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 1 
 on: Today at 01:27:13 PM 
Started by Zeffy - Last post by Beltway
Well, they're basically done with laying the concrete on the ramps. All that's left to do is all the striping, tie-ins, signage, etc. That shouldn't take very long, but since this is PA, it could take forever. I mean, in the '50s, they built the entirety of the original NJ Turnpike in less than two years, but that was then, and this is now.
Well, the NJTA essentially built 32 miles of new roadway in 5 years (during the exit 6-9 widening). Not on the order of the original feat, but much faster than any other modern project I can think of.

If the agency awards 118 miles of construction contracts in a few months then the highway can get built in 2 years or so.  Most other turnpikes were built very quickly, by issuing enough bonds to cover the whole cost.

 2 
 on: Today at 01:24:12 PM 
Started by Pink Jazz - Last post by Interstate 69 Fan
What is more amazing, you guessed correctly one of the replacement names!
Here are my picks for replacement names:
  • Harvey replaced by Hank (Nope, Harold)
  • Irma replaced by Idalia (Correct!)
  • Maria replaced by Maleficent (Nope, Margot)
  • Nate replaced by Neil (Nope, Nigel)

Nice call.

 3 
 on: Today at 01:17:59 PM 
Started by MantyMadTown - Last post by Brandon
Is there anything that justifies the conversion of US 36 between Hannibal and I-35 to a full freeway? I sure don't see it. It's a four-lane arterial route with limited-access sections in many places, including bypasses of the towns it passes by. Granted, I've only driven it once, but traffic seemed to be light and flowing freely across the corridor.

Again I say ... not every four-lane needs to be a freeway built to Interstate standards (I'm looking at you, US 31 in Indiana and US 220 in Virginia.)

As of now, probably not. But, in the future, if the truck traffic and traffic in general increases, then possibly. For the most part it has interchanges at the major intersections. So maybe a few more interchanges here and there if the need warrants it. Also, maybe fixing stuff like this.

That's minor.  I'd settle for getting rid of the signals in Cameron, Missouri.

 4 
 on: Today at 01:16:41 PM 
Started by 74/171FAN - Last post by Beltway
I'm still laughing over the concept that Martinsville is considered to be in southwestern Virginia.

Depends on who is defining it.  I don't know of an official definition, but the Wikipedia article includes Martinsville and Henry County.

"Southwest Virginia, often abbreviated as SWVA, is a mountainous region of Virginia in the westernmost part of the commonwealth.  Located within the broader region of western Virginia, Southwest Virginia has been defined alternatively as all Virginia counties on the Appalachian Plateau, all Virginia counties west of the Eastern Continental Divide, or at its greatest expanse, as far east as Blacksburg and Roanoke.  Another geographic categorization of the region places it as those counties within the Tennessee River watershed.  Regardless of how borders are drawn, Southwest Virginia differs from the rest of the commonwealth in that its culture is more closely associated with Appalachia than the other regions of Virginia."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southwest_Virginia

 5 
 on: Today at 01:07:30 PM 
Started by 1 - Last post by AMLNet49
I think the NJTA has a natural resistance to thinking of themselves as part of a larger highway system. They kind of of exist in their own little NJ Turnpike World or they did for many years anyway. Ya' know, first there is the premier New Jersey Turnpike, and then there's all the other roads. LOL
I'm not sure what's so "LOL" about this. The NJTA invented many of the current singing and marking standards, along with CalTrans. Those organizations have always felt they had senior status because even the Feds are their junior.

Most of the other toll road agencies also had these grandfather rights to have the liberty of setting their some of own signage and marking standards. There were even state DOTs (besides caltrans) that were as old or older than the feds which would have some of their own unique standards. This group includes the sequential numbering states. However these two groups were usually closer to federal standards and less belligerent about it than the NJTA/Caltans

Two things happened in the 2000s to change that:
1) At some point in the 2000s leading up to the 2009 MUTCD, new blood came into the feds that decided they were tired of being bullied around by the state DOTs and toll road agencies. They embarked on a long-range program over the course of at least 10-15 years to try and bring all signage in the country into line with a federal design standard, with milage based exit numbers being universal. There is essentially a set of requirements that all state DOT's and toll road agencies must follow on their signage, which leaves the room to be different at an absolute minimum. Some states like Connecticut and many others have totally dropped their own designs and just adopted the federal standard.

This program has involved even Caltrans and the NJTA (both kicking and screaming all the way), but essentially the feds decided to assert their power for the first time. They basically gave a middle finger to the "holier than thou" attitude which generated the respect which had provided the NJTA and Caltrans with leverage for all those years.

and in the same time frame
2) Several of the toll road agencies began to be exposed as not being, in fact, as squeaky clean and self-sufficient as they had always claimed. The agencies were exposed as enormously corrupt and states began to realize they needed more state oversight and didnt need to be autonomous. As they began to be folded into state DOTs (who are largely more MUTCD compliant than toll roads), or at least be held more accountable to the state government, some of these unique standards have been dropped. The "holier than thou" bubble was burst and state and federal reps started asking themselves, "Why again are these guys allowed to just do whatever they want? Because theyre grandfathered in? At some point its just an excuse to avoid oversight"

 6 
 on: Today at 01:07:01 PM 
Started by Michael - Last post by CNGL-Leudimin
IIRC the Interstate shield is copyrighted, but now I don't recall who holds the copyright, if the AASHTO or the FHWA. But they don't really enforce it, unlike some asshole companies do.

 7 
 on: Today at 12:56:35 PM 
Started by LM117 - Last post by RoadPelican
I think the gas tax rate for NC went down slightly in the last few years.  NC uses a formula where the gas tax is based on the price of a gallon of gas, the lower the gas price the lower the tax and vice versa.  I believe the current rate is around 34 cents/gallon with a floor of 30 cents/gallon.  The 30 cent floor was passed by the legislature sometime in 2015 when gas went from $3.50/gallon down to under $2.

 8 
 on: Today at 12:54:42 PM 
Started by Stephane Dumas - Last post by cabiness42
Jags to London has picked up pace - Shahid Khan is in talks with the FA to buy Wembley Stadium for 800 million (it seems odd for US sports team to pay for its stadium...).

Articles from: Sky Sports and BBC Sport.

How is this even going to work?  Are the Jags going to be making trans-Atlantic flights every other week?  Will they get their road games grouped together in 2s and 3s and stay in the US in between games?  The other AFC South teams will have to go to London every year.  The novelty probably wears off in a couple years and then it becomes a long trip they have to take every year but other teams only have to take once every few years.

 9 
 on: Today at 12:41:52 PM 
Started by MantyMadTown - Last post by mvak36
Is there anything that justifies the conversion of US 36 between Hannibal and I-35 to a full freeway? I sure don't see it. It's a four-lane arterial route with limited-access sections in many places, including bypasses of the towns it passes by. Granted, I've only driven it once, but traffic seemed to be light and flowing freely across the corridor.

Again I say ... not every four-lane needs to be a freeway built to Interstate standards (I'm looking at you, US 31 in Indiana and US 220 in Virginia.)

As of now, probably not. But, in the future, if the truck traffic and traffic in general increases, then possibly. For the most part it has interchanges at the major intersections. So maybe a few more interchanges here and there if the need warrants it. Also, maybe fixing stuff like this.

 10 
 on: Today at 12:40:01 PM 
Started by bing101 - Last post by bing101
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJZeLglVdhzrHqUHIEesPxw/videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjoOEAS7pB0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOKCPFokrfM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEPjM4E1MQc

Here is a cool video profile though where the roadgeek featured in this video is doing a roadgeek tour looking for houses on sale in the cities featured in this video.


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