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Rural gas in Canada

Started by Alps, February 14, 2023, 10:19:22 PM

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Alps

I'm planning a loop relative to the Grand Forks meet and discovered that there is no gas on SK 18 west of Estevan. At all. For over 300 miles.


Except card lock.


Is it remotely plausible that people must have card lock to get gas? If I am clinching SK 18, will any of these stations have someone around during the day to help if I need gas? This seems an absurdly long distance through many towns without a hint of available gas. If someone more experienced in the matter could elaborate, much appreciated.


triplemultiplex

"That's just like... your opinion, man."

oscar

^^ Some Canadian cardlocks accept credit cards, even U.S.-issued cards. For example, one in Lynn Lake MB (about 300 km on MB 391 from Thompson, though gas is also available in Leaf Rapids -- I couldn't use that Co-op cardlock machine by myself, but the Co-op store across the street was able to help me).

In Yukon, there was a cardlock that didn't take credit cards. Fortunately, the guy behind me in line for the pump had the necessary card. I gave him a C$50 bill, for him to pump that much gas into my truck. (Not the only situation in rural Canada where Canadian cash came in handy.)

Expect cardlock pumps to be unattended, but Co-op pumps sometimes have someone available to assist, like the one in Leaf Rapids MB. Co-op seems to have pumps and a C-store in Coronach, though that is a long hike west from Estevan. And yes, Co-op will cheerfully sell stuff to non-members.
my Hot Springs and Highways pages, with links to my roads sites:
http://www.alaskaroads.com/home.html

Mapmikey

Quote from: Alps on February 14, 2023, 10:19:22 PM
I'm planning a loop relative to the Grand Forks meet and discovered that there is no gas on SK 18 west of Estevan. At all. For over 300 miles.


Except card lock.


Is it remotely plausible that people must have card lock to get gas? If I am clinching SK 18, will any of these stations have someone around during the day to help if I need gas? This seems an absurdly long distance through many towns without a hint of available gas. If someone more experienced in the matter could elaborate, much appreciated.

Google Willow Bunch Esso. On SK 36, 15 min north of SK 18. About 150 miles from Estevan. 

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: triplemultiplex on February 15, 2023, 11:30:41 AM
Bust out the jerrycans!

Back when I had a truck and occasionally did some OHV runs a couple full jerrycans were an essential.  There was an adage about making sure to carry at least one or two if wherever you were going was 150 miles from a reliable gas station. 

oscar

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on February 15, 2023, 01:12:20 PM
Back when I had a truck and occasionally did some OHV runs a couple full jerrycans were an essential.  There was an adage about making sure to carry at least one or two if wherever you were going was 150 miles from a reliable gas station. 

That really depends on having a well-ventilated place to put the cans. When I used them (not often), I put them in the bed of my pickup truck, then opened the vent windows of my camper shell.
my Hot Springs and Highways pages, with links to my roads sites:
http://www.alaskaroads.com/home.html

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: oscar on February 15, 2023, 01:43:47 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on February 15, 2023, 01:12:20 PM
Back when I had a truck and occasionally did some OHV runs a couple full jerrycans were an essential.  There was an adage about making sure to carry at least one or two if wherever you were going was 150 miles from a reliable gas station. 

That really depends on having a well-ventilated place to put the cans. When I used them (not often), I put them in the bed of my pickup truck, then opened the vent windows of my camper shell.

Which in my case I never had a camper shell.  Worked out for me since my truck (a 1997 CK Silverado) had an extended cab with a rear bench that I slept on in a sleeping bag.  Not having to unload often or set up a tent definitely was something that saved a bunch of time.

Alps

Quote from: Mapmikey on February 15, 2023, 12:48:03 PM
Quote from: Alps on February 14, 2023, 10:19:22 PM
I'm planning a loop relative to the Grand Forks meet and discovered that there is no gas on SK 18 west of Estevan. At all. For over 300 miles.


Except card lock.


Is it remotely plausible that people must have card lock to get gas? If I am clinching SK 18, will any of these stations have someone around during the day to help if I need gas? This seems an absurdly long distance through many towns without a hint of available gas. If someone more experienced in the matter could elaborate, much appreciated.

Google Willow Bunch Esso. On SK 36, 15 min north of SK 18. About 150 miles from Estevan. 
I've noted a couple off my route but hoping to avoid detours like that. See what mileage my car gets. Thanks for the advice!

dmuzika

Just curious as to why SK 18? Most of it is thin membrane surface (especially west of SK 35) and I understand some sections are allowed to revert back to gravel. In other jurisdictions it would probably be a secondary highway.

The Official Saskatchewan Road Map shows thin membrane surface highways; https://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/about-saskatchewan/travel-guides-and-maps.

Rothman

Quote from: dmuzika on February 16, 2023, 02:13:31 AM
Just curious as to why SK 18? Most of it is thin membrane surface (especially west of SK 35) and I understand some sections are allowed to revert back to gravel. In other jurisdictions it would probably be a secondary highway.

The Official Saskatchewan Road Map shows thin membrane surface highways; https://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/about-saskatchewan/travel-guides-and-maps.
Would you say that it would be insane to drive on the membrane?  Insane in the brain?
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Alps


froggie

"Thin membrane" to me sounds almost like bituminous...

Alps

Quote from: froggie on February 17, 2023, 12:04:27 AM
"Thin membrane" to me sounds almost like bituminous...
It looked like chipseal when I looked it up.

texaskdog

Any Corner Gas fans out there?

froggie

Quote from: Alps on February 17, 2023, 12:58:06 AM
Quote from: froggie on February 17, 2023, 12:04:27 AM
"Thin membrane" to me sounds almost like bituminous...
It looked like chipseal when I looked it up.

Chipseal is often done on top of bituminous in the Upper Midwest.

webfil

#15
Cardlock is ubiquitous in rural Canada, especially in the Prairies. I understand that for New Jersey fellows used to full service gas stations, it can be a non-sense 😜

Co-op cardlock stations ensure fuel availability to residents, farmers and businesses via a non-profit network of distributors. But getting a co-op account is quite the hassle for the non-resident, as it requires to fill an application and allow the co-op to inquire your credit status.

I'm not personnaly fond of the "members only" system. While co-op cardlocks can be found sparsely in Qu├ębec on the Sonic network, I've seen many off-brand cardlocks that work with the usual credit or debit card, especially in the eastern parts where tourism is abundant but workforce is not. Here's one in La Martre, off R-132 : https://imgur.com/6X27PVG

dmuzika

 
Quote from: texaskdog on February 17, 2023, 01:31:45 AM
Any Corner Gas fans out there?

I've recently gotten into it.  :popcorn:

dmuzika

Quote from: Rothman on February 16, 2023, 06:49:50 AM
Quote from: dmuzika on February 16, 2023, 02:13:31 AM
Just curious as to why SK 18? Most of it is thin membrane surface (especially west of SK 35) and I understand some sections are allowed to revert back to gravel. In other jurisdictions it would probably be a secondary highway.

The Official Saskatchewan Road Map shows thin membrane surface highways; https://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/about-saskatchewan/travel-guides-and-maps.
Would you say that it would be insane to drive on the membrane?  Insane in the brain?

Some of the more out of the way Saskatchewan highways have an infamous reputation for not being in good shape; the "thin membrane" sections are more likely to live up to that reputation. Saying that, I haven't traveled on SK 18 so it might be fine.

kphoger

Quote from: dmuzika on February 16, 2023, 02:13:31 AM
Just curious as to why SK 18? Most of it is thin membrane surface (especially west of SK 35) and I understand some sections are allowed to revert back to gravel. In other jurisdictions it would probably be a secondary highway.

The Official Saskatchewan Road Map shows thin membrane surface highways; https://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/about-saskatchewan/travel-guides-and-maps.

I prefer to think of it as "New Mexico style" pavement.

https://goo.gl/maps/zaRXxp5R7tWq53dm9
https://goo.gl/maps/wL9AE2ZgB9JhRjiH6
https://goo.gl/maps/rSjeBG7HrBzHeSES8

Also reminds me of Missouri's lettered highways.
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.
Visit scenic Orleans County, NY!
Male pronouns, please.

Quote from: Philip K. DickIf you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.

texaskdog

Quote from: dmuzika on February 17, 2023, 10:11:02 PM
Quote from: texaskdog on February 17, 2023, 01:31:45 AM
Any Corner Gas fans out there?

I've recently gotten into it.  :popcorn:

He's not "the" Taxman he's "A" Taxman!

Mapmikey

#20
Quote from: texaskdog on February 19, 2023, 08:45:11 AM
Quote from: dmuzika on February 17, 2023, 10:11:02 PM
Quote from: texaskdog on February 17, 2023, 01:31:45 AM
Any Corner Gas fans out there?



I've recently gotten into it.  :popcorn:

He's not "the" Taxman he's "A" Taxman!

I visited the Ruby/Corner Gas set in Rouleau right after they filmed the Corner Gas movie.  Now most of the locations have burned down or been torn down.

"What do you mean there's nothing to see...?  There's nothing to block your view..."

CapeCodder

Quote from: kphoger on February 17, 2023, 10:23:36 PM
Quote from: dmuzika on February 16, 2023, 02:13:31 AM
Just curious as to why SK 18? Most of it is thin membrane surface (especially west of SK 35) and I understand some sections are allowed to revert back to gravel. In other jurisdictions it would probably be a secondary highway.

The Official Saskatchewan Road Map shows thin membrane surface highways; https://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/about-saskatchewan/travel-guides-and-maps.

I prefer to think of it as "New Mexico style" pavement.

https://goo.gl/maps/zaRXxp5R7tWq53dm9
https://goo.gl/maps/wL9AE2ZgB9JhRjiH6
https://goo.gl/maps/rSjeBG7HrBzHeSES8

Also reminds me of Missouri's lettered highways.

Any of the floodplain roads, really

Road Hog

#22
Quote from: kphoger on February 17, 2023, 10:23:36 PM
Quote from: dmuzika on February 16, 2023, 02:13:31 AM
Just curious as to why SK 18? Most of it is thin membrane surface (especially west of SK 35) and I understand some sections are allowed to revert back to gravel. In other jurisdictions it would probably be a secondary highway.

The Official Saskatchewan Road Map shows thin membrane surface highways; https://www.tourismsaskatchewan.com/about-saskatchewan/travel-guides-and-maps.

I prefer to think of it as "New Mexico style" pavement.

https://goo.gl/maps/zaRXxp5R7tWq53dm9
https://goo.gl/maps/wL9AE2ZgB9JhRjiH6
https://goo.gl/maps/rSjeBG7HrBzHeSES8

Also reminds me of Missouri's lettered highways.

Quote from: froggie on February 17, 2023, 07:49:21 AM
Quote from: Alps on February 17, 2023, 12:58:06 AM
Quote from: froggie on February 17, 2023, 12:04:27 AM
"Thin membrane" to me sounds almost like bituminous...
It looked like chipseal when I looked it up.

Chipseal is often done on top of bituminous in the Upper Midwest.

"Thin membrane" sounds like the linguistic gymnast sticking a 10. Nice spin.

Texas uses it all the time and even will do interstate highways in it, or did until recently. It's very common in Arkansas too.

Side highways can take their chip-seal and like it. But on more major highways, both states will do a proper asphalt resurfacing every 10-12 years or so, but they will follow at the 6-year midpoint with a chip-seal layer on top to "extend the life" of the asphalt beneath.

OK. But wouldn't the asphalt endure just as long without it?

EDIT: I'm done with the Canada thread for now. Saw two topics that interested me and I bit like a salmon.



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