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Quebec's Highways

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agentsteel53:

--- Quote from: J N Winkler on February 24, 2010, 01:21:38 PM ---Not even "St James St/Rue St-Jacques" on an autoroute guide sign?

--- End quote ---

I do not recall that one.  Now that I think about it, there were a few autoroute guide signs that were bilingual.  I will have to look through my photos.

Alps:
The Autoroute bilingual signs are mostly around Montreal because that's as far north as US tourists tend to venture.

SP Cook:

--- Quote from: J N Winkler on February 24, 2010, 11:36:48 AM ---There is also an insistence on translating business names into French which results in, e.g., KFC becoming PFK (KFC trades as KFC in France, if memory serves). 
--- End quote ---

This is, indeed, unique in the world.  KFC is KFC everywhere in the world, regardless of what "Kentucky Fried Chicken" might letter out to in the local language, even in places that do not use Latin letters (it will translate or transliterate Kentucky Fried Chicken into the local language).  It is KFC in France and in Canada's only bilingual provence (New Brunswick). 

Except in Quebec.  As I understand it, Quebec has this law called "Bill 101" which provides, among other things, that all commercial signage must have French "markedly prominent" compared to any other language.  A name, however, does not have to be translated, even if it could be (if your name is James you do not become Jacques when you cross the border), so "McDonald's" is "McDonald's", "Wal-Mart" is "Wal-Mart" and "Tim Horton" is "Tim Horton".  But in the case of KFC, it was ruled that "Kentucky" was the brand name and "Fried Chicken" was the product so they had to translate, and they chose to keep the French initials when they went to this strategy of using the initials.

BTW, in Canada, and in every other country of the world except the USA, KFC has regular French Fries, rather than the (awful, IMHO) potato logs served here.



oscar:

--- Quote from: SP Cook on February 25, 2010, 07:33:26 AM ---
--- Quote from: J N Winkler on February 24, 2010, 11:36:48 AM ---There is also an insistence on translating business names into French which results in, e.g., KFC becoming PFK (KFC trades as KFC in France, if memory serves). 
--- End quote ---

This is, indeed, unique in the world.  KFC is KFC everywhere in the world, regardless of what "Kentucky Fried Chicken" might letter out to in the local language, even in places that do not use Latin letters (it will translate or transliterate Kentucky Fried Chicken into the local language).  It is KFC in France and in Canada's only bilingual provence (New Brunswick). 

Except in Quebec.  As I understand it, Quebec has this law called "Bill 101" which provides, among other things, that all commercial signage must have French "markedly prominent" compared to any other language.  A name, however, does not have to be translated, even if it could be (if your name is James you do not become Jacques when you cross the border), so "McDonald's" is "McDonald's", "Wal-Mart" is "Wal-Mart" and "Tim Horton" is "Tim Horton".  But in the case of KFC, it was ruled that "Kentucky" was the brand name and "Fried Chicken" was the product so they had to translate, and they chose to keep the French initials when they went to this strategy of using the initials.
--- End quote ---
When I drove through southern Ontario a few weekends ago, I recall seeing at least one PFK.  That part of the province is pretty far from Quebec, and not particularly strong on bilingual signage.

Hellfighter:
What is the timetable for the western portion of A-50 between Grenville and Route 317?

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