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 1 
 on: Today at 09:09:18 AM 
Started by Interstate 69 Fan - Last post by SSOWorld
https://www.weather.gov/dmx/20180719_Tornadoes

Two EF3s and an EF2

 2 
 on: Today at 09:09:02 AM 
Started by empirestate - Last post by US71
Since it's been a week since anyone has posted, let's see if I can get this moving again

Quote
July 21, 2018: Old signs, New signs


From 2006, an OK 112 "meatcleaver" with an OK 9A "bullet" shield


I-40 at Conway, Arkansas circa 2008


 3 
 on: Today at 09:02:55 AM 
Started by US71 - Last post by abefroman329
Chili ain't chili without beans!

Or hunks of meat. Cincinnati-style chili sucks.

I never thought Iíd miss any of the food in DC, but I really miss Hard Times Cafe.

 4 
 on: Today at 09:02:54 AM 
Started by index - Last post by SSOWorld
That freeways are free as in no cost to the user.

And that tollways are double taxation.

But remember, nobody, but NOBODY in Wisconsin nor Illinois will ever refer to an Illinois Tollway as a 'freeway'.  It's a 'tollway'.

;-)

Mike
That tollways are not freeways.

TECHNICAL TERMS: Tollway is part of the name of the road.  freeway is the type of road and the term has nothing to do with how much extra $$ you put into the coin bucket/transponder account.  They are free as in free of interference from crossing traffic (maniac weavers non-withstanding).   that being saidMike's statement is correct that locals of Chicagoland and state and ISTHA officials do refer to the system as tollway to distinguish it by name.  Same is held true for other agencies (Houston (Harris County), Dallas (North Texas))

It's just a name, kids!

 5 
 on: Today at 08:58:36 AM 
Started by roadman65 - Last post by abefroman329
Iíve never seen a couch in a therapistís office. Most notably, Dr. Melfi in The Sopranos did not have one.

Iíve also noticed that film and television donít do a great job of explaining the distinction between a psychologist and a psychiatrist.

 6 
 on: Today at 08:54:37 AM 
Started by 1 - Last post by SectorZ
How is such legal?  If they make improvements knowing that they'll get taken, they deserve no damages at all.  In fact, THEY should be paying damages to the STATE for even thinking to try such a thing!

So they aren't allowed to make improvements to their own property, while waiting on the state to maybe do construction there?

 7 
 on: Today at 08:51:33 AM 
Started by flaroads - Last post by ARMOURERERIC
I know it's a long way off, but I look forward to when they widen NC18 to 4 lanes from Morganton to Shelby, the widening from Morganton to Lenoir is making its way up the list.

 8 
 on: Today at 08:50:22 AM 
Started by Jim - Last post by US71
And a short trip on 80 to Cuba, AL

 9 
 on: Today at 08:43:59 AM 
Started by Alps - Last post by ixnay
It also collectively describes a geographic area - an island which includes Diamond Beach (which doesn't have "Wildwood" in its name). The other ones are just convenient ways for people (and traffic agencies) to describe groups of adjacent municipalities with similar names.

Its called "Five-Mile Island".

And Stone Harbor and Avalon are on Seven Mile Island. 

When I lived in Cape May County in late 1986/early 1987, I never heard the locals refer to Five Mile and Seven Mile Islands by their names, although the trend regarding Cape May Court House (the county seat; I worked in that town during those months) was to call it simply "Court House".

ixnay

 10 
 on: Today at 08:42:17 AM 
Started by webny99 - Last post by 1995hoo
Portions of Kenilworth Avenue in PG County, Maryland. Some people, including some radio traffic reporters, extend the "Kenilworth Avenue" designation southwest to cover part of what is now designated DC-295. I believe in the District that name technically refers to the service roads but became the common name for the highway because there was no other useful designation for it when it didn't have a number.

I don't know if this one counts because when I was a kid it was a rural two-lane road that has now been rebuilt into a six-lane freeway: Most of Sully Road north of I-66 in Fairfax County, except for a very small segment just north of the Interstate. This is VA-28, the infamous "I-366 with an 85-mph speed limit" of forum lore (for those not familiar, that's a longstanding joke here, and the speed limit is a universally-ignored 55 mph). I say "I don't know if this one counts" because it's not clear to me whether the OP wants freeway-type roads that were built as such but given names as if they were surface streets, or whether roads rebuilt into freeways count. Certainly "Sully Road" was a perfectly normal name for the two-lane road and it's also perfectly normal to leave a road's name in place when it's upgraded. Not too many people still call it by its name, thoughónowadays "Route 28" is more common (with "route" pronounced either way, "rout" or "root," depending on who's speaking).


(Edited to fix a typo. My iPad's autocorrect stubbornly insists on capitalizing "road" most of the time regardless of how I'm using the word, and I usually don't notice it. In this case, it had changed what I typed to read "perfectly normal name for the two-lane Road."  :angry:)


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