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 1 
 on: Today at 07:50:06 PM 
Started by JoePCool14 - Last post by Scott5114
I've mentioned my distaste for the Project 360 horizontal signals in downtown OKC, which I consider to be a bad idea because the rest of the city uses vertical, even near overpasses, as do most of the suburbs (Mustang is the sole horizontal light jurisdiction, and their conversion was recent). A driver crossing a jurisdictional boundary, especially a state line, might well be expecting a change in the way traffic control devices are installed, but a driver moving from one district to another in the same city probably won't be. I also take issue with the way that the Project 360 signals were designed—the horizontal mounting was decided on by a streetscape designer, not anyone from the city traffic department.

As for Lawton—well, no offense to Bobby5280, but I'd rather not spend enough time in Lawton to become used to it. :-D

Do you have a picture or a link to a picture of any other those Project 360 lights? The way you're describing them reminds me of those weird shiny, oval lights in Houston which I think look terrible.

But of course. They look better than the Houston ones, but these usually come with a nice side of 3/4-errored negative-contrast Clearview for good measure, so it's kind of a wash.

It is described in the design document as a "contemporary | minimalist | elegant | stainless steel | rectangular pole" (punctuation as in original).

 2 
 on: Today at 07:47:57 PM 
Started by ZLoth - Last post by ftballfan
I started a new job at the end of March and I've been in the office five days a week the entire time (except for a day and a half working from home for non-job reasons). My coworkers and I have separate cubicles which are all separated from each other by well over six feet. I much prefer working in the office as the programs run much faster there and I have three monitors. Side note: I've been vaccinated since April as my sister and I signed up for vaccines as soon as eligibility opened to our age group. Speaking of my sister, her workplace reopened the offices a few weeks ago, so she goes into the office between once and twice per week. She prefers working from home as she gets to work with her four-pawed coworker and she has a lot of video calls every day.

 3 
 on: Today at 07:41:06 PM 
Started by jakeroot - Last post by jakeroot
That graphic came from the Facebook Post from the former WSDOT North Spokesperson.

They nixed the flyover early in the design process, as it was inadequate for growing demand and the costs associated with it.  The biggest problem is that the original design had a fly under for eastbound traffic, which was removed in the final design.  That being said, the overall design has been perfect, just the poor drivers coming from the West who can't read signs, lane markings, or traffic movements are the problem.  The crashes are also far less severe than those from the light, which were often T-bones, instead of side-swipes.

WSDOT needs to just keep it as is, and if anything, remove an eastbound lane, rather than a southbound lane.

What's their name? Is it a public post?

Unfortunately, though the bolded statement may be true, there is a significant amount of evidence that this is the case at virtually all multi-lane roundabouts country-wide, and the engineers should have known this would be a problem. I'm sure engineers and planners are totally stumped by this. I know I am. But it's true, pretty much everywhere. The only multi-lane roundabouts that seem to work are 2x1 roundabouts, where each crossover has no more than three paths crossing (as opposed to the current eastbound entrance, which has four paths crossing (2 over 2)).

The crashes may be less severe, but I may argue the total economic loss is actually greater. Even the most minor crashes usually involve some level of insurance claim, and can also negatively affect vehicle values. Crashes are expensive, and we shouldn't be constructing intersections that routinely cause them. Especially when the old intersection did not have a history of major crashes.

For the record: T-Bone collisions are absolutely possible at roundabouts, but especially multi-lane roundabouts. All drivers have to do is ignore the lane lines (say, by failing to notice the approaching roundabout) and head straight-on into circulating traffic. It's actually quite easy. If drivers followed the rules, of course this wouldn't be the case. But if drivers followed rules, we wouldn't have crashes now, would we?!?!




WSDOT could reduce the eastbound entry to one lane, but that would decrease SR-20 Spur to SR-20 to one lane in each direction, half the capacity of the original signal (and then some...traffic is moving slower now as well). Factor in the possibility for continued crashes with less capacity, and we're left with...well:


 4 
 on: Today at 07:37:14 PM 
Started by jakeroot - Last post by jakeroot
Makes me wonder how we'll handle the SR 9/SR 204 roundabout in Lake Stevens. The amount of traffic it has to handle is going to make it an amusing sight.

SR 9/SR 204 Intersection Preferred Alternative Design by Washington State Dept of Transportation, on Flickr

It'll probably handle the traffic quite well, but there will be a significant number of crashes. WSDOT will make minor modifications, but it'll likely become a crash hotspot. Most multi-lane roundabouts are crash hotspots.

 5 
 on: Today at 07:28:46 PM 
Started by Brandon - Last post by ftballfan
I just went into the last remaining Kmart store in the state of Michigan which is located in Marshall. Serious lack of energy, and nothing has changed from the last time I was in a Kmart store. There are a few customers, empty shelf space, dead areas of the store. Talk about a company that is lost in the 90s. They were still using IBM monitors at their checkout lanes too.

I bought a pop on the way out just so I can say I bought something. By the way John was a very strange individual, he talked very loud and wanted me to help out St Jude's which I didn't.
The only reason why they're still open is that the nearest Meijer and Walmart are 10+ miles away, on the south side of Battle Creek. Before the first bankruptcy, there used to be a Kmart in Albion as well. Fun unrelated fact: Marshall and Albion schools consolidated a few years back, but Albion is nowhere to be mentioned in the district's name (likely due to Albion being a town in decline whose schools were about to be shut down by Rick Snyder prior to its consolidation with Marshall)

 6 
 on: Today at 07:27:58 PM 
Started by JoePCool14 - Last post by SkyPesos
Kind of curious, how would horizontal traffic signals be angled on a mast arm, for like left turns on a SPUI offramp? Would it be dangled a bit below the mast arm?

 7 
 on: Today at 07:24:54 PM 
Started by JoePCool14 - Last post by JoePCool14
I've mentioned my distaste for the Project 360 horizontal signals in downtown OKC, which I consider to be a bad idea because the rest of the city uses vertical, even near overpasses, as do most of the suburbs (Mustang is the sole horizontal light jurisdiction, and their conversion was recent). A driver crossing a jurisdictional boundary, especially a state line, might well be expecting a change in the way traffic control devices are installed, but a driver moving from one district to another in the same city probably won't be. I also take issue with the way that the Project 360 signals were designed—the horizontal mounting was decided on by a streetscape designer, not anyone from the city traffic department.

As for Lawton—well, no offense to Bobby5280, but I'd rather not spend enough time in Lawton to become used to it. :-D

Do you have a picture or a link to a picture of any other those Project 360 lights? The way you're describing them reminds me of those weird shiny, oval lights in Houston which I think look terrible.

 8 
 on: Today at 07:20:08 PM 
Started by agentsteel53 - Last post by SkyPesos
Wish they'd take the GSV cars for another comprehensive whirl again. Most US places have imagery from 2019, it seems like. Newest I can find is November 2020. If anyone has anything newer, please link it.
Probably the pandemic slowing things down.
Google lists the states and counties they're visiting for StreetView tours on their site (scroll down a bit to see the list).

 9 
 on: Today at 07:18:15 PM 
Started by roadman65 - Last post by bing101
Wow this song has some late 1980-early 1990's vibe to this. Yes John Mayer's Last Train Home is basically Toto meets Eric Clapton and if they did came together in 1989-1991 timeframe


 10 
 on: Today at 07:15:34 PM 
Started by tolbs17 - Last post by Max Rockatansky
Wilkins Coffee ads. 


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