Illinois: Multi-Year Program: Highway and Multimodal

Started by rte66man, June 18, 2024, 09:11:33 AM

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rte66man

I did not see a thread on this, but mods feel free to merge if needed.

Quote(The Center Square) – Illinois has embarked on a record-setting transportation upgrade program. The state will spend more than $41 billion to build and repair transportation infrastructure. It is the largest investment in state history and will involve all 102 Illinois counties.

https://idot.illinois.gov/transportation-system/transportation-management/transportation-improvement-programs/myp.html
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ilpt4u

#1
Is this funded as part of the previous gas tax increase and capital spending plan? Or is this a separate initiative?

Pretty sure this is part of the capital bill paid with gambling and increased gas taxes. The link on the last page of that thread is the same link posted here:
https://www.aaroads.com/forum/index.php?topic=25022.0
Quote from: 3467 on October 21, 2019, 02:31:10 PMhttp://www.idot.illinois.gov/transportation-system/transportation-management/transportation-improvement-programs-/multi-modal-transportation-improvement-program/index

The Herrin Rd extension to the new Walkers Bluff Casino on the Jackson/Williamson county line is shown on here. Haven't seen much reporting on that route lately

IL 13's last section of 4-lane between Carbondale and Marion at Crab Orchard Lake is on here to be expanded to 6-lane

I-57's 6-lane project is shown including the Marion/I-24 Split segment as well as the Rend Lake Area segment both for FY 2025

The new IL 3 alignment in E St Louis is also on this project list

Rick Powell

#2
Quote from: ilpt4u on June 18, 2024, 10:46:53 PMIs this funded as part of the previous gas tax increase and capital spending plan? Or is this a separate initiative?


Nothing except the FY 2025 annual program can be considered to be "funded" because those projects are aligned with the budget just passed by the General Assembly. The others, identified in FY 2026-30, can be considered "programmed" but not yet funded, and some of them will make it into next year's budget. These are the entirety of the state road program; they are not all Rebuild Illinois capital program projects; a good portion are funded by Federal formula funds, special Federal funds and grants with matching state funding, some are state MFT funded, and some are funded by the Rebuild Illinois program.

jnewkirk77

I noticed several Southern Illinois projects which refer to "Smart Overlay." That's actually an acronym, for "Surface Maintenance At the Right Time." Basically they're putting a thinner asphalt overlay on a road that needs minimal work now, to extend its life. Pretty good idea. I wonder what the cost is compared to, say, Indiana's approach of using chipsealing on everything, even 4-lane roads.  :rolleyes:

Found more on it in this article: https://www.equipmentworld.com/roadbuilding/article/14960081/asphalt-today

mgk920

Quote from: jnewkirk77 on June 19, 2024, 12:28:46 PMI noticed several Southern Illinois projects which refer to "Smart Overlay." That's actually an acronym, for "Surface Maintenance At the Right Time." Basically they're putting a thinner asphalt overlay on a road that needs minimal work now, to extend its life. Pretty good idea. I wonder what the cost is compared to, say, Indiana's approach of using chipsealing on everything, even 4-lane roads.  :rolleyes:

Found more on it in this article: https://www.equipmentworld.com/roadbuilding/article/14960081/asphalt-today

And I *HATE* chipsealing, even on local roads.    :banghead:

Mike

ilpt4u

At least we get a lot lesss snow and ice and salted roads in Southern Illinois, so a thinner asphalt layer might work down here, at least some of the time. Wouldn't try it too much in Central nor Northern IL

Rick Powell

Quote from: ilpt4u on June 19, 2024, 07:47:22 PMAt least we get a lot lesss snow and ice and salted roads in Southern Illinois, so a thinner asphalt layer might work down here, at least some of the time. Wouldn't try it too much in Central nor Northern IL
A proprietary chip seal product was used on the section of I-80 between Seneca Exit 105 and Morris Exit 112 when a concrete pavement was prematurely failing. It provided a smooth riding surface and kept the water from infiltrating the pavement and base for several years (about 15, I think) before finally wearing out and being replaced by a conventional SMART type overlay.

Rothman

Quote from: mgk920 on June 19, 2024, 01:14:13 PM
Quote from: jnewkirk77 on June 19, 2024, 12:28:46 PMI noticed several Southern Illinois projects which refer to "Smart Overlay." That's actually an acronym, for "Surface Maintenance At the Right Time." Basically they're putting a thinner asphalt overlay on a road that needs minimal work now, to extend its life. Pretty good idea. I wonder what the cost is compared to, say, Indiana's approach of using chipsealing on everything, even 4-lane roads.  :rolleyes:

Found more on it in this article: https://www.equipmentworld.com/roadbuilding/article/14960081/asphalt-today

And I *HATE* chipsealing, even on local roads.    :banghead:

Mike

Eh, might not be chip sealing if it's a 1" overlay or something...still stupid...like that.

The fact Wyoming uses chip sealing on I-80 should be grounds for FHWA to yank funding from them, whether they use State funds for it or not.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

paulthemapguy

Chip seals are being used as a pavement preservation technique, like how people seal coat their driveways soon after they are repaved. A chip seal or similar seal early in the life of a pavement is an effective way of preventing deformations from penetrating deeply. I've experimented with an early-life pavement preservation technique at work and have participated in meetings learning about the benefits incurred to pavements from early-life applications of chip seals and similar ideas. Other entities have done far more experimentation with pavement preservation techniques, so I mainly just learn from them at these meetings. Pavement preservation techniques that agencies have tested in recent years include microsurfacing, chip seals, BioSeal, and reclamite/maltene rejuvenators.

Microsurfacing has produced mixed results. BioSeal also has produced mixed results. Chip seals and reclamite have proven to be an early application that can usually extend pavement life, in my professional opinion.  The first pavement deformation to occur after a repave is typically the stripping of the top layer of asphalt cement; this breaks the seal that allows moisture and cracking to penetrate deeper down into the pavement. If something can seal in that top layer early on to replace it or insulate it, it can usually prevent larger-scale breakdowns from occurring earlier on. Those early applications of a chip seal or reclamite will be a lot cheaper than having to perform a whole repave. If a cheap application of a chip seal or reclamite can postpone the need for a whole repave by 10, 5, or even 3 years, it can be a wise and cost-effective decision. Yeah, a chip seal makes a road look like an unreliable country road in the middle of nowhere, but it's not like the 6, 12, or 18 inches of asphalt or PCC disappears underneath it when you seal coat over the top of it!
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Rothman

Quote from: paulthemapguy on June 20, 2024, 12:03:06 PMChip seals are being used as a pavement preservation technique, like how people seal coat their driveways soon after they are repaved. A chip seal or similar seal early in the life of a pavement is an effective way of preventing deformations from penetrating deeply. I've experimented with an early-life pavement preservation technique at work and have participated in meetings learning about the benefits incurred to pavements from early-life applications of chip seals and similar ideas. Other entities have done far more experimentation with pavement preservation techniques, so I mainly just learn from them at these meetings. Pavement preservation techniques that agencies have tested in recent years include microsurfacing, chip seals, BioSeal, and reclamite/maltene rejuvenators.

Microsurfacing has produced mixed results. BioSeal also has produced mixed results. Chip seals and reclamite have proven to be an early application that can usually extend pavement life, in my professional opinion.  The first pavement deformation to occur after a repave is typically the stripping of the top layer of asphalt cement; this breaks the seal that allows moisture and cracking to penetrate deeper down into the pavement. If something can seal in that top layer early on to replace it or insulate it, it can usually prevent larger-scale breakdowns from occurring earlier on. Those early applications of a chip seal or reclamite will be a lot cheaper than having to perform a whole repave. If a cheap application of a chip seal or reclamite can postpone the need for a whole repave by 10, 5, or even 3 years, it can be a wise and cost-effective decision. Yeah, a chip seal makes a road look like an unreliable country road in the middle of nowhere, but it's not like the 6, 12, or 18 inches of asphalt or PCC disappears underneath it when you seal coat over the top of it!

All I know is every Wyoming car I saw looked like it had been shot up by a machine gun because of that crap.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

SSOWorld

Quote from: Rothman on June 19, 2024, 10:08:51 PM
Quote from: mgk920 on June 19, 2024, 01:14:13 PM
Quote from: jnewkirk77 on June 19, 2024, 12:28:46 PMI noticed several Southern Illinois projects which refer to "Smart Overlay." That's actually an acronym, for "Surface Maintenance At the Right Time." Basically they're putting a thinner asphalt overlay on a road that needs minimal work now, to extend its life. Pretty good idea. I wonder what the cost is compared to, say, Indiana's approach of using chipsealing on everything, even 4-lane roads.  :rolleyes:

Found more on it in this article: https://www.equipmentworld.com/roadbuilding/article/14960081/asphalt-today

And I *HATE* chipsealing, even on local roads.    :banghead:

Mike

Eh, might not be chip sealing if it's a 1" overlay or something...still stupid...like that.

The fact Wyoming uses chip sealing on I-80 should be grounds for FHWA to yank funding from them, whether they use State funds for it or not.
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edwaleni

Quote from: Rothman on June 20, 2024, 07:27:31 PM
Quote from: paulthemapguy on June 20, 2024, 12:03:06 PMChip seals are being used as a pavement preservation technique, like how people seal coat their driveways soon after they are repaved. A chip seal or similar seal early in the life of a pavement is an effective way of preventing deformations from penetrating deeply. I've experimented with an early-life pavement preservation technique at work and have participated in meetings learning about the benefits incurred to pavements from early-life applications of chip seals and similar ideas. Other entities have done far more experimentation with pavement preservation techniques, so I mainly just learn from them at these meetings. Pavement preservation techniques that agencies have tested in recent years include microsurfacing, chip seals, BioSeal, and reclamite/maltene rejuvenators.

Microsurfacing has produced mixed results. BioSeal also has produced mixed results. Chip seals and reclamite have proven to be an early application that can usually extend pavement life, in my professional opinion.  The first pavement deformation to occur after a repave is typically the stripping of the top layer of asphalt cement; this breaks the seal that allows moisture and cracking to penetrate deeper down into the pavement. If something can seal in that top layer early on to replace it or insulate it, it can usually prevent larger-scale breakdowns from occurring earlier on. Those early applications of a chip seal or reclamite will be a lot cheaper than having to perform a whole repave. If a cheap application of a chip seal or reclamite can postpone the need for a whole repave by 10, 5, or even 3 years, it can be a wise and cost-effective decision. Yeah, a chip seal makes a road look like an unreliable country road in the middle of nowhere, but it's not like the 6, 12, or 18 inches of asphalt or PCC disappears underneath it when you seal coat over the top of it!

All I know is every Wyoming car I saw looked like it had been shot up by a machine gun because of that crap.

Try to ride a motorcycle through that. I did.

edwaleni

One item of note (since the website is multi-modal) is $40 million allocated for the new port at Cairo. That is supposed to include new rail yards, new roads for trucks, etc.  WHile the first attempt failed, perhaps this one will get off the ground after the Cairo Bridge is finished.



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