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I-70 in Colorado: Mountain Corridor Upgrades

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zzcarp:

--- Quote from: JayhawkCO on June 16, 2023, 10:33:55 AM ---
--- Quote from: MCRoads on June 16, 2023, 10:23:07 AM ---The actual solution is to get people out of their cars, and into busses that actually work, and are cheaper than driving. Yes, a train would be great, but it’s not practical. Busses are economical, and they will get folks off the road, provided the buses are faster. Making the hard shoulder a “bus lane”  would do that just fine, and with minimal cost to the existing project.

--- End quote ---

The problem isn't the cost; it's the time and convenience. I care about the environment. That said, when I worked downtown, I could drive and be there in 20 minutes. Taking the bus, lightrail, and then walking, was a 70 minute trip. I couldn't possibly justify taking public transportation.

Same thing going up to the mountains. You think people want to schlep all of their skis, winter clothes, boots, etc. onto a bus just to save $5 when their lift tickets cost them $200? Then they somehow have to transfer from wherever the bus let off to get to the hotel/slopes and schlep that same amount of stuff? Not happening.

--- End quote ---

Exactly. I live in Westminster and work in Inverness. While I drive the suck of I-25 daily where my commute varies from 40 minutes to an hour, it's 2 hours on RTD public transit from my office door to the bus stop 2 miles from my house which is another half hour or so. It's just not worth it.

There already is a weekend and holiday (except Christmas) public bus service through CDOT in the winter from December to early May on the "Snowstang". It's a $25 round trip from Denver to A-Basin, Copper Mountain, Breckenridge, and Loveland; and a $40 round trip to Steamboat Springs. It looks like there's only one bus per day to the resorts and one ride back. There's also other transit options listed for those who want that. But the demand for that doesn't seem to be high due to the reasons above and the last mile problem.

thenetwork:
FWIW, CDOT runs a pretty decent statewide bus network called Bustang.  A few of its routes (like Denver to Grand Junction) pretty much follows an identical Greyhound route on a more-regional limit.  It runs several times a day, depending on the route.

I know some people think rail is the green answer to all I-70 mountain problems -- especially if it's am electric rail system.  The problem with rail is that by the time you plan and build it, the initial demographics and routing may be outdated  by the time the first train rolls.

At least with buses, the route can begin a fraction of the time.sooner and can change entire routes based on demand and popularity.

DenverBrian:

--- Quote from: MCRoads on June 16, 2023, 10:23:07 AM ---As someone who says they are from LA, I find it hilarious that you are trying so hard to argue induced demand doesn’t exist. I-405 is an excellent examples of this. Did the Sepulveda Pass project reduce congestion? Or did it simply add another lane of traffic? How about the previous project? Or the one before that?

--- End quote ---
I diunno. 405 between Long Beach and Irvine has significantly better traffic flow in my experience with the additional lanes there. <shrugs>

zachary_amaryllis:

--- Quote from: thenetwork on June 16, 2023, 07:48:14 PM ---FWIW, CDOT runs a pretty decent statewide bus network called Bustang.  A few of its routes (like Denver to Grand Junction) pretty much follows an identical Greyhound route on a more-regional limit.  It runs several times a day, depending on the route.

I know some people think rail is the green answer to all I-70 mountain problems -- especially if it's am electric rail system.  The problem with rail is that by the time you plan and build it, the initial demographics and routing may be outdated  by the time the first train rolls.

At least with buses, the route can begin a fraction of the time.sooner and can change entire routes based on demand and popularity.

--- End quote ---

+1 for the Bustang. If I have to go to Denver during the week, it's a no-brainer, and a 5-block walk down 16th street to my work. Ten bucks one-way.

Plutonic Panda:

--- Quote from: DenverBrian on June 17, 2023, 09:21:36 AM ---
--- Quote from: MCRoads on June 16, 2023, 10:23:07 AM ---As someone who says they are from LA, I find it hilarious that you are trying so hard to argue induced demand doesn’t exist. I-405 is an excellent examples of this. Did the Sepulveda Pass project reduce congestion? Or did it simply add another lane of traffic? How about the previous project? Or the one before that?

--- End quote ---
I diunno. 405 between Long Beach and Irvine has significantly better traffic flow in my experience with the additional lanes there. <shrugs>

--- End quote ---
It really does. Outside of rush hour(and sometimes even then) traffic starts to flow much better in Orange County with wider roads

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