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Author Topic: I-69 Ohio River Bridge  (Read 366462 times)

ShawnP

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #125 on: May 13, 2013, 03:34:41 PM »

A new bridge is badly needed as US-41 backs up now and with more I-69 traffic it will really back up.
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US 41

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #126 on: May 14, 2013, 08:02:05 AM »

Kentucky already said it was not affordable. It is last on their priorities. They are actualy considering making a small bypas around Henderson and using the US 41 bridges. KY simply doesn't have the 2 billion dollars to build it and they have have greater priorities then building a bridge that already exists on US 41.
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thefro

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #127 on: May 28, 2013, 07:23:17 PM »

Congressmen: I-69 bridge will require 'creative' funding

Quote
EVANSVILLE — Leaders from both Indiana and Kentucky say they’ll have to get creative to find money for the planned I-69 bridge that would link the two states.

A group of elected officials and I-69 proponents met Tuesday at the Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana for an initial talk about how to come up with the estimated $1.2 billion the bridge will require.

I-69 is open in segments, with others yet to be built. In the big picture, the interstate is envisioned as one that would run across the United States from Canada to Mexico. The planned I-69 bridge under discussion Tuesday would span the Ohio River between Evansville and Henderson, Ky.

U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, a Republican who represents Kentucky’s First Congressional District, said funding is tight at all levels of government, from local to state and federal.

“We recognize that there is simply not enough money there to meet all our infrastructure needs, so we are exploring other options,” Whitfield said.

U.S. Rep. Larry Bucshon, a Republican who represents Indiana’s Eighth Congressional District, agreed.

“We all know that government dollars are tight,” Bucshon said.

One possible idea, Bucshon said, is a public/private partnership that would involve private investors putting up some of the money for the project. Making the bridge a toll bridge is another possibility, Bucshon said.

Bucshon characterized Tuesday’s meeting as “a preliminary discussion” only, and neither he nor Whitfield could say how much of the total cost might come from private funding.

Whitfield also noted that, while Indiana’s state laws allow public/private partnerships for such projects, Kentucky’s currently do not.

Others involved in the meeting included Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke, Henderson Mayor Steve Austin and numerous others.

Winnecke said the I-69 bridge is essential if the highway is to fulfill its economic development potential for this region.

“Without it, Evansville simply becomes a cul-de-sac for southbound traffic,” Winnecke said.
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theline

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #128 on: May 29, 2013, 05:50:40 PM »

Quote
“Without it, Evansville simply becomes a cul-de-sac for southbound traffic,” Winnecke said.

 :clap:
Great line from Evansville's mayor.

If they can get some creative funding going and start this project, pressure will build on Tennessee's pols to get their portion moving, to finish the road from Indy to Memphis.
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #129 on: June 09, 2013, 10:58:37 PM »

David Dixon, editor of the Henderson Gleaner, seconds the call for creating the bi-state authority in this editorial. He also injects a sense of urgency to do so because of perceived competition for funding with the replacement for the Brent Spence bridge in the Cincinnati area:
Quote
We're not talking about moving dirt or even making drawings, but creating the bi-state commission that needs to be set up before anything else can happen. Let's get it done .... There's another reason to act now.
With plans for two new bridges in the Louisville area moving forward, it looks like the next emphasis by the powers that be will be on either our bridge or one replacing the Brent Spence Bridge connecting Northern Kentucky with Cincinnati.

Competing for attention with a big town like Cincinnati and Kentucky's Golden Triangle will be tough. Working in our favor is what seems to be a realization down here that in this day and age it's not going to happen without putting tolls on the bridge ....

Dixon continues his call for a sense of urgency in a June 9 editorial:

Quote
When, if ever, will we see some kind of real action, even preliminary, on getting a new Interstate 69 bridge built between Henderson and Evansville?
A big powwow was held in Evansville last month with politicians and business leaders from both states in attendance. One characterized the meeting as “a preliminary discussion.” Seems like we’ve had quite a few of those already.
The federal government’s not going to build a bridge by itself. State money is just as tight. Public/private partnerships that have raised funds for highway projects in Indiana are not allowed by current Kentucky law.
The idea of putting tolls on a new bridge was brought up as a possibility at the recent meeting. Tolls are more than a possibility. They’re a necessity.
The planning should commence with building a toll bridge as a given.
We paid tolls on Kentucky parkways for years and everybody got around OK. I never knew of anybody skipping their Destin vacation because they had to pony up at the toll booth on the Pennyrile. Or missing a meal at the Moonlight in Owensboro because of tolls on the Audubon.
It’s going to take some kind of combination of tolls, federal, state and maybe private money to get a bridge built and open up northwest Kentucky (and southwest Indiana) to the economic growth that an interstate highway would bring ....
Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke had a good line at the May meeting, saying that without a bridge Interstate 69 becomes “a cul-de-sac” in our area.
A cul-de-sac can be a nice place to have your house, quieter, less traffic. It’s not so good a place to put your business.
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Captain Jack

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #130 on: June 11, 2013, 11:56:54 AM »

I think the Ohio River Bridge needs to be cancelled. People have been driving the US 41 bridge for years. Who cares if it doesn't have wide enough shoulders? If you can't stay in your lane you shouldn't be driving. Eventually when the bridges need redone, you can put them under construction an do what their doing in Louisville. Building brand new bridges would be a waste of money.

Are you aware that the Evansville-Henderson metro is the largest metro by far on the Ohio and even Mississippi River with a single highway crossing?

It may seem adequate to the casual traveler from Terre Haute passing through on the weekend, but there can be serious backups during the week. This is problematic for the thousands of people who must cross it daily for work and school requirements, not to mention medical issues.

I have never heard your claim that a short bypass and utilizing the current bridges is being considered. I do think a fairly quick and adequate temporary solution would be to build a couple of overpasses along the Henderson strip and create an urban freeway through there. Similar to what was done with US 231 in Huntsville for example. Fixing the strip and closing the grade crossings at Wolf Hills on the KY side and Waterworks Road on the Indiana side would eliminate most of the accidents which now back up the traffic and would provide a limited access route for 69 while the new bridge is being worked out.

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codyg1985

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #131 on: June 11, 2013, 12:08:22 PM »

I have never heard your claim that a short bypass and utilizing the current bridges is being considered. I do think a fairly quick and adequate temporary solution would be to build a couple of overpasses along the Henderson strip and create an urban freeway through there. Similar to what was done with US 231 in Huntsville for example. Fixing the strip and closing the grade crossings at Wolf Hills on the KY side and Waterworks Road on the Indiana side would eliminate most of the accidents which now back up the traffic and would provide a limited access route for 69 while the new bridge is being worked out.

There would barely be enough room to do even what is done with US 231 in Huntsville, which is not constructed to interstate standards. A lot of businesses would either have to be relocated or bulldozed in order to make room for something that is adequate for through I-69 traffic.
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Cody Goodman
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Captain Jack

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #132 on: June 11, 2013, 12:21:53 PM »

Yes, there is barely enough room, but you could get 4 lanes up in the air with a couple of one way frontage lanes. I agree, it wouldn't be interstate standards, but would serve as an adequate temporary fix until the can get the funding for the new bridges. Just sign it US 41/Temp. 69
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Revive 755

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #133 on: June 11, 2013, 06:37:39 PM »

Yes, there is barely enough room, but you could get 4 lanes up in the air with a couple of one way frontage lanes. I agree, it wouldn't be interstate standards, but would serve as an adequate temporary fix until the can get the funding for the new bridges. Just sign it US 41/Temp. 69

The temporary fix would likely cost more than the permanent facility; bridges are not cheap, and there are still likely to be some ROW and easements required.
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #134 on: June 11, 2013, 11:00:00 PM »

http://www.in.gov/ifa/files/RFQ__for__I-69_Section_5.pdf
The Indiana Finance Authority has released the RFQ for Section 5
Final ROD from FHWA is expected in July 2013.  INDOT's going to start buying the needed ROW once that completes.
One of the project goals is "Achieve substantial completion for the Project by Fall 2016", which is a pretty aggressive time frame.  I would assume that would mean all the new overpasses/interchanges are open to traffic, stoplights removed, new lanes open etc, but there might still be some cleanup work to do in 2017 before they could sign the whole thing as I-69 to Martinsville.
(above quote from Update on I-69 Extension in Indiana thread)
This article reports that Gary Valentine, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s new project manager for Interstate 69, told the Henderson Chamber of Commerce that several projects over the next two to three years on both the Pennyrile and Purchase Parkways will allow I-69 shields to be installed from Mayfield to Henderson
(above quote from I-69 in KY thread)
from the current six-year highway plan:
PROJECT REVIEW TO LOCATE ALIGNMENT FOR INTERSTATE 69 AROUND HENDERSON FROM E.T. BREATHITT PARKWAY (PENNYRILE PARKWAY) TO OHIO RIVER CROSSING. (I-69 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT). (10CCR) D $1 million, 2012
(above quote from I-69 Ohio River Bridge thread)
... I emailed ... KYTC ... about the extent of progress on the above project [and their reply]:
Quote
The project you referenced in your question is in the early stages of planning.  The Recommended Highway Plan has money set aside for its construction in 2019.  This is a target construction date and at this time we are uncertain as to if that date is realistic or not.
(above quote from I-69 in KY thread)
In the recently completed I-69 Innovative Financing Study Final Findings and the Executive Summary, the Final Findings set forth a standalone traffic and toll analysis for the I-69 Ohio River Bridge (pp. 26-27, 45 of pdf; pp. 21-22, 40 of document)

Reading the above tea leaves in this thread, and the Indiana and Kentucky threads, I think the current thinking may be to have significant progress on the I-69 Ohio River Bridge in the 2018-2020 time frame. In the meantime, I think the message will continue to be hammered home that tolls are an essential part of the bridge project. A 2018-2020 target could be pushed back by Indiana Gov. Pence's stated commitment in this May 23 article to finish I-69 to Indianapolis without tolls:

Quote
“I want to be clear ­today. I am firmly committed to completing I-69 from Evansville to Indianapolis,” Pence said to applause from a couple of hundred contractors, designers and financial firms at an Indiana Government Center South ­forum on how to take part in construction of the next section of I-69 to be built.
That’s a 21-mile section from Bloomington to Martinsville.
But Pence said the job won’t be done until the ­interstate links to I-465 in Marion County, allowing I-69 to fi­nally stretch from Evansville in the south to the Michigan border north of Fort Wayne. While I-69 has long connected Indianapolis to northeastern Indiana, the southern leg remained just a dream ­until Gov. Mitch Daniels launched it during his ­administration.
“The message here ­today is we’re going to finish what we started,” Pence told reporters. “And we’re going to use all the resources that we have at our disposal to do that in a way that serves the interests of taxpayers and is efficient and effective and under budget.”
Pence said there are no plans for tolls on the highway. “It’s certainly not in our proposal or our thinking at this time . . . and we’re not advocating for that.”
He said completing I-69 is a higher priority for him than other transportation projects, including widening I-70 and building the so-called Commerce Connector south and east of Marion County.

With Indiana's share of the bridge project in the neighborhood of $305 million, and Pence's current commitment to build the I-69 Martinsville to Indianapolis segment without tolls, tolls would have to finance a significant percentage of Indiana's share in order to meet a 2018-2020 time frame. 
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #135 on: June 12, 2013, 10:03:55 AM »

In the recently completed I-69 Innovative Financing Study Final Findings and the Executive Summary, the Final Findings set forth a standalone traffic and toll analysis for the I-69 Ohio River Bridge .... With Indiana's share of the bridge project in the neighborhood of $305 million, and Pence's current commitment to build the I-69 Martinsville to Indianapolis segment without tolls, tolls would have to finance a significant percentage of Indiana's share in order to meet a 2018-2020 time frame.

On pages 47-49/122 of the Final Findings (pages 42-44 of the document), an analysis is performed under three scenarios to determine what percentage of the bridge's project cost could be covered by innovative financing.  The three scenarios and the percentage covered by innovative financing:

1. Base Case: This case assumes the SIU’s financing is solely supported by toll revenues. 71%.

2. Case 1: Under this case, the security for the bonds and the TIFIA loan are enhanced by a contractual obligation of the State DOT to pay operations, maintenance and rehabilitation, and replacement expenses to the extent toll revenues are not sufficient. This back‐up obligation or “credit enhancement” allows the bonds and TIFIA loan to be secured by a pledge of gross toll revenues. 90%.

3. Case 2: This case improves on Case 1 by adding a full secondary lien security or legal pledge to the debt from a high credit worthy nontoll revenue source(s) such as a state transportation trust fund or a state’s full faith and credit. This significantly improves the SIU’s credit rating to an assumed ‘AA‐’ that results in additional project debt proceeds. 100%.

From having to come up with approximately $85 million in a toll-only base case scenario to having the project financed entirely through alternative innovative financing in the Case 2 scenario, it seems like Indiana could definitely meet the 2018-2020 time frame independently of whatever progress may or may not be occurring on the Martinsville to Indianapolis section of I-69.
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thefro

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #136 on: June 12, 2013, 10:14:50 AM »

Here's what I think has to happen to get this done:
- Kentucky passes a law allowing a P3 for the I-69 bridge project
- Indiana, Kentucky and private company jointly enter into a P3 agreement to design, build, finance,  maintain, and collect tolls
- Private company gets X amount up front & during construction in milestone payments from IN & KY and whatever Federal funding can be found.
- IN & KY both pass laws that create a tax district in Evansville/Henderson MSA.  Revenue is collected via some combination  of taxes/fees.  I'd probably have the majority of the money coming from fees for vehicle registration (more for commerical vehicles, less for normal ones).  All that would go into an investment fund like Indiana is doing with Major Moves 2020, ran by the Indiana Finance Authority & whatever the KY equivalent is.  I'd also consider a smaller fee spread out throughout SW IN/NW KY to add to that (much like how Marion County, IN has a higher amusement tax to pay for Lucas Oil Stadium and the suburb counties also got a smaller tax increase).
- Tolls would be collected on the bridge via electronic tolling.  Everyone in the Evansville/Henderson MSA would be credited per vehicle for the fee they had already paid (i.e., if fee was $100 per vehicle, they'd get $100 in their account each year).  After that gets depleted you'd get charged for tolls on the bridge.  You could also go with reduced tolls for people in the MSA, but I think this would be a fairer way to do it and also would encourage people to use the new road instead of the existing bridge crossing.

The private company gets paid off over the duration of the contract by a combination of:
- The state funding from IN & KY up front and whatever Federal money can also be used (probably should be around 1/3rd of the cost)
- Tolls on the bridge
- Tax revenue from the new Evansville/Henderson MSA tax district and investment money
- Various other state/federal funding if tolls + tax revenue district combined weren't enough to cover the payment to the private company

I would also make sure there is an option to buy the private company out and remove the tolls if Federal funding could be found to pay off the rest of the bridge, or if there was enough revenue from the tax district to pay off the bridge.

Basically this way you can split the cost so that Evansville itself picks up more of the tab.  They're the ones who will benefit economically from the bridge but they're probably not driving to Henderson *that* much to cover the cost with tolls.  The State of Indiana doesn't have to pay more than its fair share (for a bridge that people from Indiana probably won't use that much).  Kentucky gets some help so they don't have to pay for 2/3rds of the bridge alone, and hopefully the people in Henderson don't get completely hammered on tolls.  This setup should avoid some of the issues that probably will arise with the tolls on the Ohio River Bridges project in Louisville (i.e. people from S. Indiana paying most of the tolls when they commute to work & back, Louisville residents discouraged from traveling into Indiana).
« Last Edit: June 12, 2013, 10:20:39 AM by thefro »
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #137 on: June 16, 2013, 08:53:10 PM »

Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke wants leaders in both Evansville, Indiana and Henderson, Kentucky to repeatedly stress the importance of the I-69 Ohio River Bridge to their respective congressional delegations in order to eventually get federal money/assistance to make the bridge a reality:
Quote
concerning the challenges of securing funds for an I-69 bridge across the Ohio River from Evansville to Henderson, Winnecke said, "each community needs to be lobbying our respective congressional delegations to make sure this is a priority for both Henderson and Evansville." ....
this editorial ... perceived competition for funding with the replacement for the Brent Spence bridge in the Cincinnati area:
Quote
There's another reason to act now. With plans for two new bridges in the Louisville area moving forward, it looks like the next emphasis by the powers that be will be on either our bridge or one replacing the Brent Spence Bridge connecting Northern Kentucky with Cincinnati.
Competing for attention with a big town like Cincinnati and Kentucky's Golden Triangle will be tough.

U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell's office has issued a June 12 press release about his recent meeting with Secretary of Transportation Nominee Anthony Foxx about "Kentucky priorities", and both the Brent Spence Bridge and the I-69 Ohio River Bridge were mentioned as priorities:

Quote
U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell welcomed Secretary of Transportation Nominee Anthony Foxx to his office in the U.S. Capitol.
The meeting provided Senator McConnell the opportunity to highlight the importance of several Kentucky transportation projects, including the Brent Spence Bridge in Northern Kentucky, Ohio River Bridges in Louisville and the I-69 Bridge in Henderson.
“As Republican Leader, I am able to meet face to face with Administration officials to ensure that Kentucky priorities are brought to their attention,” Senator McConnell said. “I appreciate Mayor Foxx taking the time to discuss with me the importance of several Kentucky transportation projects and the challenges to building them during these tough economic times.”

At least Senator McConnell has been successfully lobbied to include the I-69 Ohio River Bridge in the conversation as a "Kentucky priority".
« Last Edit: June 16, 2013, 10:08:18 PM by Grzrd »
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silverback1065

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #138 on: July 22, 2013, 11:41:52 AM »

I didn't see this asked before, so forgive me if it has been, but is there even a map of the proposed routing?  All I've heard is that it will be 3 miles east of US 41.
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #139 on: July 22, 2013, 11:55:50 AM »

is there even a map of the proposed routing?

The project currently has neither a Final Environmental Impact Statement nor a Record of Decision. However, a 2004 Draft Environmental Impact Statement includes a map which is part of this post:

https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=3245.msg186092#msg186092

Kentucky is currently studying possible changes to the corridor in its approach to the bridge:

https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=3245.msg216589#msg216589

This article reports that Gary Valentine, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s new project manager for Interstate 69 .... also spoke about trying to shave costs by shortening the new terrain Henderson approach to the bridge:
Quote
The preferred corridor branches off from the Pennyrile Parkway south of Henderson “what I consider way early,” which will require the construction of about nine miles of new highway at a cost of about $10 million a mile. He said highway officials will look at branching off closer to Henderson.
....
A more recent version of the above-quoted article has Valentine providing more of an explanation of why he would consider altering the route of the Henderson new terrain approach:
Quote
Having two controlled access highways paralleling one another in that stretch doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense, he said, so highway officials will be looking at branching off closer to Henderson.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2013, 10:37:44 PM by Grzrd »
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #140 on: July 27, 2013, 06:08:05 PM »

Quote
“Without it, Evansville simply becomes a cul-de-sac for southbound traffic,” Winnecke said.
:clap:
Great line from Evansville's mayor.

Mayor Winnecke's counterpart across the river has also recently spoken about the bridge. On July 25, Henderson Mayor Steve Austin gave his "State of the City" address.  In this article, he describes the bridge as "the top priority for the city of Henderson":

Quote
Getting a $1.4 billion bridge that will connect I-69 between Kentucky and Indiana is the top priority for the city of Henderson, Mayor Steve Austin told a crowd gathered at the Henderson Fine Arts Center on Thursday.

In another article about Mayor Austin's address, he claims that, "We’re going to get this done one way or another":

Quote
Austin wound up his speech by talking about the proposed bridge for Interstate 69, which is estimated to cost $1.4 billion, but will link major highway improvements on both sides of the river that are already well under way.
“The bridge is a tremendous opportunity but it’s also very difficult,” he said. “It’s very expensive to build. We’ve got to find that money. We’re going to get this done one way or another. We’re going to look at everything.”
« Last Edit: July 27, 2013, 06:22:56 PM by Grzrd »
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silverback1065

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #141 on: July 27, 2013, 08:36:37 PM »

well it's not completely a cul-de-sac, since us41 has its own bridge
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Pete from Boston

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #142 on: July 28, 2013, 02:50:11 AM »

Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke had a good line at the May meeting, saying that without a bridge Interstate 69 becomes “a cul-de-sac” in our area.
A cul-de-sac can be a nice place to have your house, quieter, less traffic. It’s not so good a place to put your business.

It's good for Evansville and 69 boosters to have Winnecke staying vocal about it.  Evansville is of the size that business boosters have plenty to work with but have to keep working with it all the time.

I'm curious about the anticipated effects on the KY side, with 69 potentially drawing off a lot of the (tax-generating) business traffic from 41.  I don't know the ROWs being considered, but 41 traffic may not alone keep it all open.  Maybe for their sake, this leg of 41 should be Business 69, if they do that anymore.

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thefro

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #143 on: July 28, 2013, 08:43:10 AM »

Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke had a good line at the May meeting, saying that without a bridge Interstate 69 becomes “a cul-de-sac” in our area.
A cul-de-sac can be a nice place to have your house, quieter, less traffic. It’s not so good a place to put your business.

It's good for Evansville and 69 boosters to have Winnecke staying vocal about it.  Evansville is of the size that business boosters have plenty to work with but have to keep working with it all the time.

I'm curious about the anticipated effects on the KY side, with 69 potentially drawing off a lot of the (tax-generating) business traffic from 41.  I don't know the ROWs being considered, but 41 traffic may not alone keep it all open.  Maybe for their sake, this leg of 41 should be Business 69, if they do that anymore.

Considering it's highly likely that tolls will be part of the funding mechanism for the I-69 bridge, I would guess that there would still be a ton of traffic on US 41.
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #144 on: July 28, 2013, 08:35:07 PM »

Does anyone know if the proposed bridge will go over the green river also or is the bridge to the I west of the confluence.
The Executive Summary of the 2004 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for I-69 between Evansville and Henderson identifies Alternative 2 as the Preferred Alternative (page 23/23 of pdf; page S-23 of document) and describes Alternative 2's Indiana approach as follows (page 11/23 of pdf):
Quote
Alternative 2 utilizes the existing I-164 alignment from its northern terminus at I-64 in Warrick County, to just east of the Green River Road interchange and west of Angel Mounds State Memorial Site. From that location, the alternative leaves the existing I-164 alignment and heads south to cross the Ohio River immediately west of the mouth of the Green River.
(above quote from I-69 in KY thread)
I'm curious about the anticipated effects on the KY side, with 69 potentially drawing off a lot of the (tax-generating) business traffic from 41.

This article reports on how the anticipated location of the I-69 Ohio River Bridge ("probably somewhere near the mouth of the Green River"), and the anticipated new terrain approach to the bridge will probably make Second Street (KY 351) "the logical front door when I-69 happens" (essentially replacing the US 41 North strip); as a result, Henderson already has efforts underway to improve the Second Street (KY 351) corridor:

Quote
Antique-style lamp posts will go marching up Second Street later this fiscal year as the city embarks on making it the community’s new front door.
And a proposed revamping of the city zoning ordinance will aid in that effort as city officials hope to encourage new investment and development along the corridor.
The long-term vision, of course, is that at some point the Interstate 69 bridge will become a reality — probably somewhere near the mouth of the Green River. City officials think the new bridge approaches will prevent U.S. 41-North from continuing as the city’s main entrance.
“I think eventually that Second Street will become our new I-69 entrance,” said Mayor Steve Austin.
“If that is the case, then we would like for our entrance to our community to be as attractive as possible.”
“It will be the logical front door when I-69 happens,” said City Manager Russell Sights, noting most visitors’ first look at the community is probably the U.S. 41-North strip — not exactly the city’s most attractive aspect.
“With some proper signage we could encourage (motorists) to use Second Street as the main entrance, which is a five-lane highway direct shot to the downtown,” one of Henderson’s best attributes.
The city has drawn up a $688,000 multi-year plan for improving the corridor. In the current fiscal year 22 lamp posts will be placed between the overpass and Alvasia Street at a cost of $176,000. Another $64,000 will pay for sidewalk, curb and gutter repair and replacement in the same area.
Next fiscal year another 20 lamps will sprout up between Alvasia and Adams streets at a cost of $160,000, while another $64,000 is slated for sidewalk and other concrete repairs there. The final phase, in fiscal year 2015-16, will see the final 20 lamp posts and concrete repairs at the same costs between Adams and Green streets ....
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 09:59:59 AM by Grzrd »
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Captain Jack

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #145 on: July 30, 2013, 12:34:09 AM »

Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke had a good line at the May meeting, saying that without a bridge Interstate 69 becomes “a cul-de-sac” in our area.
A cul-de-sac can be a nice place to have your house, quieter, less traffic. It’s not so good a place to put your business.

It's good for Evansville and 69 boosters to have Winnecke staying vocal about it.  Evansville is of the size that business boosters have plenty to work with but have to keep working with it all the time.

I'm curious about the anticipated effects on the KY side, with 69 potentially drawing off a lot of the (tax-generating) business traffic from 41.  I don't know the ROWs being considered, but 41 traffic may not alone keep it all open.  Maybe for their sake, this leg of 41 should be Business 69, if they do that anymore.

Considering the proximity of US 41 to both the central business district of Evansville and Henderson proper, I would imagine US 41 would still be the primary route for local traffic between Henderson and most of Evansville. As others have mentioned, apparently quite a few people still use US 41 through Evansville instead of using I-164.  I can't imagine why, but if that is the case, I would assume that would continue as well for US 41 through traffic.

My guess with these traffic patterns, the US 41 bridges would still have a heavier traffic count than the new I-69 bridges.
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Grzrd

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #146 on: October 08, 2013, 09:13:06 PM »

This article reports that the Southwest Indiana Chamber of Commerce has hired the former president and CEO of the Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce, Christy Gillenwater, to be its president and CEO.
In a Letter From the Chamber President, Gillenwater .... intends to cooperate in identifying a funding mechanism for the I-69 Ohio River bridge
Some Democrats and Republicans appear to be cooperating in an effort to bring home some federal I-69 funding, presumably in the hope that I-69 will have a prominent role in the 2015 national freight plan*:
http://www.texasgopvote.com/issues/grow-economy/us-congressman-blake-farenthold-launches-bipartisan-interstate-69-congressional-005905
* with up to 95% federal funding for interstate projects:
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Prioritization of projects to improve freight movement
Authorizes DOT to allow a maximum Federal share of 95% for an Interstate System project (or of 90% for a non-Interstate System project) if the project makes a demonstrable improvement in the efficiency of freight movement and is identified in a State freight plan (as described in section 1118 of MAP-21). [§1116]
MAP-21 national freight plan was discussed at the recent Intermodal Freight Conference in Memphis:
http://www.memphisdailynews.com/news/2013/sep/26/economist-outlines-us-freight-network-at-intermodal-conference/#comments
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an appearance from U.S. Department of Transportation chief economist Jack Wells ... spoke to the group about ... development of a national freight strategic plan by 2015.
“We are going to implement this as a multimodal plan,” Wells said. “MAP-21 defines a national freight network as a highway-only network, but we think it is important to have a multimodal approach to freight planning, whether it is at the state or national level.”.
(bottom quote from Bipartisan I-69 Congressional Caucus Launched thread)

In another Letter from the Chamber President, Gillenwater illustrates that she has picked up the "multimodal" message loud and clear by referencing it in regard to the I-69 Ohio River Bridge and the completion of I-69 to Indianapolis:

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Our mission and vision directed us to focus on several strategic goals ... Another key focus will be to improve multimodal regional transportation infrastructure — with the completion of an interstate-grade I-69 bridge and seamless connection between Indianapolis and Evansville via Interstate 69.

Is there a need for another rail crossing in the Evansville-Henderson area that could be incorporated into the I-69 bridge in order to possibly strengthen a bid for some federal "mutimodal" freight funding (if any federal funding will be available at all in 2015)?
« Last Edit: October 08, 2013, 09:23:31 PM by Grzrd »
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thefro

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #147 on: October 09, 2013, 09:10:49 AM »

The issue is I don't even see a rail line anywhere close to where the proposed new I-69 bridge is going to go.

The existing CSX line seems to run on the other side of Evansville, on the W side of US 41, then goes under the Lloyd Expressway (SR 62), goes through the industrial district in Evansville, then basically follows the river on the Indiana side all the way down to Henderson and then crosses going east-southeast into downtown Henderson.

So you're either looking at miles of new railroad, some of which would have to run through downtown Evansville, or running I-69 through Evansville to meet up with the railroad track.
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NE2

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Re: I-69 Ohio River Bridge
« Reply #148 on: October 09, 2013, 10:16:30 AM »

There used to be a railroad car ferry across the river near the US 41 bridge. In its last days it was abandoned by the Illinois Central and leased by an electric interurban.
http://www.hendersonkyhistory.com/Interurban.htm
http://books.google.com/books?id=_ufnPiYmy48C&pg=PA124
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pre-1945 Florida route log

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I-69 Ohio River Bridge To Be Completed in Eight Years?
« Reply #149 on: October 14, 2013, 04:44:40 PM »

Reading the above tea leaves in this thread, and the Indiana and Kentucky threads, I think the current thinking may be to have significant progress on the I-69 Ohio River Bridge in the 2018-2020 time frame.
Henderson Mayor Steve Austin gave his "State of the City" address .... In another article about Mayor Austin's address, ...:
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Austin wound up his speech by talking about the proposed bridge for Interstate 69 ...“The bridge is a tremendous opportunity but it’s also very difficult,” he said. “It’s very expensive to build. We’ve got to find that money. We’re going to get this done one way or another. We’re going to look at everything.”
Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke had a good line at the May meeting, saying that without a bridge Interstate 69 becomes “a cul-de-sac” in our area.
A cul-de-sac can be a nice place to have your house, quieter, less traffic. It’s not so good a place to put your business.
It's good for Evansville and 69 boosters to have Winnecke staying vocal about it.  Evansville is of the size that business boosters have plenty to work with but have to keep working with it all the time.

This article reports that Winnecke and Brad Schneider, president of the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, have committed to keep working with it by announcing both the creation of BridgeLink, a Henderson-Evansville partnership to campaign for the bridge, and a self-imposed eight-year timeline to complete the I-69 Ohio River bridge project:

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Proponents of building an Interstate 69 bridge across the river between Henderson and Evansville said Monday they want to see the span completed within eight years.
“That’s our objective,” Evansville Mayor Lloyd Winnecke said
at a news conference announcing the creation of BridgeLink, a Henderson-Evansville partnership to campaign for the bridge.
“It’s an aggressive timeline,” Winnecke acknowledged. “We feel if we don’t have an aggressive timeline, it delays the project.”
Organizers intend to lobby in the state capitals of Frankfort and Indianapolis as well as in Washington, D.C. But they also want to change local perceptions.
“We have had citizens thinking it won’t happen in their lifetime,” Brad Schneider, president of the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, told reporters.
“We have to talk about it being inevitable, not impossible,” Schneider said ....
“BridgeLink” — getting an I-69 bridge constructed here — “will happen,” the Evansville mayor declared. “It will happen in the next five to eight years,” assuming three years of lobbying and preconstruction environmental and design work, followed by a five-year construction timetable.

Austin also spoke at the BridgeLink announcement ceremony:

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“But I-69 will not be complete and will not bring economic growth to our area until the supporting bridge is built across the river here,” Henderson Mayor Steve Austin declared ... As you know, those structures are getting older,” Austin said. “One is almost 50 years old and the other is (80) years old.”

At least they have set a goal.

edit

The article includes a photograph from the announcement ceremony.  Of interest from the photo is an I-69 shield that has a red bridge at the top of the shield:

« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 10:22:28 PM by Grzrd »
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