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National Boards => General Highway Talk => Topic started by: 1 on January 06, 2021, 09:29:58 AM

Title: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1 on January 06, 2021, 09:29:58 AM
MA: My choice would be CT 20. It's an airport connector for an airport that serves the Springfield area.
NH: I would actually choose I-495 (MA) over I-91, as the I-495 area is much more populated.
ME: NB 2. (NH 16 enters ME.)
RI: I-395, maybe? It's in the less populated part of the state, but there aren't really any good choices in the Providence area.
CT: Complete guess, but NY 22. (People going to Six Flags from Connecticut will be using CT/MA 159, not MA 57.)
VT: A-35 until it gets completed to I-89. Once it does, still A-35 if it's considered a separate route, or NY 22 if A-35/I-89 and A-55/I-91 are each one route.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: NWI_Irish96 on January 06, 2021, 09:37:06 AM
This is a weird question, but for Indiana I'd have to say I-294.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Max Rockatansky on January 06, 2021, 09:41:32 AM
I-19 for California given a lot of people and freight cross the border there to Sonora.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: EpicRoadways on January 06, 2021, 09:43:40 AM
For Minnesota, maybe WI-35? A decent number of people from River Falls and Hudson commute to the east metro so that would be my nomination. Otherwise you could maybe make a case for I-29 since it runs so close to the border although I don't think the majority of that traffic is Minnesota-bound, even in the Fargo and Grand Forks areas.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Crown Victoria on January 06, 2021, 09:49:31 AM
For PA, the New Jersey Turnpike mainline. It is the main route for traffic from NYC and New England to travel south and links to the only roadway that bypasses PA entirely (Delaware Memorial Bridge).

*The NJ Turnpike counts despite also carrying I-95 (which enters PA) because only part of the Turnpike is I-95. If one wishes we can consider the unsigned NJ 700 portion of the Turnpike as the "most important route".
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: CNGL-Leudimin on January 06, 2021, 10:24:05 AM
One that is outside an entire country, but still is important for it: Swiss A13 for Liechtenstein.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Flint1979 on January 06, 2021, 10:29:35 AM
For Michigan I'll say probably US-20 or I-80/90.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 06, 2021, 10:38:05 AM
I'll go with I-65 for Ohio. Until I-69 is finished in KY and TN, which then the WK Parkway/I-71 can serve as a spur of I-69 into Ohio, I-65 is part of the fastest route from at least Cincinnati, Columbus and Cleveland via I-71 to cities in the south like Houston (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/US 59), Dallas (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30), Austin/San Antonio (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/I-35) and New Orleans (I-71/I-65/I-59) and points beyond like Mexico or closer points like Memphis or Nashville. I-65 is also part of the fastest route from Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus to Chicago and Milwaukee, and part of one of 2 options (along with I-74/I-39) to Madison and the Twin Cities.

Conversely, I think it might be I-75 for Indiana

For Missouri, this one is easy: I-24. Primary connector from most of the state, including St. Louis and Kansas City to the southeast.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: jp the roadgeek on January 06, 2021, 10:49:54 AM
MA: My choice would be CT 20. It's an airport connector for an airport that serves the Springfield area.
NH: I would actually choose I-495 (MA) over I-91, as the I-495 area is much more populated.
ME: NB 2. (NH 16 enters ME.)
RI: I-395, maybe? It's in the less populated part of the state, but there aren't really any good choices in the Providence area.
CT: Complete guess, but NY 22. (People going to Six Flags from Connecticut will be using CT/MA 159, not MA 57.)
VT: A-35 until it gets completed to I-89. Once it does, still A-35 if it's considered a separate route, or NY 22 if A-35/I-89 and A-55/I-91 are each one route.

A couple others I'd consider

VT: MA 2 or I-87.  Many Bostonians would use MA 2 to get to area in southern VT.  Many New Yorkers use the Northway as long as possible before jumping east into VT because of a lack of major interstate south and west of Burlington.

RI: I-495.  A lot of traffic from the eastern part of the Worcester area and the outer parts of MetroWest will use it to get to the Providence area instead of MA/RI 146 or I-95.

CT: I'd have to say I-90.  It's a major part of the route from either Boston or Albany.  Every major numbered route coming from NYC enters the state. 
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: thspfc on January 06, 2021, 10:50:17 AM
Cool thread idea. I'd say I-80 for Wisconsin. You could also argue for IL I-290/294.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Henry on January 06, 2021, 10:57:19 AM
For WA, I'd say I-84, since that's a major part of a Salt Lake-Seattle route.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1995hoo on January 06, 2021, 10:58:16 AM
Virginia is tough. Given the layout of state lines, most of the significant routes in neighboring states or jurisdictions either pass through Virginia (US-50, I-64, I-95, I-81), don't come close enough to be a serious contender (see below about I-40), or just plain don't seem important enough in the big picture (I-83, North Carolina's I-73 and I-74). I-79 might fall into both of the latter categories.

For that reason, I'm inclined to say I-70. It passes within about 13 miles of Virginia (via US-340 and US-15) in the Frederick area—probably a bit less as the crow flies, but I don't have a good way to measure that—and it's the major route west for a lot of traffic because of people's bias against using non-Interstate routes.

I thought about I-40, but I don't think it passes close enough to Virginia to be a serious contender unless maybe you were to argue that it should have been routed northeast from Raleigh to Norfolk instead of southeast to Wilmington. I'd suggest the latter is more in the nature of "Fictional Highways" because for purposes of this thread, I figure we should take the highways as they are instead of saying "what if." That is, it's one thing if a route extension is planned, like the Autoroute 35 example in the original post, but it seems to me that if a totally different highway is planned in the future, that's a different matter that, for purposes of this thread, doesn't seem to justify saying (in this example) "I-40 should have gone there in the first place."
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: corco on January 06, 2021, 11:09:33 AM
Idaho is probably US 395 - since it forms part of the I-84/I-82/US 395/I-90 detour that is typically the fastest way from Boise to Coeur d'Alene in the winter.

I'm pretty sure Montana straight up doesn't have one - unless you count Alberta 4 (which turns into I-15).

Colorado is almost certainly I-80.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: jmacswimmer on January 06, 2021, 11:16:49 AM
A couple options I can think of for Maryland:

-Delaware's iterations of I-295 (and by extension, the NJTP) & I-495, as they divide up the NYC/Philly traffic coming up the I-95 corridor from DC/Baltimore.

-I-76/PATP, as long-haul traffic heading west from DC/Baltimore toward Pittsburgh/Cleveland/Chicago enters the Turnpike at Breezewood.  This one ties in nicely with 1995hoo's comment on I-70 being the one for Virginia.  (On a more local level, I'd also include I-270 for Virginia, given how much traffic goes over the Legion Bridge on the beltway and then continues up I-270.)
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SP Cook on January 06, 2021, 11:28:04 AM
WV is easy.  I-95.  The majority of what the government calls "tourists" are through tourists, and 90-79-L-77-26-95 is the direct drive from Toronto-Buffalo-Pittsburgh to Florida, and 77-26-95 is an even choice for Florida bound Clevelanders. 

Most of the trucking is likewise stuff coming out of the Midwest and heading to the coast. 

I-95.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: The Nature Boy on January 06, 2021, 11:28:14 AM
MA: My choice would be CT 20. It's an airport connector for an airport that serves the Springfield area.
NH: I would actually choose I-495 (MA) over I-91, as the I-495 area is much more populated.
ME: NB 2. (NH 16 enters ME.)
RI: I-395, maybe? It's in the less populated part of the state, but there aren't really any good choices in the Providence area.
CT: Complete guess, but NY 22. (People going to Six Flags from Connecticut will be using CT/MA 159, not MA 57.)
VT: A-35 until it gets completed to I-89. Once it does, still A-35 if it's considered a separate route, or NY 22 if A-35/I-89 and A-55/I-91 are each one route.

I would disagree on I-495 for NH. In terms of importance to intrastate travel and commerce, I-91 trumps it. I-91 is a legitimate connector for NH towns in the Connecticut River Valley. A person traveling from Lebanon to Keene would take I-91 for most of the trip. Going north-south in that region of the state basically requires you to use I-91, which is fairly unique. It's a Vermont interstate that is the primary connection for an entire region of New Hampshire but yet never actually crosses into the state.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 06, 2021, 11:33:17 AM
For that reason, I'm inclined to say I-70. It passes within about 13 miles of Virginia (via US-340 and US-15) in the Frederick area—probably a bit less as the crow flies, but I don't have a good way to measure that—and it's the major route west for a lot of traffic because of people's bias against using non-Interstate routes.
Specifically for the DC/NoVA area, I-70 is pretty much the one choice. It's the main route going west of the area, even over I-66. Even for cities on I-64, like Louisville, to DC, the fastest route (I-64/I-79/I-68/I-70/I-270/I-495) uses I-70 into the area instead of I-66. I-70 also connects that area to cities on I-80/90 in the midwest like Chicago and Cleveland via I-76. It's not until cities on the I-40 corridor where I-66 becomes the clear winner over I-70 for route west of DC.

Could also mention I-270 for the US 15 connection in addition to I-70, which connects DC/NoVA to Upstate NY and Ontario.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: hbelkins on January 06, 2021, 11:49:35 AM
Three choices I can think of for Kentucky: US 58, I-79, or I-81.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1995hoo on January 06, 2021, 11:52:22 AM
For that reason, I'm inclined to say I-70. It passes within about 13 miles of Virginia (via US-340 and US-15) in the Frederick area—probably a bit less as the crow flies, but I don't have a good way to measure that—and it's the major route west for a lot of traffic because of people's bias against using non-Interstate routes.
Specifically for the DC/NoVA area, I-70 is pretty much the one choice. It's the main route going west of the area, even over I-66. Even for cities on I-64, like Louisville, to DC, the fastest route (I-64/I-79/I-68/I-70/I-270/I-495) uses I-70 into the area instead of I-66. I-70 also connects that area to cities on I-80/90 in the midwest like Chicago and Cleveland via I-76. It's not until cities on the I-40 corridor where I-66 becomes the clear winner over I-70 for route west of DC.

Could also mention I-270 for the US 15 connection in addition to I-70, which connects DC/NoVA to Upstate NY and Ontario.

Heh, my wife was quite surprised and puzzled in October when I exited the Beltway onto westbound I-66 en route to Dayton. I intended to (and did) take Corridor H. She was thinking in terms of the Interstate route she had always taken (recognizing, to be fair, that for most of those years Corridor H either didn't exist or wasn't completed enough to be viable).

I thought about I-270, but I thought it kind of felt a lot like it's a continuous route with the Beltway in some respects. Of course it isn't really, but with the way the roads are configured, the Beltway to I-270 up to Frederick is a fairly natural route to take, and it's really at that point when you have to decide what to do (leave the Interstate for US-15 north, take I-70 to continue west, possibly take US-340 towards West Virginia).

Also, to be clear, while I-70 is not a road people from Richmond or Hampton Roads or Southwest Virginia would be using, I couldn't come up with any route of comparable significance in another state that would apply to those areas. That is, from Richmond if you were headed to Louisville (or Dayton, to use my example above) you'd likely take I-64 (and then US-35 in the Dayton example), but I-64 obviously enters Virginia. For Southwest Virginia, while I-26 crossed my mind, it just didn't seem as important on a national scale as I-70.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 06, 2021, 12:02:57 PM
For that reason, I'm inclined to say I-70. It passes within about 13 miles of Virginia (via US-340 and US-15) in the Frederick area—probably a bit less as the crow flies, but I don't have a good way to measure that—and it's the major route west for a lot of traffic because of people's bias against using non-Interstate routes.
Specifically for the DC/NoVA area, I-70 is pretty much the one choice. It's the main route going west of the area, even over I-66. Even for cities on I-64, like Louisville, to DC, the fastest route (I-64/I-79/I-68/I-70/I-270/I-495) uses I-70 into the area instead of I-66. I-70 also connects that area to cities on I-80/90 in the midwest like Chicago and Cleveland via I-76. It's not until cities on the I-40 corridor where I-66 becomes the clear winner over I-70 for route west of DC.

Could also mention I-270 for the US 15 connection in addition to I-70, which connects DC/NoVA to Upstate NY and Ontario.
I thought about I-270, but I thought it kind of felt a lot like it's a continuous route with the Beltway in some respects. Of course it isn't really, but with the way the roads are configured, the Beltway to I-270 up to Frederick is a fairly natural route to take, and it's really at that point when you have to decide what to do (leave the Interstate for US-15 north, take I-70 to continue west, possibly take US-340 towards West Virginia).
I also skipped out I-270 when going through this the first time because in my mindset, it's still I-70S, one of the very few removed suffixed interstates that makes sense to me, along with I-70N to Baltimore, because it's one of two branches serving the 2 principal cities of the combined DC-Baltimore metro area, similar to I-35 E/W for Dallas-Ft Worth and Minneapolis-St. Paul. Then there's the debate of how suffixed interstates should be counted, and for me, I count all 3 under I-70.

And then I realized that I-70S has been I-270 for the past 45 years :pan:
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Ben114 on January 06, 2021, 12:03:29 PM
CT: I'd have to say I-90.  It's a major part of the route from either Boston or Albany.  Every major numbered route coming from NYC enters the state.
Either this or I-87 for CT.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: US 89 on January 06, 2021, 12:07:42 PM
I don't think Utah really has one, since most long-distance corridors you'd take to get places from Utah pass through it. Maybe US 30 or 93, but really those are more useful for people in the small towns along them to get to Salt Lake rather than the other way around. Plus 30 isn't really that important of a route since it largely follows I-80 and I-84.

US 550 might be another option, since that's a big part of going SE from Salt Lake to really anywhere in the US south of I-40 and west of I-65.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1995hoo on January 06, 2021, 12:21:23 PM
I don't think Utah really has one, since most long-distance corridors you'd take to get places from Utah pass through it. Maybe US 30 or 93, but really those are more useful for people in the small towns along them to get to Salt Lake rather than the other way around. Plus 30 isn't really that important of a route since it largely follows I-80 and I-84.

US 550 might be another option, since that's a big part of going SE from Salt Lake to really anywhere in the US south of I-40 and west of I-65.

Maybe US-64? I recognize the part of Utah near there is relatively isolated from the rest of the state, of course.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: vdeane on January 06, 2021, 12:46:23 PM
For NY, I-80 and the QEW.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: TXtoNJ on January 06, 2021, 01:05:44 PM
For Texas, oddly enough, I'd say I-81. It's the only route that connects to all parts of the Triangle equally, far away as it is.

I-59 is more important for the southern parts of the Triangle, but Metroplex traffic has almost no reason to use it.

On second thought, I suppose I-12 is important for all parts of Texas going to the Florida Panhandle beaches, depending on whether Metroplex traffic uses I-49 to cut down, or cuts through Hattiesburg instead.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: GaryV on January 06, 2021, 01:12:20 PM
For Michigan I'll say probably US-20 or I-80/90.
Ontario 401 or 402.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: gonealookin on January 06, 2021, 01:46:55 PM
Northern Nevada:  I-5.  The majority of traffic from the west passes through Sacramento.  A lot of it comes straight up I-80 from the Bay Area, but much of the rest would be on I-5 at some point.

Southern Nevada:  I-70.  Quite a bit of that traffic is ultimately bound for Las Vegas.  An argument could be made for I-40 as well.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: CoreySamson on January 06, 2021, 02:32:44 PM
I agree with the I-12 sentiment for Texas. Although I do feel like I-25 is important for connecting Texas to the Pacific Northwest.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: US 89 on January 06, 2021, 04:25:33 PM
I agree with the I-12 sentiment for Texas. Although I do feel like I-25 is important for connecting Texas to the Pacific Northwest.

Not really. I would imagine most people going from Texas to the PacNW would only use I-25 for a short distance in the Albuquerque area between I-40 and US 550.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 06, 2021, 04:30:23 PM
For Texas, oddly enough, I'd say I-81. It's the only route that connects to all parts of the Triangle equally, far away as it is.

I-59 is more important for the southern parts of the Triangle, but Metroplex traffic has almost no reason to use it.

On second thought, I suppose I-12 is important for all parts of Texas going to the Florida Panhandle beaches, depending on whether Metroplex traffic uses I-49 to cut down, or cuts through Hattiesburg instead.

Maybe a lesser would be I-25, with it having a defacto south control city of El Paso.

I-12's mirror to the west, without joining back to I-10 is I-8, keeping the San Diego to Dallas/Ft. Worth/San Antonio corridor open. 

Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 06, 2021, 04:51:29 PM
For Texas, oddly enough, I'd say I-81. It's the only route that connects to all parts of the Triangle equally, far away as it is.

I-59 is more important for the southern parts of the Triangle, but Metroplex traffic has almost no reason to use it.

On second thought, I suppose I-12 is important for all parts of Texas going to the Florida Panhandle beaches, depending on whether Metroplex traffic uses I-49 to cut down, or cuts through Hattiesburg instead.

Maybe a lesser would be I-25, with it having a defacto south control city of El Paso.

I-12's mirror to the west, without joining back to I-10 is I-8, keeping the San Diego to Dallas/Ft. Worth/San Antonio corridor open. 


I agree with the I-12 sentiment for Texas. Although I do feel like I-25 is important for connecting Texas to the Pacific Northwest.
I had I-65 as my example for Ohio to Texas. The inverse can work too, as I-65, combined with I-71 provides access from Texas to Ohio, Western PA and Western NY. It's also one of the options to NYC (via I-70/78) and Boston (via I-90) along with the I-81 routing.
I'll go with I-65 for Ohio. Until I-69 is finished in KY and TN, which then the WK Parkway/I-71 can serve as a spur of I-69 into Ohio, I-65 is part of the fastest route from at least Cincy, Columbus and Cleveland via I-71 to cities in the south like Houston (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/US 59), Dallas (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30), Austin/San Antonio (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/I-35) and New Orleans (I-71/I-65/I-59) and points beyond like Mexico or closer points like Memphis or Nashville.
I-57 is another honorable mention for Texas. The following cities has I-57 as part of its fastest route from the Texas Triangle: Chicago, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Detroit, Toronto. This is even more evident when I-57 gets extended south to Little Rock.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 06, 2021, 05:19:25 PM
For Texas, oddly enough, I'd say I-81. It's the only route that connects to all parts of the Triangle equally, far away as it is.

I-59 is more important for the southern parts of the Triangle, but Metroplex traffic has almost no reason to use it.

On second thought, I suppose I-12 is important for all parts of Texas going to the Florida Panhandle beaches, depending on whether Metroplex traffic uses I-49 to cut down, or cuts through Hattiesburg instead.

Maybe a lesser would be I-25, with it having a defacto south control city of El Paso.

I-12's mirror to the west, without joining back to I-10 is I-8, keeping the San Diego to Dallas/Ft. Worth/San Antonio corridor open. 


I agree with the I-12 sentiment for Texas. Although I do feel like I-25 is important for connecting Texas to the Pacific Northwest.
I had I-65 as my example for Ohio to Texas. The inverse can work too, as I-65, combined with I-71 provides access from Texas to Ohio, Western PA and Western NY. It's also one of the options to NYC (via I-70/78) and Boston (via I-90) along with the I-81 routing.
I'll go with I-65 for Ohio. Until I-69 is finished in KY and TN, which then the WK Parkway/I-71 can serve as a spur of I-69 into Ohio, I-65 is part of the fastest route from at least Cincy, Columbus and Cleveland via I-71 to cities in the south like Houston (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/US 59), Dallas (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30), Austin/San Antonio (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/I-35) and New Orleans (I-71/I-65/I-59) and points beyond like Mexico or closer points like Memphis or Nashville.
I-57 is another honorable mention for Texas. The following cities has I-57 as part of its fastest route from the Texas Triangle: Chicago, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Detroit, Toronto. This is even more evident when I-57 gets extended south to Little Rock.

It is funny that I want to say I-40, as in taking traffic from Raleigh-Durham, Winston Salem, Knoxville, Nashville, Memphis and Little Rock to I-30 then heading to Dallas/Ft. Worth.  I want to say it, then remember I-40 runs through the panhandle.  From Little Rock running east, its true, and hard to keep in mind that westbound I-40 from Little Rock still has a lot of Arkansas to go through, then the width of Oklahoma before it sniffs Texas.  The Texas it enters isn't the same world as the Texas the I-30 corridor serves. 
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: odditude on January 06, 2021, 05:24:27 PM
for NJ, it would likely be either I-476 or I-87.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: pianocello on January 06, 2021, 05:49:55 PM
For Iowa: I-88. Drops you right into downtown Chicago, plus almost any other regionally significant roads that Iowans use would just go through the state.

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 06, 2021, 06:00:38 PM
For Iowa: I-88. Drops you right into downtown Chicago, plus almost any other regionally significant roads that Iowans use would just go through the state.

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.
Here's my options for FL:
I-24: Part of fastest route from FL to most points northwest of the state, notably cities in the Midwest west of Ohio like Indianapolis, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Minneapolis, and even a far flung city like Seattle (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Seattle,+WA/Miami,+FL/@39.9796291,-109.1798675,4.73z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x5490102c93e83355:0x102565466944d59a!2m2!1d-122.3320708!2d47.6062095!1m5!1m1!1s0x88d9b0a20ec8c111:0xff96f271ddad4f65!2m2!1d-80.1917902!2d25.7616798!3e0)
I-77: Part of fastest route from FL to cities like Charlotte, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Toronto
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: oscar on January 06, 2021, 06:06:59 PM
For Alaska, has to be Yukon 1 (part of the Alaska Highway). Key link between most of Alaska to its southeastern panhandle (via YT 2 to Skagway, and YT 3 to Haines), as well as to the lower 48.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 06, 2021, 06:11:09 PM
I-37 and I-45 for Oklahoma.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Brandon on January 06, 2021, 07:16:53 PM
This is a weird question, but for Indiana I'd have to say I-294.

And on the flip side, I'd say I-65 for Illinois.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: I-55 on January 06, 2021, 07:40:53 PM
MS: Not many options, but comes down to either I-40 or I-459. (For Desoto County/Northern MS and for bypassing Birmingham on I-20 or I-59).
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: KCRoadFan on January 06, 2021, 08:09:52 PM
As for Missouri, I think it would be I-24. By connecting to I-57 in southern Illinois near Carbondale (in turn leading to I-64 at Mt. Vernon), it serves as an important route from the South into St. Louis - which, in turn, has connections to many points throughout the state.

(I would also have included I-57 itself for southern Missouri, but because it actually does enter the state, it doesn’t count. I-57 would work for Arkansas, though.)

Also, here’s another example: I-29 for Nebraska, because it connects to Omaha via I-80 at Council Bluffs - not to mention all of the other bridges into Nebraska from Iowa, thanks to its running parallel to the Missouri River along the western edge of the latter state. (In a similar vein, because it runs along the eastern edge of both the Dakotas, I-29 also serves as a connector for various points in western Minnesota.)
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: skluth on January 06, 2021, 08:55:36 PM
Interesting topic. I'm doing all the states where I lived.

Wisconsin: I-294/Tri-State Tollway. The most popular route for Badger State residents to get to Chicago and points south and east, despite the universal hatred of Illinois Tollways throughout the state. It's also the primary route for FIBs to get to Door County.

Missouri: It used to be I-64 which terminated in East St Louis. It now runs through St Louis to Wentzville, so I can't say that. I agree with the others that it's now I-24, although KS 10 is probably more important for Kansas City.

Virginia: I'd say NC 168 which takes drivers out of Tidewater to the Outer Banks. But I agree with the poster who stated it's difficult to come up with one for VA.

California: I've only lived here a couple years now, so I'm sure others have better ideas. I can only think of the highway that runs to the San Ysidro border crossing because it's the busiest land border crossing in the Western Hemisphere.

I never lived in Arkansas, but I'm going to say it's I-69 because they're obsessed with it coming to their state.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: epzik8 on January 06, 2021, 09:24:35 PM
For that reason, I'm inclined to say I-70. It passes within about 13 miles of Virginia (via US-340 and US-15) in the Frederick area—probably a bit less as the crow flies, but I don't have a good way to measure that—and it's the major route west for a lot of traffic because of people's bias against using non-Interstate routes.
Specifically for the DC/NoVA area, I-70 is pretty much the one choice. It's the main route going west of the area, even over I-66. Even for cities on I-64, like Louisville, to DC, the fastest route (I-64/I-79/I-68/I-70/I-270/I-495) uses I-70 into the area instead of I-66. I-70 also connects that area to cities on I-80/90 in the midwest like Chicago and Cleveland via I-76. It's not until cities on the I-40 corridor where I-66 becomes the clear winner over I-70 for route west of DC.

Could also mention I-270 for the US 15 connection in addition to I-70, which connects DC/NoVA to Upstate NY and Ontario.
Similarly, for Maryland I would nominate I-66, since people coming from Montgomery County or from Baltimore can follow I-495 into Northern Virginia and pick up I-66 to go west toward the mountains. Coming from Prince George's County, Annapolis or the Eastern Shore you could go either way on 495, but I would choose to take the inner loop of I-495 from US 50, cross the Wilson Bridge into Virginia and make my way up to 66 that way. Alternatively, you could sit through endless traffic lights in DC.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ilpt4u on January 06, 2021, 10:37:32 PM
This is a weird question, but for Indiana I'd have to say I-294.

And on the flip side, I'd say I-65 for Illinois.
I was going to say I-44 for Illinois, but I-65 probably tops it
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: jp the roadgeek on January 06, 2021, 11:03:25 PM
MS: Not many options, but comes down to either I-40 or I-459. (For Desoto County/Northern MS and for bypassing Birmingham on I-20 or I-59).

For the southern part, I would say I-12, since it's an important long-distance bypass of New Orleans that can be used for MS bound traffic that will use either I-10 or I-59. 
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ran4sh on January 06, 2021, 11:39:34 PM
For Georgia it's hard to pick one because most routes going toward Georgia enter it. I-10 is an Interstate that barely misses entering Georgia but it's just not important for most of the state. I'll say I-40 because a lot of traffic to Georgia uses part of that Interstate even if only because of an overlap. I-40 overlaps with I-85 in NC, and with both I-75 and I-65 in TN, and is directly used by traffic coming from along the route west of Memphis.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: KCRoadFan on January 07, 2021, 12:59:48 AM
Another example I just thought of: for both Nevada and California, one could arguably say I-70. That road has a southwest trajectory as it meets its western end at I-15 in the Utah desert; thus, I-70 traffic segues nicely onto I-15 south toward Las Vegas and, eventually, the “Inland Empire” area of California (and from there, either continuing south on I-15 to San Diego or west on I-10 to Los Angeles).
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: planxtymcgillicuddy on January 07, 2021, 01:08:10 AM
For North Carolina, I would imagine the answer would either be I-81 or US-58

EDIT: I-20 also comes to mind, with its eastern terminus at I-95. I-79 is another good candidate
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: sparker on January 07, 2021, 01:43:57 AM
For CA, the most important Interstate would be I-70, since it funnels substantial traffic to/from I-15 which, of course, feeds much of SoCal.  At this time I can't think of a current US highway that performs a similar function without actually entering the state.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: jakeroot on January 07, 2021, 02:24:31 AM
For CA, the most important Interstate would be I-70, since it funnels substantial traffic to/from I-15 which, of course, feeds much of SoCal.  At this time I can't think of a current US highway that performs a similar function without actually entering the state.

I was thinking I-70 as well. Max suggested I-19 but I think I-70 is, overall, responsible for more traffic in California.

For WA, I'd say I-84, since that's a major part of a Salt Lake-Seattle route.

100% concur. I-84 is hugely important for WA, whether you use I-5 or I-82 to reach it. US-95 might be a close second.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: RoadWarrior56 on January 07, 2021, 06:34:21 AM
As a Georgia resident, I would normally have to say I-24.  However, since 4 miles of that road is actually inside of Georgia, I-24 does not qualify as a roadway that doesn't enter the state. 

In my opinion, the most important route that does not enter the state would be I-22.  Since its completion, Atlanta now has a direct interstate connection to the I-40/Old US 66 transcontinental corridor via I-20 to Birmingham and I-22 to Memphis.  As I-40 was mentioned already, I would have to agree that it is important as well.  I put I-22 ahead of it because it is located closer to the state and probably handles a lot of Georgia-related traffic.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Bickendan on January 07, 2021, 06:47:44 AM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: DandyDan on January 07, 2021, 08:32:40 AM
For Iowa: I-88. Drops you right into downtown Chicago, plus almost any other regionally significant roads that Iowans use would just go through the state.
I was challenged to think of one til you said that. I suspect if you live or are going to a point close to the Minnesota border, it's I-90.

Also, here’s another example: I-29 for Nebraska, because it connects to Omaha via I-80 at Council Bluffs - not to mention all of the other bridges into Nebraska from Iowa, thanks to its running parallel to the Missouri River along the western edge of the latter state. (In a similar vein, because it runs along the eastern edge of both the Dakotas, I-29 also serves as a connector for various points in western Minnesota.)
If ever there was an obvious answer for a state, that is it for Nebraska. I would go so far as to say I-29 would be it for Kansas as well.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1995hoo on January 07, 2021, 08:44:32 AM
....

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.

I was looking at a map and I wonder whether I-185 might work as Florida's candidate. At first blush it seems odd to suggest a 3di as an "important" route, but looking at a map suggests that if I-185 extended south to I-10 (whether as I-185 or as a route with some other number), it would provide a logical all-Interstate-grade route from both Tallahassee and the Florida Panhandle to Atlanta and other points to the northeast.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: dkblake on January 07, 2021, 09:06:41 AM
VT: I'd go with I-87 over either MA 2 or the Quebec highways. CT depends on which way you're going, but I would go with I-287 then I-90.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: jmacswimmer on January 07, 2021, 09:09:48 AM
....

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.

I was looking at a map and I wonder whether I-185 might work as Florida's candidate. At first blush it seems odd to suggest a 3di as an "important" route, but looking at a map suggests that if I-185 extended south to I-10 (whether as I-185 or as a route with some other number), it would provide a logical all-Interstate-grade route from both Tallahassee and the Florida Panhandle to Atlanta and other points to the northeast.

I'll throw out another candidate: I-77?  I imagine that upon reaching Columbia SC, long-haul traffic on the I-77 corridor cuts over on I-26 and then continues on I-95 to Georgia & Florida. 

(This was apparent on a trip a few weeks ago when, after free-flowing conditions thru Virginia & the Carolinas on I-95, traffic ground to a halt at exit 86 courtesy of the sheer volume entering from I-26 east, and the congestion continued on-and-off all the way over the Savannah River to where the 3rd lane begins in Georgia.)
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1995hoo on January 07, 2021, 09:16:02 AM
....

(This was apparent on a trip a few weeks ago when, after free-flowing conditions thru Virginia & the Carolinas on I-95, traffic ground to a halt at exit 86 courtesy of the sheer volume entering from I-26 east, and the congestion continued on-and-off all the way over the Savannah River to where the 3rd lane begins in Georgia.)

I find more often than not that there's heavy congestion along that stretch—not necessarily all of it, but enough to be a nuisance almost every time we drive that way. On the most recent trip, we bailed at Exit 18, headed south on parallel US-17 into Hardeeville, saw the massive backup to get back onto I-95, and just stayed on US-17 down to the bridge to Savannah and then back up I-16 to I-95. Who knows whether we actually saved any time. Probably not, but on the other hand, we were moving at 60–65 mph and we got to take a new route, so that always works for me. (Yes, we could have taken SC-170 and GA-25 instead, but we had already been that way on a prior trip and since it was dark I preferred to take the wider road out of concern about things like animals running across the road through the wildlife refuge.)
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Scott5114 on January 07, 2021, 12:12:25 PM
I-37 and I-45 for Oklahoma.

I-45, maybe, since the oil industry in Oklahoma City and Tulsa has a lot of connections to Houston. It's mostly executives traveling back and forth, though, and I imagine they fly. There are some people that enjoy Galveston as a vacation spot.

I-37 is a lot more of a stretch. Corpus and South Padre is a vacation destination, but doesn't have similar industry draw that I-45 has. I would imagine I-2 has the same amount of importance as I-37 would.

The fact of the matter is that the most important out-of-state destination for Oklahoma is Dallas, which is well served by routes that do enter Oklahoma. Most Oklahomans see "Dallas" when they hear "Texas" and don't have much reason to go elsewhere in Texas.

One possibility that I considered is I-55, since it continues the US-66 route into Chicago. At the other end, you could plausibly count I-15, CA-110, or whatever other routes replaced US-66.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: KCRoadFan on January 07, 2021, 12:13:52 PM
Another one I thought of - I-80 for Colorado. It connects to I-25 in Cheyenne, WY and I-76 in western Nebraska - the primary routes into Denver from the north.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 07, 2021, 12:36:11 PM
I-37 and I-45 for Oklahoma.

I-45, maybe, since the oil industry in Oklahoma City and Tulsa has a lot of connections to Houston. It's mostly executives traveling back and forth, though, and I imagine they fly. There are some people that enjoy Galveston as a vacation spot.

I-37 is a lot more of a stretch. Corpus and South Padre is a vacation destination, but doesn't have similar industry draw that I-45 has. I would imagine I-2 has the same amount of importance as I-37 would.

The fact of the matter is that the most important out-of-state destination for Oklahoma is Dallas, which is well served by routes that do enter Oklahoma. Most Oklahomans see "Dallas" when they hear "Texas" and don't have much reason to go elsewhere in Texas.

One possibility that I considered is I-55, since it continues the US-66 route into Chicago. At the other end, you could plausibly count I-15, CA-110, or whatever other routes replaced US-66.

The reason I say I-37 is because I have always seen it as the South Texas version of I-35E/I-35W where I-35E=I-37 and I-35W=I-35.  All that funnels north.  I agree that The Corpus Christi oil industry is a shell of the Galveston-Houston oil industry, but I do think some Corpus Christi originated traffic makes it's way to Oklahoma. 
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 07, 2021, 02:04:42 PM
I-37 and I-45 for Oklahoma.

I-45, maybe, since the oil industry in Oklahoma City and Tulsa has a lot of connections to Houston. It's mostly executives traveling back and forth, though, and I imagine they fly. There are some people that enjoy Galveston as a vacation spot.

I-37 is a lot more of a stretch. Corpus and South Padre is a vacation destination, but doesn't have similar industry draw that I-45 has. I would imagine I-2 has the same amount of importance as I-37 would.

The fact of the matter is that the most important out-of-state destination for Oklahoma is Dallas, which is well served by routes that do enter Oklahoma. Most Oklahomans see "Dallas" when they hear "Texas" and don't have much reason to go elsewhere in Texas.

One possibility that I considered is I-55, since it continues the US-66 route into Chicago. At the other end, you could plausibly count I-15, CA-110, or whatever other routes replaced US-66.
Kind of wondering, how important is I-70 to Oklahoma for long distance travel compared to the other ones that got mentioned? It's involved on every routing from Oklahoma to most cities in the northeast, Ohio, Ontario, Michigan east of Lansing, and parts of Indiana.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Konza on January 07, 2021, 02:15:45 PM
Wondering what this might be for Arizona.  One could offer up I-11, but that would be temporary at best, and the US routes it’s multiplexed with continue into Arizona.

I’d offer up I-20, which, with I-30, connects most of the East Coast to the Phoenix and Tucson areas.  I-44 would be another possibility, but I question whether a route that feeds into I-40 is as important as one that feeds into I-10.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 07, 2021, 02:55:23 PM
Wondering what this might be for Arizona.  One could offer up I-11, but that would be temporary at best, and the US routes it’s multiplexed with continue into Arizona.

I’d offer up I-20, which, with I-30, connects most of the East Coast to the Phoenix and Tucson areas.  I-44 would be another possibility, but I question whether a route that feeds into I-40 is as important as one that feeds into I-10.

Word.  I think I-20 and I-30 are important to New Mexico, Arizona and California. 
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: JayhawkCO on January 07, 2021, 05:06:26 PM
I obviously agree with I-80 for Colorado.

For Utah, I'd submit US160.  Would be useful for anyone going from Phoenix to Moab as well as anyone coming from New Mexico towards that direction. It just misses entering Utah by about 500 feet too.  There aren't a ton of great options, but that seems like the one that leads towards the biggest population centers.  The only other one I could even possibly justify would be AZ67, as a lot of people stay in Kanab to get to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Chris
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Scott5114 on January 07, 2021, 06:41:51 PM
If ever there was an obvious answer for a state, that is it for Nebraska. I would go so far as to say I-29 would be it for Kansas as well.

I-49 is another good option for Kansas—of course, serving the exact same function as I-29, but south of Kansas City rather than north of it.

The reason I say I-37 is because I have always seen it as the South Texas version of I-35E/I-35W where I-35E=I-37 and I-35W=I-35.  All that funnels north.  I agree that The Corpus Christi oil industry is a shell of the Galveston-Houston oil industry, but I do think some Corpus Christi originated traffic makes it's way to Oklahoma. 

Sure, but is Corpus-originating traffic important to Oklahoma? Doubt it. You may as well say that the answer for Oklahoma is I-29 because it allows Omaha traffic to reach Oklahoma. Yes, it's true, but we don't really have any ties to Omaha either.

Wondering what this might be for Arizona.  [...]  I-44 would be another possibility, but I question whether a route that feeds into I-40 is as important as one that feeds into I-10.

On the other hand, I-44 is an excellent candidate for New Mexico, because I-40 is far more important to NM than I-10 is. I-44 is also a possible candidate for California (though that state is so large and has so many roads feeding into the roads that lead there that there are far more contenders).
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: KCRoadFan on January 07, 2021, 06:54:35 PM
For Iowa: I-88. Drops you right into downtown Chicago, plus almost any other regionally significant roads that Iowans use would just go through the state.

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.
Here's my options for FL:
I-24: Part of fastest route from FL to most points northwest of the state, notably cities in the Midwest west of Ohio like Indianapolis, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Minneapolis, and even a far flung city like Seattle (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Seattle,+WA/Miami,+FL/@39.9796291,-109.1798675,4.73z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x5490102c93e83355:0x102565466944d59a!2m2!1d-122.3320708!2d47.6062095!1m5!1m1!1s0x88d9b0a20ec8c111:0xff96f271ddad4f65!2m2!1d-80.1917902!2d25.7616798!3e0)
I-77: Part of fastest route from FL to cities like Charlotte, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Toronto

It really depends on what part of Florida you’re talking about. As for the Panhandle/Emerald Coast area (“Redneck Riviera”), I would say I-65 and I-85 are the most important out-of-state roads. Those highways meet in Montgomery, Alabama; from there, US 331 takes off heading south through Luverne, Opp, and DeFuniak Springs before eventually meeting US 98 east of Destin. I’m sure that for that reason, the two interstates that I mentioned are rather crowded during spring break, and also throughout the summer. Is that right?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: US 89 on January 07, 2021, 07:08:24 PM
For Utah, I'd submit US160.  Would be useful for anyone going from Phoenix to Moab as well as anyone coming from New Mexico towards that direction. It just misses entering Utah by about 500 feet too.  There aren't a ton of great options, but that seems like the one that leads towards the biggest population centers.  The only other one I could even possibly justify would be AZ67, as a lot of people stay in Kanab to get to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Maybe US-64? I recognize the part of Utah near there is relatively isolated from the rest of the state, of course.

I'm not sure I agree with either 64 or 160. Those routes are useful for tourists wanting to get to Utah, but they really aren't all that important to Utah itself given the vast majority of the state's population lives along the I-15 corridor in the northern part of the state (unless you're counting economic implications from tourist revenue).

There are very few destinations for which the fastest route there from northern Utah uses significant mileage on US 64 or 160. Most long-distance traffic would only use brief portions of those routes.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: JayhawkCO on January 07, 2021, 07:17:27 PM
On the other hand, I-44 is an excellent candidate for New Mexico, because I-40 is far more important to NM than I-10 is. I-44 is also a possible candidate for California (though that state is so large and has so many roads feeding into the roads that lead there that there are far more contenders).

Interestingly, I think for New Mexico, you could also nominate I-15.  I know it's a ways away, but anything coming from Southern California or the Pacific Northwest to New Mexico is going to take that road either in California or Utah.

Chris
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 07, 2021, 08:03:05 PM
For Iowa: I-88. Drops you right into downtown Chicago, plus almost any other regionally significant roads that Iowans use would just go through the state.

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.
Here's my options for FL:
I-24: Part of fastest route from FL to most points northwest of the state, notably cities in the Midwest west of Ohio like Indianapolis, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Minneapolis, and even a far flung city like Seattle (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Seattle,+WA/Miami,+FL/@39.9796291,-109.1798675,4.73z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x5490102c93e83355:0x102565466944d59a!2m2!1d-122.3320708!2d47.6062095!1m5!1m1!1s0x88d9b0a20ec8c111:0xff96f271ddad4f65!2m2!1d-80.1917902!2d25.7616798!3e0)
I-77: Part of fastest route from FL to cities like Charlotte, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Toronto

It really depends on what part of Florida you’re talking about. As for the Panhandle/Emerald Coast area (“Redneck Riviera”), I would say I-65 and I-85 are the most important out-of-state roads. Those highways meet in Montgomery, Alabama; from there, US 331 takes off heading south through Luverne, Opp, and DeFuniak Springs before eventually meeting US 98 east of Destin. I’m sure that for that reason, the two interstates that I mentioned are rather crowded during spring break, and also throughout the summer. Is that right?
Yes, I-65/I-85 are the choices for the panhandle. I was only thinking of the main penisula part of FL (not sure if there's a better name), which you already have I-75 and I-95 for N-S traffic from there. Of course those two routes aren't as viable for the panhandle compared to I-65 and I-85. I just ended up choosing 2 of the closest main feeders for I-75 and I-95 into FL, which I had as I-24 for I-75, and I-77 for I-95.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: JCinSummerfield on January 08, 2021, 12:34:39 PM
For Michigan I'll say probably US-20 or I-80/90.
Ontario 401 or 402.


For Yoopers, it might be I-39
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Hot Rod Hootenanny on January 08, 2021, 01:13:46 PM
For 35 states, the most important route that never enters them is I-95
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: thspfc on January 08, 2021, 01:14:19 PM
For 35 states, the most important route that never enters them is I-95
:-D
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 08, 2021, 01:25:54 PM
For Michigan I'll say probably US-20 or I-80/90.
Ontario 401 or 402.

For Yoopers, it might be I-39


Does it count when a route cannot legally go into the territory?  Like crossing international boundaries?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: hbelkins on January 08, 2021, 02:50:16 PM
If ever there was an obvious answer for a state, that is it for Nebraska. I would go so far as to say I-29 would be it for Kansas as well.

I-49 is another good option for Kansas—of course, serving the exact same function as I-29, but south of Kansas City rather than north of it.

Based on what I've seen every time I've traveled I-24 in western Kentucky, it appears to be pretty important to Kansans as well. I see lots of Kansas and Missouri plates on I-24.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on January 08, 2021, 03:31:35 PM
US 18 is another one I keep coming back to for MN because a short piece of it is part of the Avenue of the Saints, bridging I-35 and US 218 both of which obviously enter Minnesota.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: hobsini2 on January 09, 2021, 03:00:18 PM
I don't think Utah really has one, since most long-distance corridors you'd take to get places from Utah pass through it. Maybe US 30 or 93, but really those are more useful for people in the small towns along them to get to Salt Lake rather than the other way around. Plus 30 isn't really that important of a route since it largely follows I-80 and I-84.

US 550 might be another option, since that's a big part of going SE from Salt Lake to really anywhere in the US south of I-40 and west of I-65.

Maybe US-64? I recognize the part of Utah near there is relatively isolated from the rest of the state, of course.
Actually, I would think I-40 for Utah and Nevada. Yes it is a long way south of Utah but I am thinking in terms of a pretty close trans continental highway.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: hobsini2 on January 09, 2021, 03:07:20 PM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
You could make a case for I-15 bringing traffic up from Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: hobsini2 on January 09, 2021, 03:09:17 PM
....

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.

I was looking at a map and I wonder whether I-185 might work as Florida's candidate. At first blush it seems odd to suggest a 3di as an "important" route, but looking at a map suggests that if I-185 extended south to I-10 (whether as I-185 or as a route with some other number), it would provide a logical all-Interstate-grade route from both Tallahassee and the Florida Panhandle to Atlanta and other points to the northeast.
Yeah Florida is hard. I think though you could make a case for US 82 since it is mostly a 4 lane divided highway and goes well west.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: planxtymcgillicuddy on January 09, 2021, 05:30:16 PM
....

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.

I was looking at a map and I wonder whether I-185 might work as Florida's candidate. At first blush it seems odd to suggest a 3di as an "important" route, but looking at a map suggests that if I-185 extended south to I-10 (whether as I-185 or as a route with some other number), it would provide a logical all-Interstate-grade route from both Tallahassee and the Florida Panhandle to Atlanta and other points to the northeast.
Yeah Florida is hard. I think though you could make a case for US 82 since it is mostly a 4 lane divided highway and goes well west.

I'd argue that I-16 is the most important route that doesnt enter Florida
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: dlsterner on January 09, 2021, 05:35:43 PM
I agree that Florida is tough.  Disclosure - I lived in the Florida panhandle (Fort Walton Beach) for many years.

Here is an idea (from a Panhandle point of view):  AL 55.  About 30-ish years ago, much of it was upgraded to a high speed four lane highway in the middle of nowhere.  Presumably meant to be used for hurricane evacuation.  When that was done, it became the (IMHO) best way to get from Montgomery to Fort Walton Beach (and the Destin resorts).  I-65 to AL 55 to Andalusia then US 29 to AL 137 / FL 189, where before I would use US 331 to Florala.

FWIW, when AL 55 enters Florala, it then heads south and becomes FL 85.

On a grander scale, you could also make a case for I-65 for the same reasons AL 55.  From the north they feed in a lot of traffic heading to the Panhandle resorts.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: jakeroot on January 09, 2021, 05:45:33 PM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
You could make a case for I-15 bringing traffic up from Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix.

That, or possibly I-90.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: STLmapboy on January 09, 2021, 05:48:46 PM
Iowa State Route 27. Part of Ave of the Saints, direct four lane connection between STL and Twin Cities.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 09, 2021, 05:56:01 PM
Iowa State Route 27. Part of Ave of the Saints, direct four lane connection between STL and Twin Cities.
Even over I-24, which was mentioned for St. Louis earlier in the thread a couple of times?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ilpt4u on January 09, 2021, 06:04:37 PM
Iowa State Route 27. Part of Ave of the Saints, direct four lane connection between STL and Twin Cities.
Iowa 27 is a Multi-state route, as it continues into MO as MO 27 and is part of the larger Avenue of the Saints
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Max Rockatansky on January 09, 2021, 10:30:15 PM
I agree that Florida is tough.  Disclosure - I lived in the Florida panhandle (Fort Walton Beach) for many years.

Here is an idea (from a Panhandle point of view):  AL 55.  About 30-ish years ago, much of it was upgraded to a high speed four lane highway in the middle of nowhere.  Presumably meant to be used for hurricane evacuation.  When that was done, it became the (IMHO) best way to get from Montgomery to Fort Walton Beach (and the Destin resorts).  I-65 to AL 55 to Andalusia then US 29 to AL 137 / FL 189, where before I would use US 331 to Florala.

FWIW, when AL 55 enters Florala, it then heads south and becomes FL 85.

On a grander scale, you could also make a case for I-65 for the same reasons AL 55.  From the north they feed in a lot of traffic heading to the Panhandle resorts.

For Florida it definitely is I-65.  The Pensacola Area gets a crap ton of traffic (lots of Snow Birds too) that take I-65 to the panhandle.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Roadgeekteen on January 09, 2021, 11:39:45 PM
For Massachusetts, I could see CT 15 being it because of it's role for Boston to New York travel.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: pianocello on January 10, 2021, 07:54:18 AM
(quote clipped)

For Florida it definitely is I-65.  The Pensacola Area gets a crap ton of traffic (lots of Snow Birds too) that take I-65 to the panhandle.

That's the fun part of this exercise for Florida. I-65 is the obvious choice for the Panhandle, but people in the peninsula have very little reason to use it. Same deal with I-16 mentioned upthread (could be useful for JAX residents, but not much else). It's cool to see different perspectives from different parts of the state in this thread.

FWIW, I personally would say I-24. But at the same time, I'm pretty sure most drivers to/from Florida are either heading in a different direction than me or not driving as far.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Sctvhound on January 10, 2021, 04:30:45 PM
For South Carolina, I’d say I-75. The main route to go to central and southwest Florida if you want to avoid I-4, and major through GA and TN as a indirect route, where many, many South Carolinians are traveling.

Almost everybody going to Tampa or Orlando from Charleston takes 95-295-301 at Baldwin, through Starke and Ocala, over to 75. So many SC plates on that route.

By region, it is way different, but we are going by state. I-95 is it unquestionably in the Charleston area, even though it stays 40-50 miles west of the coast. Exit 33 (Point South, US 17) is the main exit to get to Charleston from anywhere south.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: bing101 on January 10, 2021, 04:38:12 PM
For California I-11 because it deals with Las Vegas, to Northern Arizona and in proposed cases to Reno. If I-11 were to be built in its full length it might offset traffic away from I-10, I-15 and I-40.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: wriddle082 on January 10, 2021, 07:52:28 PM
For Ohio, it’s I-64.  Comes within a couple of miles of the border in the Huntington area, and it carries a lot of southern Ohioans towards I-77 and roads leading to Myrtle Beach and FL.  Honorable mention to the I-86 Shortway in NY and PA.

For South Carolina, it’s I-40.  It brings a lot of folks from the Midwest to I-26, which is SC’s most important interstate.

For Tennessee, it’s probably I-59.  Mainly because quite a few important interstates run through it already.  In fact, it’s probably the only state with (3) 2di’s ending in 5.

And for Kentucky, it’s also I-40.  It brings a lot of traffic to I-24, I-65, and I-75.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 10, 2021, 08:05:27 PM
For Ohio, it’s I-64.  Comes within a couple of miles of the border in the Huntington area, and it carries a lot of southern Ohioans towards I-77 and roads leading to Myrtle Beach and FL.  Honorable mention to the I-86 Shortway in NY and PA.
Interesting to see that I-64 has such a vital use for Southern Ohio, as the nearest interstate for that region. I mentioned I-65 for the 3C cities earlier in the thread (quoted below).
I'll go with I-65 for Ohio. Until I-69 is finished in KY and TN, which then the WK Parkway/I-71 can serve as a spur of I-69 into Ohio, I-65 is part of the fastest route from at least Cincinnati, Columbus and Cleveland via I-71 to cities in the south like Houston (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/US 59), Dallas (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30), Austin/San Antonio (I-71/I-65/I-40/I-30/I-35) and New Orleans (I-71/I-65/I-59) and points beyond like Mexico or closer points like Memphis or Nashville. I-65 is also part of the fastest route from Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus to Chicago and Milwaukee, and part of one of 2 options (along with I-74/I-39) to Madison and the Twin Cities.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: planxtymcgillicuddy on January 10, 2021, 08:36:00 PM
For Ohio, it’s I-64.  Comes within a couple of miles of the border in the Huntington area, and it carries a lot of southern Ohioans towards I-77 and roads leading to Myrtle Beach and FL.  Honorable mention to the I-86 Shortway in NY and PA.

For South Carolina, it’s I-40.  It brings a lot of folks from the Midwest to I-26, which is SC’s most important interstate.

For Tennessee, it’s probably I-59.  Mainly because quite a few important interstates run through it already.  In fact, it’s probably the only state with (3) 2di’s ending in 5.

And for Kentucky, it’s also I-40.  It brings a lot of traffic to I-24, I-65, and I-75.

I'm with you on all but Tennessee-I think I-20 holds more importance for Tennessee than 59 does
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Sctvhound on January 10, 2021, 08:48:35 PM
Yup. I-40 is very important for SC. Especially for folks down by Wilmington who want to get to Myrtle Beach. And to go anywhere in TN, KY, other states you have to use 40 from Asheville.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: fillup420 on January 10, 2021, 09:08:37 PM
North Carolina is a tricky one. I initially thought of I-81, but then I thought about how often I use I-81 as a resident of NC, and I never do. The only time i have used a significant portion of 81 was as an alternate to I-40. Every other significant route around the state does enter it at some point, and there aren’t any major corridors that terminate just short of state lines.


iPad
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: bing101 on January 10, 2021, 10:48:30 PM
Another example I just thought of: for both Nevada and California, one could arguably say I-70. That road has a southwest trajectory as it meets its western end at I-15 in the Utah desert; thus, I-70 traffic segues nicely onto I-15 south toward Las Vegas and, eventually, the “Inland Empire” area of California (and from there, either continuing south on I-15 to San Diego or west on I-10 to Los Angeles).


I remember seeing a map that Interstate Kyle put out one time where I-70 could have gone to Sacramento if it went through the US-50 alignment.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: keithvh on January 10, 2021, 10:59:36 PM
I've seen 2 submissions for Minnesota thus far: WI-35 and US-18.

Could I-39 or even I-294 (Tri-State Tollway) also be considered?  Obviously, if one is going to Milwaukee or Downtown Chicago, they don't need either.  But both routes are important for travel to anywhere else south and east of Chicago-Land, in terms of missing some Chicago congestion.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ftballfan on January 10, 2021, 11:19:48 PM
For Michigan I'll say probably US-20 or I-80/90.
Ontario 401 or 402.
For Yoopers, it might be I-39
[/quote]
IMHO, I-65 is more important than US-20 for Michigan. I-65 (especially from Indy to Nashville, even with that westward jog in KY) is part of the quickest route to anywhere in Florida for most of lower Michigan south and west of a line from about Frankfort to Coldwater
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: KCRoadFan on January 11, 2021, 12:14:48 AM
North Carolina is a tricky one. I initially thought of I-81, but then I thought about how often I use I-81 as a resident of NC, and I never do. The only time i have used a significant portion of 81 was as an alternate to I-40. Every other significant route around the state does enter it at some point, and there aren’t any major corridors that terminate just short of state lines.


iPad

For NC, I suppose there’s an argument for US 58 through Southside Virginia, insofar as it applies to getting to the Outer Banks from points further west along the NC/VA border, in both states (Roanoke Rapids, Henderson, Danville, Mount Airy, etc.) Thoughts?

I’m sure there’s also a case for I-20, what with that road being part of the best route to Charlotte and Greensboro from points west of Atlanta thanks to linking up with I-85 in that city.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: SkyPesos on January 11, 2021, 12:21:44 AM
North Carolina is a tricky one. I initially thought of I-81, but then I thought about how often I use I-81 as a resident of NC, and I never do. The only time i have used a significant portion of 81 was as an alternate to I-40. Every other significant route around the state does enter it at some point, and there aren’t any major corridors that terminate just short of state lines.


iPad
This one is a bit far fetched for NC, but how about US 35? It's part of every routing from Midwest cities from Columbus westward to NC metro areas like Raleigh-Durham, Greensboro-Winstom Salem, Wilmington and sometimes Charlotte. And Seattle-NC (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Seattle,+WA/Wilmington,+NC/@40.8644298,-107.2354339,4.53z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x5490102c93e83355:0x102565466944d59a!2m2!1d-122.3320708!2d47.6062095!1m5!1m1!1s0x89a9f5a20debaed5:0x5e66493884093032!2m2!1d-77.8868117!2d34.2103894!3e0) for anyone that drives that far.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Roadsguy on January 11, 2021, 01:31:00 AM
Pennsylvania is tricky since its position spanning almost the entire base of the northeast means that all major Interstates and US routes enter PA (e.g. I-95, I-70, I-80, I-81, US 1, US 30, etc.). The only way around it is to go directly from DE to NJ across the Delaware River/Bay. The only three routes that do this are I-295 and US 40 (both on the Delaware Memorial Bridge) and US 9 (on the Cape May–Lewes Ferry). I-295 and US 40 both enter PA elsewhere, so that just leaves US 9, which isn't exactly a "most important" anything.

Since no major long-distance routes completely bypass PA, this just leaves nearby major routes that can be used to get to PA via one of the routes that does enter it. I-71 and I-77 are the two that seem to best qualify, perhaps also I-87. To forcibly include a US route, I'd say US 50, but no one would use that route for long-distance travel since the region is well served by parallel Interstates.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ran4sh on January 11, 2021, 01:59:02 AM

For Tennessee, it’s probably I-59.  Mainly because quite a few important interstates run through it already.  In fact, it’s probably the only state with (3) 2di’s ending in 5.


Georgia has 75, 85, and 95, although I think you're right about there not being any other states with three x5 Interstates.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Bickendan on January 11, 2021, 02:25:11 AM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
You could make a case for I-15 bringing traffic up from Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix.

That, or possibly I-90.
I could accept those.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: DandyDan on January 11, 2021, 02:54:29 AM
I've seen 2 submissions for Minnesota thus far: WI-35 and US-18.

Could I-39 or even I-294 (Tri-State Tollway) also be considered?  Obviously, if one is going to Milwaukee or Downtown Chicago, they don't need either.  But both routes are important for travel to anywhere else south and east of Chicago-Land, in terms of missing some Chicago congestion.
Someone upthread said I-29, although I think some people were dismissive of it. That's probably because it will not get you to the Twin Cities. It is my belief if you start somewhere south of Sioux City and wish to go somewhere west of US 71, or if you are close to the MN 60 corridor,  you will use it at some point.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Crown Victoria on January 11, 2021, 08:38:36 AM
Pennsylvania is tricky since its position spanning almost the entire base of the northeast means that all major Interstates and US routes enter PA (e.g. I-95, I-70, I-80, I-81, US 1, US 30, etc.). The only way around it is to go directly from DE to NJ across the Delaware River/Bay. The only three routes that do this are I-295 and US 40 (both on the Delaware Memorial Bridge) and US 9 (on the Cape May–Lewes Ferry). I-295 and US 40 both enter PA elsewhere, so that just leaves US 9, which isn't exactly a "most important" anything.

Since no major long-distance routes completely bypass PA, this just leaves nearby major routes that can be used to get to PA via one of the routes that does enter it. I-71 and I-77 are the two that seem to best qualify, perhaps also I-87. To forcibly include a US route, I'd say US 50, but no one would use that route for long-distance travel since the region is well served by parallel Interstates.

For PA, the New Jersey Turnpike mainline. It is the main route for traffic from NYC and New England to travel south and links to the only roadway that bypasses PA entirely (Delaware Memorial Bridge).

*The NJ Turnpike counts despite also carrying I-95 (which enters PA) because only part of the Turnpike is I-95. If one wishes we can consider the unsigned NJ 700 portion of the Turnpike as the "most important route".

Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: doorknob60 on January 11, 2021, 05:54:04 PM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
You could make a case for I-15 bringing traffic up from Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix.

That, or possibly I-90.
I could accept those.

I could also make the argument for I-80. Long distance traffic (eg. anywhere east of Utah) traveling to Oregon will likely use I-80 (more likely than I-90). I-80 provides connections to Eastern Oregon via US-95 and US-395, though admittedly insignificant compared to I-84 (most traffic using those two routes will be crossing I-80 more than actually using it, eg. traffic from Reno or Vegas). And adding in this one puts it over the top IMO, it's part of the route between the San Francisco area and anywhere in Oregon, along with I-505 and I-5.

I think it's more important than I-15 at least, but I-90 and WA-14 are just as good of contenders. WA-14 gets points for being a major detour route if I-84 has to close in the gorge. Whether it be for general winter weather, wildfires, derailed trains, etc., I've seen WA-14 used as a detour for I-84 many times.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 11, 2021, 06:17:16 PM
Has I-70 for California been mentioned?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: KCRoadFan on January 11, 2021, 09:38:08 PM
Has I-70 for California been mentioned?

It has been.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: dkblake on January 11, 2021, 10:04:01 PM
For Massachusetts, I could see CT 15 being it because of it's role for Boston to New York travel.

Seconded- Boston being the focal point of the New England interstate system makes Massachusetts a challenging one for this, since either roads go into Mass or (like NH 101) explicitly provide non-Mass intrastate corridors. The second tier would probably be I-89 and I-287.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: The Nature Boy on January 11, 2021, 10:17:23 PM
I'll tackle the New England states not otherwise mentioned:

Vermont: I-87, it's the primary route that one might travel to get to Burlington from NYC. If not for the tiny bit of I-93 that enters St. Johnsbury, the answer would be I-93.

I'm having trouble with Maine though. My temptation is to say NH 101 because it essentially serves as a connector for Portland and Manchester (and basically anywhere else in NH).
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: dkblake on January 12, 2021, 08:37:29 AM
I'll tackle the New England states not otherwise mentioned:

Vermont: I-87, it's the primary route that one might travel to get to Burlington from NYC. If not for the tiny bit of I-93 that enters St. Johnsbury, the answer would be I-93.

I'm having trouble with Maine though. My temptation is to say NH 101 because it essentially serves as a connector for Portland and Manchester (and basically anywhere else in NH).

I-495?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1995hoo on January 12, 2021, 09:06:14 AM
....

I'm having trouble with Maine though. My temptation is to say NH 101 because it essentially serves as a connector for Portland and Manchester (and basically anywhere else in NH).

The Trans-Canada Highway might qualify if you consider it as one route instead of as a series of separately-numbered highways in Quebec and New Brunswick (limiting it to those two provinces because they're the only ones that border Maine). No reason to limit the discussion to highways located solely in the USA.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: webny99 on January 12, 2021, 09:11:18 AM
For New York, it might be I-80. It sounds absurd, but there are not a lot of other good options.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 12, 2021, 09:48:45 AM
....

I'm having trouble with Maine though. My temptation is to say NH 101 because it essentially serves as a connector for Portland and Manchester (and basically anywhere else in NH).

The Trans-Canada Highway might qualify if you consider it as one route instead of as a series of separately-numbered highways in Quebec and New Brunswick (limiting it to those two provinces because they're the only ones that border Maine). No reason to limit the discussion to highways located solely in the USA.

I asked this question and didn't get a response.  Do routes that can't legally enter a state/province count?  For Quebec I could say it would be I-89, but that's only because the designation can't enter the province.  The pavement enters the province and continues as (future) A-35.

Same thing with I-35 being the most important route to Nuevo Leon, but that's again only because the designation can only legally go to the border. 
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: vdeane on January 12, 2021, 12:53:26 PM
Given that I-35 stops several blocks north of the border, it arguably counts either way.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: X99 on January 12, 2021, 07:01:29 PM
For South Dakota...

I got nothing. Maybe MN 60 or I-25, but I think both of those are a stretch. How would you even determine a "most important route" for a state with two completely separate population centers?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: JayhawkCO on January 12, 2021, 07:11:03 PM
For South Dakota...

I got nothing. Maybe MN 60 or I-25, but I think both of those are a stretch. How would you even determine a "most important route" for a state with two completely separate population centers?

I think for South Dakota, I'd go a little farther afield and go either I-35 (connecting to I-29), I-49 (similar, especially once finished), or maybe even MB-75.  There's nothing particularly close to a border anywhere that carries much traffic.

Chris
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: The Nature Boy on January 12, 2021, 07:16:44 PM
I'll tackle the New England states not otherwise mentioned:

Vermont: I-87, it's the primary route that one might travel to get to Burlington from NYC. If not for the tiny bit of I-93 that enters St. Johnsbury, the answer would be I-93.

I'm having trouble with Maine though. My temptation is to say NH 101 because it essentially serves as a connector for Portland and Manchester (and basically anywhere else in NH).

I-495?

I considered I-495 because of its role in funneling Maine traffic to points south of Boston but I feel like a road that avoids Boston doesn't work for Maine, given how important the city is for all of New England. But I can see the argument.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: X99 on January 13, 2021, 10:37:53 AM
For South Dakota...

I got nothing. Maybe MN 60 or I-25, but I think both of those are a stretch. How would you even determine a "most important route" for a state with two completely separate population centers?

I think for South Dakota, I'd go a little farther afield and go either I-35 (connecting to I-29), I-49 (similar, especially once finished), or maybe even MB-75.  There's nothing particularly close to a border anywhere that carries much traffic.

Chris

In that case, I think I'll just pick one route for each population center. For East River, I-35 fits the position better than MN 60. For West River, I-25 still seems to be the best option, with US 20 becoming a possibility once the Heartland Expressway is finished to that point.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Mark68 on January 13, 2021, 02:02:48 PM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
You could make a case for I-15 bringing traffic up from Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix.

I'd say I-80 might be a better example for bringing traffic from Denver (via I-84). I've traveled between Portland & Denver using primarily I-80 thru WY to I-84 in UT.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: JayhawkCO on January 13, 2021, 02:24:06 PM
I'm hardpressed to think of one for Oregon. Best I'm coming up with is WA 14 (with possibly WA 4) or US 12.
You could make a case for I-15 bringing traffic up from Salt Lake, Denver, Las Vegas and Phoenix.

I'd say I-80 might be a better example for bringing traffic from Denver (via I-84). I've traveled between Portland & Denver using primarily I-80 thru WY to I-84 in UT.

Even if people did take I-80 west into Utah, they'd still be utilizing I-15 after I-80.  So if you made I-15 the "more important route", you'd get all those that came across on I-80 from Wyoming plus anyone in Utah.

Chris
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: roadman65 on January 13, 2021, 02:32:57 PM
I-95 is for Florida as the East Coast uses it to vacation or patronize the developers here and become permanent residents.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: 1 on January 13, 2021, 02:38:02 PM
I-95 is for Florida as the East Coast uses it to vacation or patronize the developers here and become permanent residents.

Did you read the thread title?
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: kphoger on January 13, 2021, 02:42:36 PM
I see I-49/US-71 and I-29 have both been suggested for Kansas, and ... ehhh ... I'm not so sure how important they are to Kansas.

But that just goes to show that this is a tough question for Kansas.  Both I-435 and I-635 (KC bypasses) exist in Kansas, so they're out.  I-29 might still fit the bill anyway, but just because it serves the KC airport.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: JayhawkCO on January 13, 2021, 02:58:26 PM
I see I-49/US-71 and I-29 have both been suggested for Kansas, and ... ehhh ... I'm not so sure how important they are to Kansas.

But that just goes to show that this is a tough question for Kansas.  Both I-435 and I-635 (KC bypasses) exist in Kansas, so they're out.  I-29 might still fit the bill anyway, but just because it serves the KC airport.

Given that most of the population in KS in in the eastern half, I think we can safely eliminate anything to the west.  Since there's not much directly north or south of the state line (other than OKC which I-35 disqualifies and Tulsa which US75 disqualifies), I think you have to go something just east of the state line.  I'd personally say right now, I-29 gets the nod.  Once I-49 is finished all the way through Arkansas, that might end up being the most highly used freight route to get to/from Kansas.

Chris
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: kphoger on January 13, 2021, 03:06:45 PM
For Texas, I'd say Carr. Fed. 85 in Mexico for reasons of international freight shipping.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: CoreySamson on January 13, 2021, 03:10:49 PM
For Louisiana, I'd think I-65's probably the way to go. One could probably make a case for I-45, though.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: ethanhopkin14 on January 13, 2021, 03:14:55 PM
For Louisiana, I'd think I-65's probably the way to go. One could probably make a case for I-45, though.

I say I-45.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: doorknob60 on January 13, 2021, 04:32:24 PM
(...) WA-14 are just as good of contenders. WA-14 gets points for being a major detour route if I-84 has to close in the gorge. Whether it be for general winter weather, wildfires, derailed trains, etc., I've seen WA-14 used as a detour for I-84 many times.

Just 2 days later, a landslide has closed Eastbound I-84 and proven my point. I'm pretty convinced that WA-14 is the most important out of state highway in Oregon (though I still think I-80 is a strong contender). Here's a fun look at the traffic on the Bridge of the Gods detouring there.

(https://i.imgur.com/NeVaQVY.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/BkzHUfL.jpg)

For what it's worth, WA-14 is also closed further east from the bridge (just beyond Stevenson), so all traffic heading east of there (eg. to Hood River/White Salmon or beyond) must cross over to Oregon and can't continue on WA-14. Someone travelling from Troutdale, OR to White Salmon, WA would be required to cross the Columbia 3 times and pay 2 tolls (unless the bridges are waiving them, which I don't think they are).
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: MikieTimT on January 13, 2021, 05:41:43 PM
Interesting topic. I'm doing all the states where I lived.

I never lived in Arkansas, but I'm going to say it's I-69 because they're obsessed with it coming to their state.

I wouldn't say at all that Arkansas is obsessed with I-69.  Funding priorities for the next 20 years indicates that Arkansas is obsessed with its 4 corners with expanding the roads connecting Little Rock to anything else, 4 lanes program, I-49, and I-57.  With the exception of the lightly populated area that I-69 would travel through, the rest of the state could care less other than the thought of interstate traffic that won't traverse I-49 or I-55 having a way to bypass Little Rock.  If there's an obsession in this state, it comes from the capital hoarding the vast majority of the highway funds.
Title: Re: For each state, what is the most important route that never enters it?
Post by: Avalanchez71 on January 26, 2021, 10:12:28 AM
For Iowa: I-88. Drops you right into downtown Chicago, plus almost any other regionally significant roads that Iowans use would just go through the state.

For Florida: Honestly, I got nothing. This is a tough exercise for a state in the corner of the country with a bunch of road connections to many different places.
Here's my options for FL:
I-24: Part of fastest route from FL to most points northwest of the state, notably cities in the Midwest west of Ohio like Indianapolis, Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, Minneapolis, and even a far flung city like Seattle (https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Seattle,+WA/Miami,+FL/@39.9796291,-109.1798675,4.73z/data=!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x5490102c93e83355:0x102565466944d59a!2m2!1d-122.3320708!2d47.6062095!1m5!1m1!1s0x88d9b0a20ec8c111:0xff96f271ddad4f65!2m2!1d-80.1917902!2d25.7616798!3e0)
I-77: Part of fastest route from FL to cities like Charlotte, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Toronto

It really depends on what part of Florida you’re talking about. As for the Panhandle/Emerald Coast area (“Redneck Riviera”), I would say I-65 and I-85 are the most important out-of-state roads. Those highways meet in Montgomery, Alabama; from there, US 331 takes off heading south through Luverne, Opp, and DeFuniak Springs before eventually meeting US 98 east of Destin. I’m sure that for that reason, the two interstates that I mentioned are rather crowded during spring break, and also throughout the summer. Is that right?
Yes, I-65/I-85 are the choices for the panhandle. I was only thinking of the main penisula part of FL (not sure if there's a better name), which you already have I-75 and I-95 for N-S traffic from there. Of course those two routes aren't as viable for the panhandle compared to I-65 and I-85. I just ended up choosing 2 of the closest main feeders for I-75 and I-95 into FL, which I had as I-24 for I-75, and I-77 for I-95.

Throw in US 31.  The tip of US 31 just barely misses FL.