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Northern Virginia HOT Lanes

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1995hoo:
I think extending Metrorail to Prince William County is a very poor idea. Once you get that far out, you're in the domain of commuter rail, such as the VRE. There are existing plans to add capacity to the train tracks across the Potomac and into Union Station that would allow for increased VRE service, and that's arguably a better option for Prince William County (especially if the new tracks are restricted to prohibit freight trains).

Also, Metro has serious capacity problems due to its flawed design in downtown DC where the lines share tunnels. The number of trains that can run through those tunnels is limited by the need for minimum headways, so extending the system further out doesn't mean increased service. It would be far more reasonable to try to figure out a way to come up with the money to add capacity downtown. After that's done, then the idea of further expansion further out might be more viable.

Mapmikey:
Bi-directional flow should be to at least Garrisonville. It is common for NB traffic in the Quantico area to be quite slow during afternoon rush.

The I-15 toll lanes have movable Barriers and caltrans says it takes 2 hours to move the 16 miles. Maybe this would require multiple movers.

Dirt Roads:

--- Quote from: 1995hoo on December 29, 2022, 12:59:04 PM ---I think extending Metrorail to Prince William County is a very poor idea. Once you get that far out, you're in the domain of commuter rail, such as the VRE. There are existing plans to add capacity to the train tracks across the Potomac and into Union Station that would allow for increased VRE service, and that's arguably a better option for Prince William County (especially if the new tracks are restricted to prohibit freight trains).

Also, Metro has serious capacity problems due to its flawed design in downtown DC where the lines share tunnels. The number of trains that can run through those tunnels is limited by the need for minimum headways, so extending the system further out doesn't mean increased service. It would be far more reasonable to try to figure out a way to come up with the money to add capacity downtown. After that's done, then the idea of further expansion further out might be more viable.

--- End quote ---

You make a great point here.  In order to provide the needed line capacity into downtown Washington, at least one of the Potomac River crossings on the Metrorail system would need to be expanded to a triple-track system (or comparable) that can support express trains capable of passing local trains.  But there still appears to be sufficient congestion along the I-95 corridor to financially support its own rapid transit corridor that never leaves Virginia and forces passengers headed for the District to use VRE trains.   The ultimate problem is how to fund three parallel major transportation corridors (I-95, VRE and Metrorail). 

sprjus4:
^ I said it before and Iíll say it again, can VDOT not go through with a P3 with Transurban to lead the I-95 bi-directional express lane project? Use a private company for the majority of the financial contributions to be repayed with toll revenue. They did it with the existing HO/T lanes and the I-495 / I-66 expansions, they can do it again.

It would certainly be a profitable project.

froggie:
^ You can try, but I doubt you'd get the same success as before.  The vast majority of the existing and completed projects were able to be done within the existing ROW, and in I-95's case did not really require replacing existing overpasses.  Given the expense of building new lanes, especially through the ROW chokepoints (looking at Woodbridge and Newington in particular), the ROI will not be there for private companies.

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