driving to high elevations in Mt. Rainier National Park will require reservation

Started by kkt, January 30, 2024, 10:20:44 PM

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kkt

E-mail from the Park today:

QuoteHello!
Thanks again for your interest in the Mount Rainier NP Nisqually Corridor Planning project. This summer the park has decided to test some of the strategies from the Draft Plan. We heard from many members of the public during our comment period that this "pilot test" of a timed-entry reservations system for some areas of the park could be useful both for park users, park managers and other interested parties. Therefore, the NPS will be pilot testing these strategies this summer. After completing the pilot this summer and evaluating outcomes, we expect to issue a decision on the Plan/EA in winter 2024/5.

Here's what you need to know:
May 24 through September 2  timed entry reservations are required to enter the Paradise Corridor on the south side of the park from 7:00 am to 3:00 pm.
July 3 through September 2  timed entry reservations are required to enter the Sunrise Corridor on the northeast side of the park from 7:00 am to 3:00 pm.
Visitors entering the park in a vehicle or on a motorcycle in one of these areas during these dates need two things: 
A timed entry reservation OR service reservation (lodging, camping, wilderness permit, etc.) , AND
Park Entrance Fee OR valid Park Pass (Annual, Senior, Military, etc.). See the FAQ page for details.
Visitors with other in-park reservations (e.g. wilderness permits, lodging reservations, campground reservations) do not need a timed entry reservation in addition.
The park is open 24/7 and visitors may enter timed entry reservation areas before 7:00 am or after 3:00 pm without a reservation. Learn more about visiting without a reservation.
Additional information and FAQs can be found at: Timed Entry Reservations - Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service) (nps.gov)

Thanks again for you interest!


Henry

Is there any idea on how much a reservation will cost?

(BTW, visiting Mt. Rainier is on the top of my bucket list; it's hard to believe I've never toured it in the 23 years that I've lived in Seattle!)
Go Cubs Go! Go Cubs Go! Hey Chicago, what do you say? The Cubs are gonna win today!

kkt

Quote from: Henry on January 30, 2024, 11:24:41 PM
Is there any idea on how much a reservation will cost?

(BTW, visiting Mt. Rainier is on the top of my bucket list; it's hard to believe I've never toured it in the 23 years that I've lived in Seattle!)

The reservations are $2 each.  Here's a link to the FAQ with that and other details:
https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/timed-entry-reservations-faq.htm

triplemultiplex

Loving our National Parks to death.
Even more true today than when Ken Burns dedicated an entire segment to it in that series they seem to re-air every pledge drive on PBS.
"That's just like... your opinion, man."

Papa Emeritus

Quote from: triplemultiplex on January 31, 2024, 10:06:39 AM
Loving our National Parks to death.
Even more true today than when Ken Burns dedicated an entire segment to it in that series they seem to re-air every pledge drive on PBS.

Loving SOME of our national parks to death.

The most popular parks, like Arches, Great Smoky, Rocky Mountain, Yellowstone, and Yosemite, are choking on crowds, in part because some people want to have their pictures taken there just to generate lots of likes on social media.

There are many beautiful parks that are still relatively uncrowded, like Theodore Roosevelt in North Dakota, where people can hike in near-solitude. The extreme case is Isle Royale in Lake Superior, which, because it takes a long boat ride to reach, gets fewer visitors in a year than Great Smoky gets in an hour or two.

Although parks like Theodore Roosevelt and Isle Royale don't have the "brand name recognition" of the Grand Canyon, the scenery at these parks is still amazing. These parks, and many others, are waiting to be discovered if people put in an effort to learn about them.

Rothman

Quote from: Papa Emeritus on January 31, 2024, 11:50:17 AM
Quote from: triplemultiplex on January 31, 2024, 10:06:39 AM
Loving our National Parks to death.
Even more true today than when Ken Burns dedicated an entire segment to it in that series they seem to re-air every pledge drive on PBS.

Loving SOME of our national parks to death.

The most popular parks, like Arches, Great Smoky, Rocky Mountain, Yellowstone, and Yosemite, are choking on crowds, in part because some people want to have their pictures taken there just to generate lots of likes on social media.

There are many beautiful parks that are still relatively uncrowded, like Theodore Roosevelt in North Dakota, where people can hike in near-solitude. The extreme case is Isle Royale in Lake Superior, which, because it takes a long boat ride to reach, gets fewer visitors in a year than Great Smoky gets in an hour or two.

Although parks like Theodore Roosevelt and Isle Royale don't have the "brand name recognition" of the Grand Canyon, the scenery at these parks is still amazing. These parks, and many others, are waiting to be discovered if people put in an effort to learn about them.
Visitation is on the rise for all of them.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Max Rockatansky


kalvado

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:26:38 PM
How dare people enjoy popular outdoor parklands.
Popular spots cannot bear out their popularity. And unlike a popular business, digging another grand canyon isn't really an option. Same thing happens with museums, and even cities (Amsterdam and Venice come to mind)
My personal opinion is that there are too many people. And looks like there is a general acceptance of that idea with population predictions flatline or inching down.
I don't know what are the proper ma

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: kalvado on January 31, 2024, 12:47:49 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:26:38 PM
How dare people enjoy popular outdoor parklands.
Popular spots cannot bear out their popularity. And unlike a popular business, digging another grand canyon isn't really an option. Same thing happens with museums, and even cities (Amsterdam and Venice come to mind)
My personal opinion is that there are too many people. And looks like there is a general acceptance of that idea with population predictions flatline or inching down.
I don't know what are the proper ma

What is interesting to me is that the recent spike in park visitation seems to have been borne out of the "safer on trail" mindset/movement during 2020.  I'm kind of surprised it hasn't somewhat leveled off given other forms of recreation are available again.

I've always been kind of okay just having to out compete tourists to places like Yosemite during popular months.  I see a 7 AM reservation start time as being highly exploitable for locals wanting to get up Paradise early in the morning.  I was doing much of the same with the 7 AM reservation start time with Yosemite in 2020.  I usually get up super early to beat traffic to trailheads anyways. 

Rothman

Quote from: kalvado on January 31, 2024, 12:47:49 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:26:38 PM
How dare people enjoy popular outdoor parklands.
Popular spots cannot bear out their popularity. And unlike a popular business, digging another grand canyon isn't really an option. Same thing happens with museums, and even cities (Amsterdam and Venice come to mind)
My personal opinion is that there are too many people. And looks like there is a general acceptance of that idea with population predictions flatline or inching down.
I don't know what are the proper ma
Somebody kidnapped kalvado midsentence.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 12:54:58 PM
Quote from: kalvado on January 31, 2024, 12:47:49 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:26:38 PM
How dare people enjoy popular outdoor parklands.
Popular spots cannot bear out their popularity. And unlike a popular business, digging another grand canyon isn't really an option. Same thing happens with museums, and even cities (Amsterdam and Venice come to mind)
My personal opinion is that there are too many people. And looks like there is a general acceptance of that idea with population predictions flatline or inching down.
I don't know what are the proper ma
Somebody kidnapped kalvado midsentence.

Maybe the Sierra Club got to him by mistake thinking it was me.

kphoger

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:53:43 PM
What is interesting to me is that the recent spike in park visitation seems to have been borne out of the "safer on trail" mindset/movement during 2020.  I'm kind of surprised it hasn't somewhat leveled off given other forms of recreation are available again.

I've wondered about that too.
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

kalvado

Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 12:54:58 PM
Quote from: kalvado on January 31, 2024, 12:47:49 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:26:38 PM
How dare people enjoy popular outdoor parklands.
Popular spots cannot bear out their popularity. And unlike a popular business, digging another grand canyon isn't really an option. Same thing happens with museums, and even cities (Amsterdam and Venice come to mind)
My personal opinion is that there are too many people. And looks like there is a general acceptance of that idea with population predictions flatline or inching down.
I don't know what are the proper ma
Somebody kidnapped kalvado midsentence.
Just a quch interview with... Oh sorry, they are ba

Rothman

Quote from: kalvado on January 31, 2024, 02:46:32 PM
Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 12:54:58 PM
Quote from: kalvado on January 31, 2024, 12:47:49 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:26:38 PM
How dare people enjoy popular outdoor parklands.
Popular spots cannot bear out their popularity. And unlike a popular business, digging another grand canyon isn't really an option. Same thing happens with museums, and even cities (Amsterdam and Venice come to mind)
My personal opinion is that there are too many people. And looks like there is a general acceptance of that idea with population predictions flatline or inching down.
I don't know what are the proper ma
Somebody kidnapped kalvado midsentence.
Just a quch interview with... Oh sorry, they are ba
O.o

Look, whatever happens in your bedroom is your own business.  No need to post it on here, Charo.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

GaryV

Quote from: kphoger on January 31, 2024, 01:37:48 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:53:43 PM
What is interesting to me is that the recent spike in park visitation seems to have been borne out of the "safer on trail" mindset/movement during 2020.  I'm kind of surprised it hasn't somewhat leveled off given other forms of recreation are available again.

I've wondered about that too.

Simple. People who had never done it before, but tried it pandemic-time, found out what it was all about and liked it and kept it up.

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: GaryV on January 31, 2024, 03:11:49 PM
Quote from: kphoger on January 31, 2024, 01:37:48 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:53:43 PM
What is interesting to me is that the recent spike in park visitation seems to have been borne out of the "safer on trail" mindset/movement during 2020.  I'm kind of surprised it hasn't somewhat leveled off given other forms of recreation are available again.

I've wondered about that too.

Simple. People who had never done it before, but tried it pandemic-time, found out what it was all about and liked it and kept it up.

I can't find fault in people discovering the outdoors and genuinely finding enjoyment in it.  I'll still try my damn hardest to avoid them though like all the rest. 

Rothman



Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 04:20:28 PM
Quote from: GaryV on January 31, 2024, 03:11:49 PM
Quote from: kphoger on January 31, 2024, 01:37:48 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 12:53:43 PM
What is interesting to me is that the recent spike in park visitation seems to have been borne out of the "safer on trail" mindset/movement during 2020.  I'm kind of surprised it hasn't somewhat leveled off given other forms of recreation are available again.

I've wondered about that too.

Simple. People who had never done it before, but tried it pandemic-time, found out what it was all about and liked it and kept it up.

I can't find fault in people discovering the outdoors and genuinely finding enjoyment in it.

I can.  If it's not their fault, whose is it?

Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

kphoger

Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 04:26:27 PM

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 04:20:28 PM
I can't find fault in people discovering the outdoors and genuinely finding enjoyment in it.

I can.  If it's not their fault, whose is it?

It's not a fault to begin with.
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

Rothman

Quote from: kphoger on January 31, 2024, 04:28:16 PM
Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 04:26:27 PM

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 04:20:28 PM
I can't find fault in people discovering the outdoors and genuinely finding enjoyment in it.

I can.  If it's not their fault, whose is it?

It's not a fault to begin with.
Sure it is.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

hotdogPi

If there's a mountain there, there's probably a fault. That's how mountains form.
Clinched

Traveled, plus 13, 44, and 50, and several state routes

New:
I-189 clinched
US 7, VT 2A, 11, 15,  17, 73, 103, 116, 125, NH 123 traveled

kalvado

Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 05:00:00 PM
Quote from: kphoger on January 31, 2024, 04:28:16 PM
Quote from: Rothman on January 31, 2024, 04:26:27 PM

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on January 31, 2024, 04:20:28 PM
I can't find fault in people discovering the outdoors and genuinely finding enjoyment in it.

I can.  If it's not their fault, whose is it?

It's not a fault to begin with.
Sure it is.
Only me and Max should be allowed to enjoy outdoors, you should stay at home. There is nothing there to see anyway.

kphoger

Quote from: 1 on January 31, 2024, 05:02:01 PM
If there's a mountain there, there's probably a fault. That's how mountains form.

Quit dropping the mic like that.  It's bad for the equipment.
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

GaryV

Quote from: 1 on January 31, 2024, 05:02:01 PM
If there's a mountain there, there's probably a fault. That's how mountains form.

It's a volcano. It doesn't necessarily need a fault.

kkt

Quote from: 1 on January 31, 2024, 05:02:01 PM
If there's a mountain there, there's probably a fault. That's how mountains form.

Some of them - Like Mt. Rainier just to take a random example - form by volcanoes.

pderocco

Way back when I used to hike a lot, it was always the case that you didn't have to hike very far to get away from the crowds. You wouldn't find absolute solitude, but it wouldn't be crowded. Check out the "street view" of the Bright Angel and South Kaibab trails in the Grand Canyon, even only half a mile down the trail. There are people here and there, but that thin traffic never bothered me. I just visited the South Rim a couple months ago, and it was mobbed. Since I wasn't there to hike, I bailed after snapping a few pics. But I don't begrudge all those tourists their chance to photograph the views. That's pretty much all they do.



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