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CA-299 to Nevada border?

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kkt:
I read here:

http://gbcnet.com/ushighways/US299/index.html

that US-299 east end was at US-395 in Alturas.  It was later that California extended CA-299 to the Nevada border, where it turns into a dirt road.

Why was it important for California to build this paved road to the Nevada border?  I can see that it would have been desirable to have a state route over the hills from Alturas to Cedarville, but why didn't it end at Cedarville?  Did California think that Nevada was going to build a paved road to meet it?

NE2:
It was added to the state highway system in 1921. There is a decent-quality unpaved road in Nevada.

roadfro:
The unpaved road that CA 299 meets at the Nevada state line is former NV 8A. This road was removed from the Nevada route system with the 1976 renumbering.

This portion of 8A travels through the now very sparsely populated northwest corner of the state...the ghost town of Vya is all that's really left in this area.

Perhaps the thought from California was that there would be more settlement in this part of Nevada, and that NDOT would eventually make a paved NV 8A connection to CA 299? What ended up happening in the highway realm SR 140 replacing much of 8A and curving north to Oregon instead of following the former trek west to California, as part of the "Winnemucca to the Sea Highway" effort.

Quillz:
Is this the only example of a state route being longer than the US Route it replaced? In most other cases, former US Routes become shorter state routes.

NE2:

--- Quote from: Quillz on March 11, 2012, 09:24:20 PM ---Is this the only example of a state route being longer than the US Route it replaced? In most other cases, former US Routes become shorter state routes.

--- End quote ---
MD 213 is longer than the post-1948 route of US 213 (after US 50 replaced part).

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