Regional Boards > International Highways

Chinese expressways and highways

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1:

--- Quote from: TheGrassGuy on December 10, 2019, 06:13:55 PM ---
--- Quote from: US 89 on December 10, 2019, 03:46:38 PM ---That map is so big it's unreadable.

--- End quote ---
Have you tried waiting awhile?

--- End quote ---

You can scale it down by specifying width and height. Make sure that you don't change the aspect ratio when choosing numbers. Here is the code.

--- Code: ---[img width=800 height=657]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bd/China_National_Expressway_Network_english_-_Copy.svg[/img]
--- End code ---

Most images are automatically scaled down on this forum, but .svg files are not.

Kniwt:

--- Quote from: TheGrassGuy on December 10, 2019, 03:44:14 PM ---Due to legal restrictions on Chinese GPS data, mapping agencies outside of the PRC must misalign their maps of mainland China.

--- End quote ---

Can you say more about this? Are alignments just off by a km or two here and there, or is the discrepancy more severe -- such as, say, I-5 going to San Francisco instead of Sacramento?

Alps:

--- Quote from: Kniwt on December 10, 2019, 10:33:58 PM ---
--- Quote from: TheGrassGuy on December 10, 2019, 03:44:14 PM ---Due to legal restrictions on Chinese GPS data, mapping agencies outside of the PRC must misalign their maps of mainland China.

--- End quote ---

Can you say more about this? Are alignments just off by a km or two here and there, or is the discrepancy more severe -- such as, say, I-5 going to San Francisco instead of Sacramento?

--- End quote ---
I think it's just misaligned globally as opposed to distorted.

Chris:
Chinese expressways tend to have lower design speeds, with 80, 100 and 120 kmh/ appearing to be common. Since a large proportion of China is mountainous, a relatively large share of the expressway system has only an 80 km/h design speed, even in China there is a need to cut cost. There are tens of thousands of miles of expressway that run through incredible terrain. I-70 through the Glenwood Canyon would just look like any other expressway in provinces like Guizhou, Yunnan or Guangxi.

Guizhou province in particular has extremely rugged terrain, most of their expressways have a bridge/tunnel ratio of over 50%, sometimes even exceeding 80%. The province of Guizhou has more high bridges than all other countries in the world combined.

China has also passed the U.S. for having the highest elevation expressways. The highest opened so far is G0613 at Bayan Har Pass at 4829 meters (15,843 ft) above sea level. There are several others that are higher than I-70 through the Eisenhower Tunnel.

Chinese expressways are both numbered and named. Their names are a portmanteau of their endpoints. For example G0613 is named Xili Expressway, short for Xining - Lijiang Expressway. Older expressways tend to have additional multiple names dating back to the initially constructed segments. It is also not uncommon for provincial (S) expressways to be absorbed into a longer national (G) expressway.

Some subdivisions of China are not provinces, but regions, for example Guangxi and Inner Mongolia, but they seem to maintain S-numbering for their expressways.

Much like the U.S., the expressways are developed and owned by the provinces. Each province usually has an expressway development agency and an expressway operation agency. There used to be toll plazas at provincial borders but they are now being scrapped and turned into an interoperable system, the goal was to have this completed by the end of 2019.

Also interesting, China tends to open its new expressways in bursts, the biggest bang is always in the last 10 days of December, when they open thousands of miles of new expressways, but also just before or at national holidays. So the 142,500 km figure will likely exceed 150,000 kilometers by 31 December.

One commonly cited goal of expressway construction is to 'alleviate poverty-stricken areas'. It is seen as very prestigious to have all prefectures and counties in a province linked by expressway. These issues are very often cited in the Chinese media when a new expressway opens or starts construction.

1:

--- Quote from: Kniwt on December 10, 2019, 10:33:58 PM ---
--- Quote from: TheGrassGuy on December 10, 2019, 03:44:14 PM ---Due to legal restrictions on Chinese GPS data, mapping agencies outside of the PRC must misalign their maps of mainland China.

--- End quote ---

Can you say more about this? Are alignments just off by a km or two here and there, or is the discrepancy more severe -- such as, say, I-5 going to San Francisco instead of Sacramento?

--- End quote ---

Someone gave me Python code to fix the misalignment (this was for an internship, but not my current one). It's much less than 1 km.

You can see the difference in satellite view.

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