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TempoNick:
Mile markers start counting from the southern or western terminus of a road. At least when it comes to the interstate markers, a more valuable number would be something telling you how many more miles you have to go to the eastern or northern terminus. Maybe the top can say Mile X and the bottom miles to the other terminus number can show a negative number or an omega symbol or something like that.

When I'm driving, I always like to know how much longer I have until I get to the next state and I can only do that going westbound or southbound.

TempoNick:

--- Quote from: SkyPesos on April 26, 2021, 07:06:22 PM ---Crossposted from the Ranking State Border Crossings thread. Either ODOT made an error below, or Wintersville/Steubenville really is a much larger city than I initially thought.

--- Quote from: SkyPesos on April 26, 2021, 02:28:05 PM ---
--- Quote from: webny99 on April 26, 2021, 01:06:22 PM ---I'm not sure about using volume data to rank the crossings. It makes sense to a certain extent, but then you have cases like NY 303 at the NJ line being almost twice as busy as I-86 at the PA line. Yet no one would argue that NY 303 is the more important crossing.

--- End quote ---
The numbers I got for Ohio are mostly reasonable, so I went with it. Most used crossings at major metro areas like Cincinnati and Toledo. Most interstates are above 4 lane US routes. The only one that's puzzling to me is US 22's 32k AADT at the WV border. US 22 is a freeway at that point, but Steubenville isn't that large of a city, and the 4 lane section dead ends at Cadiz on the Ohio side, though continues all the way as a 4 lane to I-376 on the east. The AADT number would've made more sense to me if it connected to I-70 at Cambridge as a freeway, as that would make a neat Columbus-Pittsburgh freeway corridor, except it doesn't.

2019 AADT of US 22 from Cambridge to WV Border
East of I-77 junction - 5.8k
Concurrency with OH 800 - 2.8k
West of US 250 junctions - 3k
Concurrency with US 250 - 8.5k
East of US 250 junctions - 8.7k
Concurrency with OH 151 - 10.5k
East of OH 151 eastern junction - 11.4k
East of OH 152 junction - 10k
West of OH 43 junction - 10.2k
East of OH 43 junction - 15.8k
West of John Scott Hwy junction - 18k
Between John Scott Hwy and OH 7 - 29k
Concurrency with OH 7 - 33.8k
WV Border - 32k

Actually, a lot of the local roads numbers near Steubenville seem high too, even with 2020 numbers. Especially the 20k on OH 43. Most of the busiest arterials in Cincinnati and Columbus don't even reach that high.


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So roughly 150,000 cars a day cross state borders in that part of the state. That's a lot.

skluth:

--- Quote from: TempoNick on May 24, 2021, 05:09:51 PM ---Mile markers start counting from the southern or western terminus of a road. At least when it comes to the interstate markers, a more valuable number would be something telling you how many more miles you have to go to the eastern or northern terminus. Maybe the top can say Mile X and the bottom miles to the other terminus number can show a negative number or an omega symbol or something like that.

When I'm driving, I always like to know how much longer I have until I get to the next state and I can only do that going westbound or southbound.

--- End quote ---

Your preference is from your personal driving situation. When I lived in St Louis, I did know how many more miles I needed to get home as I crossed Illinois on I-55, I-64, and I-70. Mile markers from the other direction may matter to you but that's more a function of your location than anything. XY coordinates traditionally start in the lower left or southwest corner. Unless you learned to draw coordinates in junior high using graph paper different from the rest of us.

thenetwork:

--- Quote from: TempoNick on May 24, 2021, 05:09:51 PM ---Mile markers start counting from the southern or western terminus of a road. At least when it comes to the interstate markers, a more valuable number would be something telling you how many more miles you have to go to the eastern or northern terminus. Maybe the top can say Mile X and the bottom miles to the other terminus number can show a negative number or an omega symbol or something like that.

--- End quote ---

US-491 in Utah bucks that trend (despite listing it as a N/S route), but at least US-491 in Colorado follows the proper mileage markings.

PurdueBill:

--- Quote from: thenetwork on May 31, 2021, 07:21:11 PM ---US-491 in Utah bucks that trend (despite listing it as a N/S route), but at least US-491 in Colorado follows the proper mileage markings.

--- End quote ---

Is that from its origin as US 666?  Utah did have 491 posted east-west but changed it to north-south like the rest of the route in other states.  The western end became the northern end (so in theory all the mile markers would have to be moved so 0 is at the Colorado line instead of at the US 191 intersection).

In Ohio, I-680 is a notable route that has mileage increasing as you go south; it was done so that Mile 0 was at I-80, its parent.  As you go south away from I-80, the mile markers increase--an exception but reasonable.

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