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Author Topic: Bikes on I-76?  (Read 2517 times)

seicer

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2021, 11:24:14 AM »

Depends. There are expressways and freeways in the east where bicycles are allowed, too. Practically every ADHS corridor route in West Virginia is signed for cyclists. I know I've seen quite a few along portions of I-70 in Maryland where there is no alternative because of how it disconnected US 40 near Hancock.

US 89

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2021, 11:34:13 AM »

It's much more a function of whether there's a viable frontage road or nearby alternate available. At least on that part of I-25, the no-bikes sign goes up as soon as the paved frontage road reappears.

That would make sense... but as you probably know, there are plenty of rural freeways in Utah that are bike-legal but definitely have viable frontage roads or alternates. The portions of I-15 south of exit 4 and between 10-16 in St George, as well as between Summit and Paragonah, would fall into that category with various urban streets or old US 91 as good alternates that are about the same distance. No idea why you'd need to have a bike-legal I-70 in the Sevier Valley either with old US 89 still intact.

There are also a few urban freeways and expressways in Utah that do not disallow bicycles. SR 201 is one of those; despite it being legal, I would never ride a bicycle on that east of Magna. The shoulder is narrow enough that going around any cars stopped in it requires entering the main lanes, and there are plenty of good surface alternates that are slower and honestly more fun to bike anyway.

In addition, most of the newer freeways and expressways are technically bike-legal, even though many have a parallel full scale multi-use trail next to them. Legacy Parkway/SR 67 and Mountain View/SR 85 both fall into that category.

Mr. Matté

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2021, 11:46:23 AM »

Driving back across I-76 on Friday, I saw a sign that indicated bikes could be on I-76.  They had to be kept all the way to the right on the shoulder.  Did I see that correctly?

Some western Interstates allow bikes on the shoulder. I wouldn't be surprised if the western I-76 allowed it, but definitely not the eastern I-76. (I don't know which one you're referring to.)



(OK, this was eastern I-76)
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SectorZ

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2021, 01:10:37 PM »

There has to be a dividing line between where bikes are allowed on freeways vs. where they are forbidden. Perhaps, I'm guessing that TX, OK, KS, NE and the two Dakotas are the furthest east where you could take your bike onto the freeway, am I right?

At least in New England, the only things you could cycle on that would remotely resemble a freeway are "Super-2" freeways (and really only in NH) or any Jersey Freeway that has business and occasional homes on it (US 1, MA 9, MA 146 in Millbury for Massachusetts examples).
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Kniwt

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2021, 02:13:45 PM »


That would make sense... but as you probably know, there are plenty of rural freeways in Utah that are bike-legal but definitely have viable frontage roads or alternates. The portions of I-15 south of exit 4 and between 10-16 in St George, as well as between Summit and Paragonah, would fall into that category with various urban streets or old US 91 as good alternates that are about the same distance.

UDOT has updated its bike rules for southern I-15; now prohibited between exits 2-16, with Bikes Must Exit signage at each end. But plenty of surface streets through there, of course.
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US 89

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #30 on: August 03, 2021, 04:24:10 PM »

That would make sense... but as you probably know, there are plenty of rural freeways in Utah that are bike-legal but definitely have viable frontage roads or alternates. The portions of I-15 south of exit 4 and between 10-16 in St George, as well as between Summit and Paragonah, would fall into that category with various urban streets or old US 91 as good alternates that are about the same distance.

UDOT has updated its bike rules for southern I-15; now prohibited between exits 2-16, with Bikes Must Exit signage at each end. But plenty of surface streets through there, of course.

That makes sense for sure especially with how big St George is now. Every time I go down there it amazes me how much bigger it is than the last time.

Are these updated rules available online anywhere? The only UDOT map I could find has not been updated.

Bruce

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #31 on: August 03, 2021, 05:48:11 PM »

I don't think bicycles should be allowed on Interstate Highways. I would never ride a bicycle on an Interstate Highway, that is unless I had a death wish.

They should only be banned if a suitable and practical bike-only facility is close and parallel. So unless the USBR program gets billions in funding, this is the only option.

mgk920

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #32 on: August 03, 2021, 10:54:25 PM »

I don't think bicycles should be allowed on Interstate Highways. I would never ride a bicycle on an Interstate Highway, that is unless I had a death wish.

They should only be banned if a suitable and practical bike-only facility is close and parallel. So unless the USBR program gets billions in funding, this is the only option.

I'm actually a bit surprised that there is not a 'USBR' planned in the I-70 corridor west of Denver.  It has lots of established paralleling pathways and is seriously scenic.

Mike
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Concrete Bob

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #33 on: August 03, 2021, 11:41:58 PM »

Allowing bicycles on any freeways in highly urbanized areas is not a very good idea for either motorists or bicyclists.  There are plenty of parallel adjacent streets in urban areas for bicyclists.  As long as there are adequate-width right shoulders on rural freeways, I see no problems with motorists and bicyclists sharing the pavement.  Of course, the rural freeways should be properly signed to lead bicyclists off the freeway at off ramps, and back on to the freeway at corresponding on ramps.  In instances where two freeways meet in a rural area, perhaps appropriate paths could be built outside the footprint of the interchange.   
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Kniwt

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #34 on: August 04, 2021, 03:51:59 AM »

That would make sense... but as you probably know, there are plenty of rural freeways in Utah that are bike-legal but definitely have viable frontage roads or alternates. The portions of I-15 south of exit 4 and between 10-16 in St George, as well as between Summit and Paragonah, would fall into that category with various urban streets or old US 91 as good alternates that are about the same distance.

UDOT has updated its bike rules for southern I-15; now prohibited between exits 2-16, with Bikes Must Exit signage at each end. But plenty of surface streets through there, of course.

That makes sense for sure especially with how big St George is now. Every time I go down there it amazes me how much bigger it is than the last time.

Are these updated rules available online anywhere? The only UDOT map I could find has not been updated.

That online map is definitely quite old and hasn't been updated in years.

North of Exit 16, the gravel section of Old 91 to Harrisburg and Leeds was finally (re-?)paved with chip-seal last year, so it's a decent way to stay off I-15 all the way to Exit 27 ... although the southbound hill has sections of 13% grade.

The growth in metro StG has reignited big-time with a combination of Covid and politics (neither of which we'll get into here in this thread!). UT 7 is now lined with new housing developments at Exits 1, 3, 6, and 10, and thousands more homes are starting to be built way out at Exit 15. Traffic counts are still relatively low, but I'm sure UDOT is starting to think about the day UT 7 will need to be four-laned east of Exit 6.
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kphoger

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #35 on: August 04, 2021, 09:50:12 AM »

Of course, the rural freeways should be properly signed to lead bicyclists off the freeway at off ramps, and back on to the freeway at corresponding on ramps.  In instances where two freeways meet in a rural area, perhaps appropriate paths could be built outside the footprint of the interchange.   

Yes, it could be a little dicey if you encounter a cloverleaf or cloverstack, I suppose.
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Kniwt

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #36 on: August 04, 2021, 11:21:41 AM »

Of course, the rural freeways should be properly signed to lead bicyclists off the freeway at off ramps, and back on to the freeway at corresponding on ramps.     

Most cyclists who are experienced and confident enough to ride on freeways just cross the off/on ramps perpendicular to traffic when it's safe to do so. In fact, British Columbia signs some of its freeways exactly this way. Here's an example on BC 17 just outside Victoria:

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Mr. Matté

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #37 on: August 04, 2021, 12:22:24 PM »

Of course, the rural freeways should be properly signed to lead bicyclists off the freeway at off ramps, and back on to the freeway at corresponding on ramps.     

Most cyclists who are experienced and confident enough to ride on freeways just cross the off/on ramps perpendicular to traffic when it's safe to do so.

Also cyclists if required to use offramps, say at diamond interchanges, would not be too happy about the extra hill climbing having to be done if the ramp rises in elevation to meet the minor road's overpass. I would use the BC method most of the time unless exiting traffic is really heavy.
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SectorZ

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #38 on: August 04, 2021, 04:47:58 PM »

Of course, the rural freeways should be properly signed to lead bicyclists off the freeway at off ramps, and back on to the freeway at corresponding on ramps.     

Most cyclists who are experienced and confident enough to ride on freeways just cross the off/on ramps perpendicular to traffic when it's safe to do so.

Also cyclists if required to use offramps, say at diamond interchanges, would not be too happy about the extra hill climbing having to be done if the ramp rises in elevation to meet the minor road's overpass. I would use the BC method most of the time unless exiting traffic is really heavy.

Outside of Florida, I think that topography change is the least of a cyclist's climbing problems  :-D

I love that BC signage. Though I've never taken a ride on an interstate (or interstate-style Canadian freeways) I have gone on things like super-2 freeways, and the off ramps present the biggest danger. That's good instruction that minimizes incursions. I've typically done the same approaching them unless I can see so far back that there is no traffic to compete with me. That whole not violating Newton's law of physics and such.
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Breadman17

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #39 on: September 03, 2021, 10:07:01 AM »

There has to be a dividing line between where bikes are allowed on freeways vs. where they are forbidden. Perhaps, I'm guessing that TX, OK, KS, NE and the two Dakotas are the furthest east where you could take your bike onto the freeway, am I right?

Nah. I-79 in Pittsburgh allows them in some sections. Thats probably the furthest east you’ll find an Interstate that allows bikes
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DenverBrian

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Re: Bikes on I-76?
« Reply #40 on: September 14, 2021, 09:49:48 AM »

There has to be a dividing line between where bikes are allowed on freeways vs. where they are forbidden. Perhaps, I'm guessing that TX, OK, KS, NE and the two Dakotas are the furthest east where you could take your bike onto the freeway, am I right?
I'm sure it's a combination of alternative access, traffic counts on the rural interstate, shoulder width and condition, and requests from cyclists in the area. Given all that, I could easily see bikes allowed on the shoulder of rural interstates in MN, WI, MI, ME, NH, VT...
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