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US 400

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Chris:
US 400 runs east-west from Granada, CO to Joplin, MO so mostly in Kansas. It was once set up as a temporary US Highway, awaiting the I-66 construction. I-66 construction was cancelled west of Wichita, but I doubt if it will be constructed east of Wichita soon.

Should we sack US 400? It's an auxiliary route of US 0, which doesn't exist, and US 400 is already multiplexed for most of it's route, especially US 50 and US 54. Maybe they should just replaced them with a State Route number in places where US 400 doesn't run concurrent with other US Highways.

xonhulu:
It should go, not just because its number makes no sense, but because the route isn't needed.

Revive 755:
Maybe decommission it west of Wichita and renumber the somewhat improved Wichita-Joplin part as a new US 466 or US 354.  In any case, I think the route should replace the existing US 160 between US 69 and Springfield, MO, with US 160 rerouted across MO 96 and MO 266.

J N Winkler:

--- Quote from: Chris on July 25, 2009, 09:43:47 AM ---US 400 runs east-west from Granada, CO to Joplin, MO so mostly in Kansas. It was once set up as a temporary US Highway, awaiting the I-66 construction. I-66 construction was cancelled west of Wichita, but I doubt if it will be constructed east of Wichita soon.
--- End quote ---

Perhaps not, but west of Wichita substantial lengths of US 50 and US 54 are being widened to four-lane divided with a full freeway as the ultimate configuration where this is not being built outright.  US 50 west of Garden City is being widened to four-lane divided with flat intersections, and US 54 west of Kingman will be a freeway right out of the box.


--- Quote ---Should we sack US 400? It's an auxiliary route of US 0, which doesn't exist, and US 400 is already multiplexed for most of it's route, especially US 50 and US 54.
--- End quote ---

Several problems with this statement:

*  US 400 has substantial lengths which are US 400 only--including former K-154 near Mullinville and much of the route east of the US 54 split in Augusta (former K-96--see my avatar).

*  "US 400" does not mean fourth branch of US 0:  it belongs to a different numbering convention.  Routes like US 400, US 412, US 425, etc. are effectively two-digit US routes.  The numbers are made by adding integer multiples of 12.5 to 400 and then rounding down to eliminate fractions.  These numbers can be assigned anywhere in the country and therefore eliminate the need to search for plausible branches of a two-digit route in the relevant geographical area.


--- Quote ---Maybe they should just replaced them with a State Route number in places where US 400 doesn't run concurrent with other US Highways.
--- End quote ---

It could equally well be argued that the better thing would have been not to create US 400 (and, for that matter, US 412) in the first place.  I do not agree, however, that this would have been the correct way to proceed.  The US 400 designation has value since it puts the long-planned southern Kansas freeway corridor under a single number, rather than three:  K-96 (southeast of Wichita), US 54 (Wichita to Mullinville), and US 50 (Dodge City westwards), with other state highways acting as brief connectors (e.g. former K-154, which itself was once US 154).

Keep in mind also that, unlike state routes in many states, US routes have to be continuous from terminus to terminus in order to retain navigational value.  Generally speaking, state DOTs are more reluctant to play continuity games with US routes because they have AASHTO looking over their shoulders.  The few exceptions, like US 85 in New Mexico, prove the rule--AASHTO considers US 85 to exist in New Mexico, but NMDOT does not sign it at all, and NMDOT gets away with it because the entire US 85 corridor in the state is served by I-25 and it is plausible to expect motorists to base their navigational decisions on the route of higher class.

xonhulu:

--- Quote from: J N Winkler on July 25, 2009, 02:52:30 PM ---*  US 400 has substantial lengths which are US 400 only--including former K-154 near Mullinville and much of the route east of the US 54 split in Augusta (former K-96--see my avatar).
--- End quote ---

This is what would make removing US 400 problematic.


--- Quote ---*  "US 400" does not mean fourth branch of US 0:  it belongs to a different numbering convention.  Routes like US 400, US 412, US 425, etc. are effectively two-digit US routes.  The numbers are made by adding integer multiples of 12.5 to 400 and then rounding down to eliminate fractions.  These numbers can be assigned anywhere in the country and therefore eliminate the need to search for plausible branches of a two-digit route in the relevant geographical area.
--- End quote ---

I have never seen anything indicating there is any official policy by AASHTO like this for any "400-series" routes.  For one thing, nobody would devise such a strange numbering convention (the rounded-off 12.5 increment).  For another, US 412 pre-dates the other two (400, 425); why would they start in the middle?  Lastly, I remember someone's posting on another board where they shared that they had asked KDOT why the number 400 was picked, and got the answer, "It was available."  Anyway, if the 400 series routes were meant to act as 2-dus, why weren't they just given 2 digit designations?  There are numbers available.  I'd agree that 400 and 412 are long enough, but I'd disagree on 425.


--- Quote ---It could equally well be argued that the better thing would have been not to create US 400 (and, for that matter, US 412) in the first place.  I do not agree, however, that this would have been the correct way to proceed.  The US 400 designation has value since it puts the long-planned southern Kansas freeway corridor under a single number, rather than three:  K-96 (southeast of Wichita), US 54 (Wichita to Mullinville), and US 50 (Dodge City westwards), with other state highways acting as brief connectors (e.g. former K-154, which itself was once US 154).
--- End quote ---

This makes some sense, although the same thing could've been done with a state route designation, since US 400 barely leaves Kansas (note Colorado's nearly complete lack of enthusiasm it).

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