AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs  (Read 3117 times)

KEVIN_224

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1388
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 11:28:13 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2018, 09:21:28 AM »

On the opposite side, I remember years ago, at least back to the 90s, KZPS in Dallas, a classic rock station, played unedited Pink Floyd's "Money" with the line "don't give me that do goody good bullshit."  More recently, though, the local stations were silencing the offending word.

At the same time, Steve Miller Band's "Jet Airliner" was played with the line "funky shit goin' down in the city" replaced with the line "funky kicks goin' down in the city."


I believe WAQY did the same.

WAQY-FM 102.1 of Springfield, MA is classic rock station ROCK 102. When they play "Money For Nothing" by Dire Straits, they reverse-edit the word f----t, who has his own jet airplane and is a millionaire. WDRC-FM 102.9 of Hartford, a.k.a. 102.9 The Whale - Hartford's Classic Rock, plays the line unedited. WDRC-FM reverse-edits Roger Daltrey's f-bomb for the other song mentioned. WHCN-FM 105.9 of Hartford, a.k.a. The River 105.9, more or less leaves that line out.
Logged

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12207
  • (Censored by spoilsports. They ruin everything.)

  • Age: 56
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 09:03:10 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2018, 10:57:18 AM »

As a kid, I wore out a vinyl version of Johnny Cash's live San Quentin album. The album was full of bleeps. I can understand bleeping the single version of "A Boy Named Sue," but I never really understood why between-song banter was bleeped, since that was never going to get airplay. I wonder if an unbleeped version of that album was ever released?

Compare that to Bruce Dickinson's introduction of "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" on Iron Maiden's live album that came out in the mid-80s. "The moral of this story is, here's what not to do if a bird sh*ts on you." Or any live Ozzy Osbourne album. LOL
Logged

PHLBOS

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5749
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Greater Philly, PA
  • Last Login: September 21, 2018, 07:37:00 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2018, 11:01:15 AM »

Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1970s, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 12:06:16 PM by PHLBOS »
Logged
GPS does NOT equal GOD

bandit957

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1345
  • A natural gas bunk!

  • Age: 45
  • Location: Bellevue, KY
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 01:38:33 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2018, 11:41:13 AM »

WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

Most stations I've heard skip the second verse, since I think that was a standard edit. Even the old WCLU skipped that verse.

That verse is omitted from the music video as well.

The video used to include the second verse when it first came out. But I haven't seen the video in years.

'American Top 40' (which WKRQ carried) played the version that skipped the second verse. But 'Countdown America' (which WCLU carried) did play the second verse.
Logged
The highway to not having your teeth fall out...

Number of remaining teeth: https://goo.gl/maps/dgsWdCme9s72

BamaZeus

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 274
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Northport, AL
  • Last Login: September 18, 2018, 11:06:05 AM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2018, 12:03:19 PM »

AT40 would play "I'm that type of guy" by LL Cool J and scramble the word "screwed" toward the end.  It kinda sounded like Pig Latin.

Instead of "when I screwed her, you couldn't understand it", you'd hear "When I (ood-scr) her, you couldn't understand it"

Even the official video just cuts it out altogether   2:42 mark 
Logged

kurumi

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1440
  • Location: Cupertino, CA
  • Last Login: Today at 10:53:59 AM
    • kurumi.com
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2018, 12:06:01 PM »

... What you will hear as "got a full *record scratch* in my *record scratch*" on the radio is really just "got a full clip in my pistol-a". Totally acceptable to play on the air, but not to market as kid-friendly since some parents think guns are inappropriate.

Well now what are we going to call the devil?

"Ah tole you once you very bad man ah'm the best that's ever bin"
Logged

OracleUsr

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 787
  • Age: 47
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Last Login: Today at 04:32:59 AM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #31 on: April 14, 2018, 04:01:25 AM »

"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Logged
Anti-center-tabbing, anti-sequential-numbering, anti-Clearview BGS FAN

Rothman

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4020
  • Last Login: Today at 11:37:23 AM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #32 on: April 14, 2018, 10:09:04 AM »

"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Huh.  Never heard that edited version, but I know there was that MIA hit that turned the gunshots to stomps.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Big John

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1614
  • Age: 51
  • Last Login: Today at 11:33:43 AM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #33 on: April 14, 2018, 06:09:01 PM »

"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Huh.  Never heard that edited version, but I know there was that MIA hit that turned the gunshots to stomps.
Paper Planes?
Logged

michravera

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 237
  • Location: Northern California
  • Last Login: September 21, 2018, 11:20:54 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2018, 06:42:26 PM »

Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1974, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.


Charlie Daniels was every bit as religious and rebellious in 1974 as he is now. If anything, calling the devil a "son of a bitch" would confirm his religiosity. If he had gotten more religious, he'd be more adamant about calling the devil a "son of a bitch" now than before!
Logged

Rothman

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4020
  • Last Login: Today at 11:37:23 AM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2018, 08:42:52 PM »

"Pumped up Kicks" by Foster the People.  Some stations silenced "bullet" and "gun" in the chorus (of a song about school shooting)
Huh.  Never heard that edited version, but I know there was that MIA hit that turned the gunshots to stomps.
Paper Planes?
Yep.  I think the stomps actually sounded better.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

jp the roadgeek

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2399
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Outside the I-291 beltway
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 03:41:11 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2018, 11:38:17 PM »

Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1974, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.


Charlie Daniels was every bit as religious and rebellious in 1974 as he is now. If anything, calling the devil a "son of a bitch" would confirm his religiosity. If he had gotten more religious, he'd be more adamant about calling the devil a "son of a bitch" now than before!

The song actually came out in 1979, late in the days of AM music stations; within 5 years, most AM stations would be dedicated to news and talk, unless it was a simulcast of the FM station. 
Logged
Interstates I've clinched: 97, 290 (MA), 291 (CT), 291 (MA), 293, 295 (DE-NJ-PA), 295 (RI-MA), 384, 391, 395 (CT-MA), 395 (MD), 495 (DE), 610 (LA), 684, 691, 695 (MD), 695 (NY), 795 (MD)

Duke87

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5011
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Queens, NY
  • Last Login: Today at 01:44:50 AM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2018, 12:10:02 PM »

As a kid, I wore out a vinyl version of Johnny Cash's live San Quentin album. The album was full of bleeps. I can understand bleeping the single version of "A Boy Named Sue," but I never really understood why between-song banter was bleeped, since that was never going to get airplay. I wonder if an unbleeped version of that album was ever released?

Kind of like Chumbawamba's album Tubthumper. There are various audio clips between the actual songs on the album, some of them feature bleeped expletives. As far as I am aware, no unbleeped version of the album exists. However, the clips that feature bleeps are sampled from a couple of different obscure British movies, which do not feature bleeps natively - so the uncensored audio does exist, but only in the source material.

I've toyed with the idea of trying to chase down copies of these movies so I could rip the uncensored audio and splice it into the Chumbawamba album but... that'd be more effort than it's worth. And not even really doable for the majority of them - most of the samples have added music in the background which would be lost if I swapped them out for rips directly from the movies.
Logged
If you always take the same road, you will never see anything new.

PHLBOS

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5749
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Greater Philly, PA
  • Last Login: September 21, 2018, 07:37:00 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2018, 12:09:45 PM »

The song actually came out in 1979, late in the days of AM music stations; within 5 years, most AM stations would be dedicated to news and talk, unless it was a simulcast of the FM station.
That may have been true for AM stations in New England but in other parts of the country such stations played music longer.

BTW: after doing a bit more checking.  The album version of the song contained b*tch whereas the 45 version (usually played on AM stations) had the word gun.
Logged
GPS does NOT equal GOD

jasonh300

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 41
  • Age: 44
  • Location: New Orleans, LA
  • Last Login: September 16, 2018, 06:23:01 AM
    • 504 Road Trips
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2018, 06:11:38 PM »

WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.

I believe you mean the word meaning "bundle of sticks".  The British word for cigarette is a shortened form of that word.

There was a radio edit of "Money for Nothing" that got played when the song was still in the Top 40 that had that part completely left out.  In later years, the classic rock stations would play the album version.  I haven't heard that song on the radio in years, but I'm guessing that the stations that play it use some kind of edited version to avoid offending anyone.

TheHighwayMan394

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1892
  • Age: 28
  • Location: Twin Ports/North Shore
  • Last Login: Today at 11:39:59 AM
    • Patrick Lilja's Minnesconsin Highways
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #40 on: April 17, 2018, 04:55:54 AM »

There was a radio edit of "Money for Nothing" that got played when the song was still in the Top 40 that had that part completely left out.  In later years, the classic rock stations would play the album version.  I haven't heard that song on the radio in years, but I'm guessing that the stations that play it use some kind of edited version to avoid offending anyone.

It still depends on the station. I heard the uncensored version on Duluth's classic rock station recently (on a Sunday afternoon, so it wasn't a late night "who gives a shit" decision), but a lot of stations probably opt for the shorter version regardless because it means they can fit in more songs - and more importantly, more ads.
Logged
Minnesconsin Highways

Clinched 2dis: 35, 39, 41, 43, 76 (W), 84 (E), 88 (both), 96, 97

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3281
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 04:54:20 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #41 on: April 17, 2018, 05:58:55 AM »

WAQY also cuts the British word for cigarette out of the second verse of "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits.
You mean the British word for a bundle of sticks or delicious ball of off-cuts and offal. There's 6 letters in that word, not three.

The British word for cigarette is just three letters, not 6 - cf the common phrase by malapropic smokers 'can I fum a bag off of you?' (and yes, this is still said with the letters swapped back, despite containing two words that also have definitions that are derogatory towards homosexuals. No one sees it as an anti-gay slur, because it isn't meant as such).

Dire Straits are using the US slur meaning (albeit satirically) in the song and even in the 80s in the UK they were having to censor it - one live performance on TV they used the word 'Queenie' instead after being told they couldn't say the 6-letter word - which was probably a worse slur. Wikipedia says that Canadian radio stations all agreed to ban the uncensored version about 7 years ago.

The autocorrect just says 'cigarette' for the 6-letter word and 'bundle of sticks' for the 3-letter word. While it is wrong in the same way (and needs to be fixed - I think this is the third time I've said the same thing - certainly twice about Money for Nothing), it doesn't say 'British word for'. Don't come to Britain and hand people some sticks if they ask for a cigarette, or think its a pack of smokes if you order cheap-meat balls off a menu!
Logged

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12207
  • (Censored by spoilsports. They ruin everything.)

  • Age: 56
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 09:03:10 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #42 on: April 17, 2018, 11:34:55 AM »

When did they change "f a g" to automatically change to "bundle of sticks" here? I thought it used to be changed to "cigarette."

Guess I should see what the n-word now reverts to.

Addendum: After using the preview function, it still changes to "hep cat."

Are there any other words besides  "f a g" and the n-word that automatically get corrected? I think we've had that discussion before.
Logged

1

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 5713
  • UMass Lowell student

  • Age: 19
  • Location: MA/NH border
  • Last Login: Today at 12:11:12 PM
    • Flickr account
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #43 on: April 17, 2018, 11:49:40 AM »

When did they change "f a g" to automatically change to "bundle of sticks" here? I thought it used to be changed to "cigarette."

Guess I should see what the n-word now reverts to.

Addendum: After using the preview function, it still changes to "hep cat."

Are there any other words besides  "f a g" and the n-word that automatically get corrected? I think we've had that discussion before.

C-word if surrounded by spaces
could οf → could have, same for should οf and would οf
"Sent frοm my" and "using Τapatalk"
Racist ___clown
Logged
Clinched, plus MA 108

Traveled, plus:
US ⒉⒔50
MA ⒐⒙22.40.99.10⒎10⒏1⒒1⒚127.141.15⒐286
NH 27,111A
NY 366
GA 42,140
FL A1A
CT 32

Flickr

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12207
  • (Censored by spoilsports. They ruin everything.)

  • Age: 56
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 09:03:10 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #44 on: April 17, 2018, 12:39:29 PM »

The first and fourth entries on that list make no sense. "Genius" and "mezzanine" for the offending words?

And now I know how those little white pieces of text get inserted into posts -- it's an auto-correct that's set by the admins.
Logged

michravera

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 237
  • Location: Northern California
  • Last Login: September 21, 2018, 11:20:54 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #45 on: April 17, 2018, 03:25:39 PM »

Anyone else remember when "The Devil Went Down To Georgia" had an AM version and an FM version?

I'm aware that there's one version where Johnny calls the Devil a son of a gun and one where he calls the Devil a son of a bitch, I didn't know those were AM and FM versions.
I believe he's inferring that the AM version used gun whereas the FM version used bitch.

The one and only time I heard it, it was an FM station, and it said "gun".
The above-AM/FM reference date back to a time when there was indeed a difference between a song that was played on an AM station vs. it being played on an FM station (usually the distinction was song length as well as content).  When the song came out circa 1974, such was true.

Today such terminology is viewed more as a figure of speech.

A possible reason why one doesn't hear the version with the b-word in it on radio stations anymore may be due to the song author (Charlie Daniels) no longer wanting that version played anymore due to personal/religious convictions.


Charlie Daniels was every bit as religious and rebellious in 1974 as he is now. If anything, calling the devil a "son of a bitch" would confirm his religiosity. If he had gotten more religious, he'd be more adamant about calling the devil a "son of a bitch" now than before!

The song actually came out in 1979, late in the days of AM music stations; within 5 years, most AM stations would be dedicated to news and talk, unless it was a simulcast of the FM station.

But "Uneasy Rider" came out in 1973 or so. This wasn't Charlie's first rodeo.
Logged

SectorZ

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 744
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Tewksbury, MA
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 06:29:41 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #46 on: April 18, 2018, 07:24:54 PM »

Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...
Logged

jp the roadgeek

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2399
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Outside the I-291 beltway
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 03:41:11 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #47 on: April 18, 2018, 09:07:02 PM »

Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
Logged
Interstates I've clinched: 97, 290 (MA), 291 (CT), 291 (MA), 293, 295 (DE-NJ-PA), 295 (RI-MA), 384, 391, 395 (CT-MA), 395 (MD), 495 (DE), 610 (LA), 684, 691, 695 (MD), 695 (NY), 795 (MD)

Henry

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4275
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Chicago, IL/Seattle, WA
  • Last Login: September 21, 2018, 10:01:22 AM
    • Henry Watson's Online Freeway
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #48 on: April 19, 2018, 09:42:02 AM »

Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
What is the difference? To me, they're both the same, like "dammit" and "damn it", with the former basically being a shortened version of the latter (with no space in between).
Logged
Go Cubs Go! Go Cubs Go! Hey Chicago, what do you say? The Cubs are gonna win today!

SectorZ

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 744
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Tewksbury, MA
  • Last Login: September 22, 2018, 06:29:41 PM
Re: Radio stations that banned "dirty" songs
« Reply #49 on: April 19, 2018, 10:58:05 AM »

Not radio, but...

http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/walmart-refuses-to-carry-strypers-new-album-god-damn-evil/

Amazing that they're too stupid to realize the difference between "God Damn" and "Goddamn", which mean 2 totally different things. So embarrassed that I ever worked for them...

That reminds me of another radio edit I once heard:  The line in "Uncle John's Band" by The Grateful Dead that says "God damn, well I declare" being cut to an overdubbed instrumental snippet to a sudden cut-in to "Well I declare".
What is the difference? To me, they're both the same, like "dammit" and "damn it", with the former basically being a shortened version of the latter (with no space in between).

Envision a comma after 'God', though the comma existing or not means the same thing. It's also what Michael Sweet of Stryper tried to explain to people. Stryper is a Christian Metal band.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.