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Why is US 33 northbound (In Ohio) a 4 lane road

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Bitmapped:

--- Quote from: seicer on May 08, 2021, 08:34:13 PM ---To answer the question as to why US Route 23 has lagged behind: it was four-laned much earlier than most. Portsmouth was a major steel industrial center and a bustling city (not so much for either counts), and Chillicothe was a major paper industrial center. The current four-lane is sufficient for the most part but it's early designs leave much to be desired as traffic counts increase closer to Columbus you get.

--- End quote ---
US 23 south of Columbus is pretty similar to other early 4-lane projects in Ohio, like US 20 west of Norwalk, US 40 west of Columbus, and now-SR 25 near Bowling Green. The main difference is the other routes were functionally replaced by nearby Interstates and US 23 hasn't been. The parts that go through towns could use bypasses, but the rural parts of US 23 work pretty well as-is.

seicer:
I was curious as to when US Route 23 was dualized south of Columbus:

South of Columbus: 1955
Closer to Circleville including the bypass: 1957
South of Circleville: 1956
Closer to Chillicothe: 1957
South of Chillicothe: 1954, 1949
South of Waverly: 1953 (mostly on a c. 1939 alignment)
Atomic Plant bridge: 1953
Closer to Portsmouth: 1953

I wasn't aware that pretty much all of the highway was built at around the same time period. I wonder if it was timed with the construction and opening of the atomic plant (1952-56).

--

Looking at newspaper articles, Ohio voters approved a $500 million bond issue for highway improvements in 1954. One of the priorities included serving the national defense (among other rationales). Much of the US 23 widening projects for 1955 was listed as a high priority. Another article had dedication ceremonies attended by atomic plant officials for the segments in their vicinity.

SkyPesos:
I didn't know US 23 south of Columbus was 4 laned that early. Probably explains why its section in Circleville is lined with businesses even though it "bypasses" the city and has an interchange with US 22. Also for Columbus-Charleston, WV (and points beyond like the Carolinas), an upgraded US 23 between Chillicothe and I-270 would help, along with the last 4 lane segment of US 35 that WV is currently finishing, though it seems like that Google Maps suggest using US 33 over US 23/35, and that it's 3 minutes faster.
South of Chillicothe, I doubt that it'll get upgrade to a full freeway, considering that I-73 in Ohio is pretty much dead now, and US 35 past Chillicothe already makes a good connector to I-77 and the Carolinas.

seicer:
Once the US Route 35 freeway is completed in Ohio, it will be a superior route over US Route 33 which has modern two-lane segments in the vicinity of Athens and Pomeroy (although capable of being expanded to four lanes).

The only plans I know for US Route 23 include the South Bloomfield bypass (access-controlled freeway) to the east. I was looking through ODOT's site for planning projects and found none.

GCrites80s:

--- Quote from: seicer on May 09, 2021, 05:40:24 PM ---I was curious as to when US Route 23 was dualized south of Columbus:

South of Columbus: 1955
Closer to Circleville including the bypass: 1957
South of Circleville: 1956
Closer to Chillicothe: 1957
South of Chillicothe: 1954, 1949
South of Waverly: 1953 (mostly on a c. 1939 alignment)
Atomic Plant bridge: 1953
Closer to Portsmouth: 1953

I wasn't aware that pretty much all of the highway was built at around the same time period. I wonder if it was timed with the construction and opening of the atomic plant (1952-56).

--

Looking at newspaper articles, Ohio voters approved a $500 million bond issue for highway improvements in 1954. One of the priorities included serving the national defense (among other rationales). Much of the US 23 widening projects for 1955 was listed as a high priority. Another article had dedication ceremonies attended by atomic plant officials for the segments in their vicinity.

--- End quote ---

Yeah all of it starting at where 270 is now on the South Side of Columbus was pretty much done at once except for the Chillicothe bypass ('60, '70s?). No major changes either except some widening in Waverly around Y2K and a very minor widening on the north side of Portsmouth (in front of the Stag Bar) around the same time. It was weird to me when I asked my dad about it and he was like "All at once. Started on it in '53. Done in 1955." He didn't go to Portsmouth much though. Even up until the '80s people we lumping Portsmouth into Columbus like it was almost part of the metro; it was weird. I guess because it wasn't a full on hellscape until then and Columbus wasn't nearly as nice yet? lol

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