny99 on April 07, 2022, 03:15:30 PM
Quote from: english si on April 07, 2022, 02:24:37 PM
...
Quote from: webny99 on April 05, 2022, 02:05:22 PM30 and snow is just standard winter weather; without that, there would be no winter.
I had no winter this year then. Most snow we had this winter was last week, but the temperature was a bit above 32, and the snow didn't settle. The week before it was in the 70s as the regular February warm-spell was a month late.

But despite 'no winter', boy was I cold (or wrapped in in several warm layers) most of the time I was outside Nov-Feb.

Perhaps not "no winter", but not my kind of winter anyways. A winter without snow just wouldn't seem right, although I know it is common in other parts of the country and world.

Antarctica.  :nod:

CtrlAltDel

Quote from: 1995hoo on April 04, 2022, 08:32:53 AM
Whatever one is bothering me at any particular moment.

Hey! You stole my answer from the other thread!  :-D

Quote from: CtrlAltDel on September 04, 2021, 07:28:29 PM
I know that this is going to come across as subjective, but the worst kind of heat is whatever kind I am currently experiencing. And it's the same for cold, too, to be honest.
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jgb191

As long as I am directly in the sunlight with calm winds and doing some form of physical activity, I can generally tolerate as low as mid-50s without a sweater.  But when I stand still in the shade with a strong breeze, I start to shiver when the temperature drops below 70 degrees (as was the case last couple of nights).
We're so far south that we're not even considered "The South"

rlb2024

Quote from: JayhawkCO on April 04, 2022, 11:27:41 AM
In the past couple of years, I've been hiking at -15 in Rocky Mountain National Park and in New Orleans when it was 45 and drizzling. I've rarely been as cold as I was in New Orleans. The humidity makes the chill go straight to the bone.
True dat.  I live in south Louisiana, and the damp chill around here will go right through you and freeze you.  We were in Indiana just before Thanksgiving, and the temperature was in the upper teens at night and mid-30s during the day -- but it was dry.  Seemed almost balmy compared to a New Orleans winter.

Scott5114

Quote from: jgb191 on April 08, 2022, 03:00:27 PM
As long as I am directly in the sunlight with calm winds and doing some form of physical activity, I can generally tolerate as low as mid-50s without a sweater.  But when I stand still in the shade with a strong breeze, I start to shiver when the temperature drops below 70 degrees (as was the case last couple of nights).

Ha. Mid-50s is when I consider wearing something more substantial than shorts and a T-shirt, unless I intend to spend a long amount of time outside...
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jgb191

Quote from: Scott5114 on April 08, 2022, 06:55:03 PM
unless I intend to spend a long amount of time outside...

That's exactly my point:  as long as I am outside in the sun with minimal breeze and doing something strenuous (like playing basketball or tennis), I can feel fine without a sweater even below 60 degrees.
We're so far south that we're not even considered "The South"

skluth

I'm assuming Fahrenheit. 35 and raining, especially if you're at an autumn football game and your team is losing.

wxfree

To me, very cold weather (20s or lower) is invigorating.  I live in Texas where we don't have months and months of that to wear me down.  The worst kind of cold is just slightly cold, in the 40s, and cloudy.  That's depressing.  Sunny and very cold is great.

In February 2021 we had extreme cold, getting below zero for the second time in my life.  One day it was cloudy and windy, and I walked on a lake, for the first time, and the waves were pushing up over the edge of the ice.  It was like being in the Arctic.  That cold was nice, but it was much better the next day when it was just as cold, but sunny.
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kirbykart

I'd say the 35 and rain. 30 and snow is much better than 35 and rain. There's not much that chills you right to the bone like a frigid rain.

ET21

There is nothing worst then that very damp, raw 35 with rain and a little wind.
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Quote from: ET21 on November 12, 2022, 06:14:15 PM
There is nothing worst then that very damp, raw 35 with rain and a little wind.

The worst is when it's like that but the forecast originally had snow. Will never forget the time my freshman year of college that a whole day of classes was cancelled after we got a winter weather advisory calling for 0-1 inches of snow, and then all we got was 2 hours of that cold rain. I don't think we ever even had flurries that winter.

Georgia Guardrail

What's really bad is when you have the 35 degree rain then the next day it is dry and in the teens.  With nothing but slick spots and frozen windshields.   Happens a lot here in Georgia due to the southeast ridge.

kkt

Wet cold, and wet that has frozen to ice overnight are both really bad.  Ice is more dangerous, tho.



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