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 1 
 on: Today at 12:17:16 PM 
Started by cpzilliacus - Last post by abefroman329
A strange detail I noticed in the reports (it didn't take very long for me, heh) - group was heading to Ommegang brewery.
Which is quite a bit further west along either I-88 or NY-7 (they run pretty much in parallel).
However, there is no good reason to continue straight along NY-30 into the stretch where crash occurred. Driver should have turned right on a previous intersection at stop sign. Assuming they were coming from Amsterdam along NY-30, there is no TO I-88 shield on that arm of the intersection - but there is one on NY-7 just past the intersection, visible from the stop line on NY-30.
As someone who's driven between Amsterdam and Cooperstown a few times, I would further suggest that the best route is NY 30 -> US 20 -> NY 80, avoiding that area and I-88 altogether.  I have wondered if the group asked for an intermediate stop in Schoharie or something that caused this routing to be chosen.

They certainly couldn't have been headed directly from Amsterdam to that brewery, or they would likely never come near - and certainly not south of - I-88. Unless the driver missed the turn for NY 7, which isn't an outrageous possibility.
Anyone who assumes a limo or bus driver would take the most logical route hasn't spent much time riding in limos or buses.

I am not sure what is the most logical route for a vehicle as strange as a stretched limo. I did drive  in the area a few times, including Ommegang and entire Cooperstown beverage trail - and I had a few moments when I (in a pretty standard sedan) was thinking if I am actually going to make it on that road, or it is designed for 4x4 only.  I can see some logic in taking a detour to maximize interstate mileage and reduce local roads.
Difference between Google maps optimal routing (I-90 to NY-166)  and I-88 routing is 8 miles and 7 minutes; routing @Jim suggested is actually another 3 minutes slower.  And while US-20 is a nice drive, those NY routes through the hills are often less than great.
What I'm saying is that I've been on enough party buses that have gotten hopelessly lost that assuming the driver knows where they're going or how to get there in a hatchback, let alone a large vehicle that may not be able to travel on all roads in the area, is a fool's errand.

 2 
 on: Today at 12:16:33 PM 
Started by Scott5114 - Last post by oscar
Nabb => Bear (DE), photo previously played for Glasgow:


 3 
 on: Today at 12:14:06 PM 
Started by Roadwarriors79 - Last post by abefroman329
I just noticed ISTHA has been installing credit card readers in the cash lanes at toll plazas, so I assume they won’t be going to all-ETC any time soon.

Wow! You almost never see a credit card option at toll booths. The only toll roads I've known to accept credit cards are the Kansas Turnpike and the Indiana Toll Road.
The Dulles Greenway has had them, if not the entire time it has existed, then close to it.  Probably because the tolls are so high and, when it opened, ETC was in its infancy in the US.

 4 
 on: Today at 12:02:14 PM 
Started by Roadwarriors79 - Last post by kalvado
On the other hand, I will only be fully satisfied once the US and Canada combine all toll tags into one, inter-operable device. That's a hefty goal, but that's what I want.

I'm not sure efforts should stop even there--Mexico has toll roads with ETC too.  ETC interoperability is plausibly advantageous to the motorist throughout the entire extent of a paved road network that a given vehicle can reach without resorting to ferries for over-water crossings.  From this standpoint toll roads in the entirety of North and Central America (everything from Panama north) should be interoperable with each other, while there is no need to seek interoperability with any South American operators that have ETC (no road through the Darien Gap, RORO or container shipment of cars Houston-Cartagena possible but difficult to arrange, Panama City-Cartagena vehicle ferry a mirage), let alone any European or Asian ones.
Don't ask too much, you may get nothing after all. Getting things work smoothly within the USA is a good step anyway. That would, hopefully, create a good network and supply of equipment (tags and software) so joining existing system would be relatively easy....

 5 
 on: Today at 11:57:46 AM 
Started by V'Ger - Last post by frankenroad
I didn't notice Michigan in this thread yet. 

Probably both the highest and lowest points are both on I-75.  Certainly the lowest is I-75 along Lake Erie.  I'd guess the highest is somewhere up near Gaylord.

Without researching it, I would have to agree with you on both counts.

 6 
 on: Today at 11:41:52 AM 
Started by BigMattFromTexas - Last post by PHLBOS
I don't think I ever stopped seeing Clearview on mast arm signs in PennDOT construction plans even when the plug was pulled on the IA.
Actually, this replacement street-blade sign (from about a year ago) is certainly not Clearview; looks to be Series D.   2012 GSV showing the older Clearview sign.

 7 
 on: Today at 11:28:07 AM 
Started by cpzilliacus - Last post by kalvado
A strange detail I noticed in the reports (it didn't take very long for me, heh) - group was heading to Ommegang brewery.
Which is quite a bit further west along either I-88 or NY-7 (they run pretty much in parallel).
However, there is no good reason to continue straight along NY-30 into the stretch where crash occurred. Driver should have turned right on a previous intersection at stop sign. Assuming they were coming from Amsterdam along NY-30, there is no TO I-88 shield on that arm of the intersection - but there is one on NY-7 just past the intersection, visible from the stop line on NY-30.
As someone who's driven between Amsterdam and Cooperstown a few times, I would further suggest that the best route is NY 30 -> US 20 -> NY 80, avoiding that area and I-88 altogether.  I have wondered if the group asked for an intermediate stop in Schoharie or something that caused this routing to be chosen.

They certainly couldn't have been headed directly from Amsterdam to that brewery, or they would likely never come near - and certainly not south of - I-88. Unless the driver missed the turn for NY 7, which isn't an outrageous possibility.
Anyone who assumes a limo or bus driver would take the most logical route hasn't spent much time riding in limos or buses.

I am not sure what is the most logical route for a vehicle as strange as a stretched limo. I did drive  in the area a few times, including Ommegang and entire Cooperstown beverage trail - and I had a few moments when I (in a pretty standard sedan) was thinking if I am actually going to make it on that road, or it is designed for 4x4 only.  I can see some logic in taking a detour to maximize interstate mileage and reduce local roads.
Difference between Google maps optimal routing (I-90 to NY-166)  and I-88 routing is 8 miles and 7 minutes; routing @Jim suggested is actually another 3 minutes slower.  And while US-20 is a nice drive, those NY routes through the hills are often less than great.
 

 8 
 on: Today at 11:17:33 AM 
Started by BigMattFromTexas - Last post by J N Winkler
Not looking too good for Pennsylvania. A recently-improved local intersection in Lebanon has Clearview overhead blades.

Are those local streets in that intersection PennDOT-maintained roads?  Even if such were, I have seen many fonts (besides Clearview & Highway Gothic) used on street blade signs... especially on ones mounted on traffic signal poles.

I don't think I ever stopped seeing Clearview on mast arm signs in PennDOT construction plans even when the plug was pulled on the IA.  I am reluctant to regard fonts on this type of sign as indicative of the agency's typeface policy, for the following reasons:

*  Traffic signal plans could spend more time on the shelf than plans for major projects.

*  Empirical observation in most states (not just Pennsylvania) reveals that typeface conformity on mast arm signs is typically much poorer than for other types of guide sign.  Local agencies often want to use whatever font looks "cool" and are usually better positioned to get their way than with even D-series guide signs.

 9 
 on: Today at 11:10:57 AM 
Started by Chris - Last post by US71
Just saw a posting from Southaven officials that the I-269 ribbon-cutting will be Friday, October 26 at 10:00am.

Which end? I may try to go.

 10 
 on: Today at 11:10:49 AM 
Started by CNGL-Leudimin - Last post by WillWeaverRVA
Willa is now a Cat 4 in the EPAC. (We’ve had TEN now) could hit Cat 5

It's a Category 5 now.


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