Regional Boards > Canada

1970's Newfoundland Highway renumbering

<< < (2/5) > >>

oscar:

--- Quote from: Steve on July 28, 2013, 07:50:43 PM ---
I don't think it's that old. I could believe these date to the renumbering. I highly doubt there are any remaining traces pre-renumbering.

--- End quote ---

So do I.  But it might've been the first style used post-renumbering, with the one cited by ghYHZ being the second.  Certainly the examples of the latter I've seen (on two trips, in 2003 and 2011) are in much better shape than those of the former. 

Alps:

--- Quote from: oscar on July 28, 2013, 08:36:44 PM ---
--- Quote from: Steve on July 28, 2013, 07:50:43 PM ---I don't think it's that old. I could believe these date to the renumbering. I highly doubt there are any remaining traces pre-renumbering.

--- End quote ---

So do I.  But it might've been the first style used post-renumbering, with the one cited by ghYHZ being the second.  Certainly the examples of the latter I've seen (on two trips, in 2003 and 2011) are in much better shape than those of the former. 

--- End quote ---
Agreed. I would imagine the trapezoid has some precedent, but it could have been black on white, for example.

Road Hog:

--- Quote from: ghYHZ on July 28, 2013, 08:51:15 AM ---
--- Quote from: ghYHZ on July 27, 2013, 08:46:49 PM ---Here’s a map from the early ‘50s just after Newfoundland joined Canada. Prior to 1949, it was a separate country. There were gaps in the trans island highway then and cars were carried across the gaps on railway flat cars. The Trans Canada wasn't completed until the mid ‘60s.

--- End quote ---

There were no car ferries between Nova Scotia and Port-aux-Basques, Newfoundland until the late 1950s. Until then, passenger and cargo boats connected with the narrow-gauge railway at Port-aux-Basques for the run across the island to St. John’s……the “Newfie Bullet”…… 550 miles in 24 hours. Prior to 1949.....you would also be required to go through Newfoundland Customs and Immigration on the dock as you were entering from another country......Canada.

--- End quote ---

Technically, Newfoundland was never independent. It was a dominion of Great Britain from 1907 until it voted to join Canada. Its flag was the Union Jack, and remained so for a period of time as a province. However, Newfoundland did enjoy a certain degree of autonomy.

ghYHZ:
Newfoundland was a self-governing British Colony beginning in the mid 1800s. By the 1930’s it was heavily in debt and along with political scandal, government was relinquish to London and replaced by a Commission along with a Governor. It remained as such until Confederation in 1949.

The Provincial Flag today is reminiscent of the Union Jack.

http://www.gov.nl.ca/aboutnl/flag.html

Newfoundland also includes mainland Labrador and the boundary between Labrador and Canada was in dispute until 1927 when it was decided in Newfoundland’s favor against Canada. Quebec which borders Labrador still does not recognize this boundary and even to this day, if you look at an Official Quebec Map…..you will see it indicated that the boundary is disputed and actually shows what Quebec considers the border.

http://www.quebec511.gouv.qc.ca/en/carte_routiere/duplessis.htm

webfil:

--- Quote from: ghYHZ on July 29, 2013, 06:47:50 AM ---Newfoundland also includes mainland Labrador and the boundary between Labrador and Canada was in dispute until 1927 when it was decided in Newfoundland’s favor against Canada. Quebec which borders Labrador still does not recognize this boundary and even to this day, if you look at an Official Quebec Map…..you will see it indicated that the boundary is disputed and actually shows what Quebec considers the border.

http://www.quebec511.gouv.qc.ca/en/carte_routiere/duplessis.htm
--- End quote ---

The famous "dinner's-ready!--coming,-just-finished-drawing-my-map" border.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version