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Author Topic: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom  (Read 225952 times)

JayhawkCO

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1300 on: December 10, 2021, 03:27:02 PM »

Lake County, Indiana, borders both a county with a population over 5 million (Cook, IL) and one with a population under 15,000 (Newton, IN).

In a similar vein, the most populous county in Colorado is not in the most populous metro area.  El Paso County surpassed Denver County.

I started thinking about this more and was curious which other states had their most populous county not in their most populous metro area.  When dealing with multi-state metro areas, I'll use the portion of the metro area in the state in question.

Colorado - Most Populous County - El Paso (Colorado Springs), Most Populous Metro Area - Denver
Connecticut - Most Populous County - Fairfield (Bridgeport), Most Populous Metro Area - Hartford
Maryland - Most Populous County - Montgomery (Rockville), Most Populous Metro Area - Baltimore
New Hampshire - Most Populous County - Hillsborough (Manchester), Most Populous Metro Area - Boston (just the NH counties)
North Carolina - Most Populous County - Wake (Raleigh), Most Populous Metro Area - Charlotte
Tennessee - Most Populous County - Shelby (Memphis), Most Populous Metro Area - Nashville
Texas - Most Populous County - Harris (Houston), Most Populous Metro Area - Dallas/Fort Worth

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1301 on: December 11, 2021, 03:56:59 PM »

Summit County, Utah borders both Utah's most populous county (Salt Lake, 1.19M) and its least (Daggett, 935).

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1302 on: December 11, 2021, 09:48:20 PM »

North Carolina is a now a quirk of demographics, but Charlotte (Mecklenburg County) remains the largest city whereas now Wake County (Raleigh) is the largest county.  Both Charlotte and Mecklenburg were the largest as recently as 2018.  It would not surprise me that borth Raleigh and Wake take over as the largest in near future.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1303 on: December 12, 2021, 08:25:36 PM »

North Carolina is a now a quirk of demographics, but Charlotte (Mecklenburg County) remains the largest city whereas now Wake County (Raleigh) is the largest county.  Both Charlotte and Mecklenburg were the largest as recently as 2018.  It would not surprise me that borth Raleigh and Wake take over as the largest in near future.

Wake County is larger area-wise, so it's not surprising that it holds more people. Unless Mecklenburg County decides to do some Northeast-like high density suburbs, I don't think they'll ever take back the title of largest county.

Also, unless Raleigh expands its city limits, I doubt they'll overtake Charlotte anytime soon. Neither city is known for high density (except in and close to downtown).
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1304 on: December 12, 2021, 09:52:38 PM »

Connecticut - Most Populous County - Fairfield (Bridgeport), Most Populous Metro Area - Hartford
Maryland - Most Populous County - Montgomery (Rockville), Most Populous Metro Area - Baltimore
New Hampshire - Most Populous County - Hillsborough (Manchester), Most Populous Metro Area - Boston (just the NH counties)

To be fair, the distinction between metro areas in these states is academic at best. But I get that you have to draw the line somewhere.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1305 on: December 12, 2021, 10:44:17 PM »

Lake County, Indiana, borders both a county with a population over 5 million (Cook, IL) and one with a population under 15,000 (Newton, IN).

Decided to look around and see what are WA's starkest population differences between counties with an intermediate:

King (2.3 million) borders Chelan, which borders Douglas (42,938)


In fact, King County also borders Kittitas County, which is only slightly bigger (44,337).

Clark (503,311) borders Cowlitz, which borders Wahkiakum (4,422)

It's going to be tough to beat Clark and Lincoln counties in Nevada. Wiki says 2.3 million for Clark and 4500 for Lincoln.


Texas with Harris 4.7 million to San Jacinto with about 28K. Hardin has barely more with about 30K

In north Texas Collin County Has 1.1 million and Delta County has around 5K

Bexar with just over 2 Million and Real County with about 3,500  probably wins the percentage for texas
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1306 on: December 13, 2021, 10:43:38 PM »

This is sort of a shower thought. When zoomed out on a map, Pittsburgh just looks so weirdly placed. Of course, when you zoom in and see the confluence of three major rivers, it makes sense. But it's in the middle of the mountains with no other cities even close to its size within its geographical region - Cleveland is the nearest major city, but Cleveland is very much in the Midwestern flatlands (relax, almighty Carhorn), while Pittsburgh is in the mountains

Not sure if that makes any sense.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1307 on: December 14, 2021, 12:44:53 AM »

This is sort of a shower thought. When zoomed out on a map, Pittsburgh just looks so weirdly placed. Of course, when you zoom in and see the confluence of three major rivers, it makes sense. But it's in the middle of the mountains with no other cities even close to its size within its geographical region - Cleveland is the nearest major city, but Cleveland is very much in the Midwestern flatlands (relax, almighty Carhorn), while Pittsburgh is in the mountains

Not sure if that makes any sense.

While Pittsburgh has a distinctly Appalachian feel, it's not so much in the mountains but rather the Allegheny Plateau (as indeed much of Appalachia is). It's a dissected plateau, so the terrain is very much hill-and-valley, but not quite with the relief differences of a mountainous area.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1308 on: December 14, 2021, 02:25:08 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1309 on: December 14, 2021, 02:44:59 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.

Obviously Colorado is 1st now, but I'd think Atlanta is still 2nd, maybe 3rd. Arizona the other one that might be higher.
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JayhawkCO

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1310 on: December 14, 2021, 02:47:01 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.

Obviously Colorado is 1st now, but I'd think Atlanta is still 2nd, maybe 3rd. Arizona the other one that might be higher.

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1311 on: December 14, 2021, 02:56:15 PM »

This is sort of a shower thought. When zoomed out on a map, Pittsburgh just looks so weirdly placed. Of course, when you zoom in and see the confluence of three major rivers, it makes sense. But it's in the middle of the mountains with no other cities even close to its size within its geographical region - Cleveland is the nearest major city, but Cleveland is very much in the Midwestern flatlands (relax, almighty Carhorn), while Pittsburgh is in the mountains

Not sure if that makes any sense.

While Pittsburgh has a distinctly Appalachian feel, it's not so much in the mountains but rather the Allegheny Plateau (as indeed much of Appalachia is). It's a dissected plateau, so the terrain is very much hill-and-valley, but not quite with the relief differences of a mountainous area.

It's amazing how the tilt of the Appalachian Plateau skews the whole perception of the upper Ohio Valley.  The elevation in Morgantown, West Virginia ranges from about 800 feet along the Monongahela River to a mere 1400 feet at Sky Rock.  That's similar to the difference than Pittsburgh at a hair over 700 feet at the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers, versus 1370 feet on top of Observatory Hill.  But the elevation differences along the New and Gauley rivers in central West Virginia are a whole different story.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1312 on: December 14, 2021, 03:14:19 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.

Obviously Colorado is 1st now, but I'd think Atlanta is still 2nd, maybe 3rd. Arizona the other one that might be higher.


I would've never thought that Minute Maid Park has a higher elevation than 12 other MLB ballparks. Their ballpark has the third-highest elevation in the AL West!

On a different note, I always forget how high up in terms of elevation the Midwest is, considering its flatness when compared with the coastal flatlands.

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1313 on: December 14, 2021, 03:32:23 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.

Obviously Colorado is 1st now, but I'd think Atlanta is still 2nd, maybe 3rd. Arizona the other one that might be higher.


I would've never thought that Minute Maid Park has a higher elevation than 12 other MLB ballparks. Their ballpark has the third-highest elevation in the AL West!

On a different note, I always forget how high up in terms of elevation the Midwest is, considering its flatness when compared with the coastal flatlands.

Yeah, the Great Lakes upstream from Buffalo is a lot higher than downstream from Buffalo. It's like the system just Falls right down to a different level.
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dlsterner

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1314 on: December 14, 2021, 03:42:43 PM »

On a different note, I always forget how high up in terms of elevation the Midwest is, considering its flatness when compared with the coastal flatlands.

Be careful, lest you invoke the wrath of Lord Carhorn ...

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1315 on: December 14, 2021, 05:29:30 PM »

Yeah, the Twins having the fifth-highest elevation of MLB ballparks is one I never would have considered either.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1316 on: December 14, 2021, 05:33:02 PM »

On a different note, I always forget how high up in terms of elevation the Midwest is, considering its flatness when compared with the coastal flatlands.

Be careful, lest you invoke the wrath of Lord Carhorn ...

I think he’s gone back to complaining how people drive in apartment complexes and trying to find the good in Illinois. 
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1317 on: December 14, 2021, 07:44:58 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.

Obviously Colorado is 1st now, but I'd think Atlanta is still 2nd, maybe 3rd. Arizona the other one that might be higher.


I would've never thought that Minute Maid Park has a higher elevation than 12 other MLB ballparks. Their ballpark has the third-highest elevation in the AL West!

On a different note, I always forget how high up in terms of elevation the Midwest is, considering its flatness when compared with the coastal flatlands.

Yeah, the Great Lakes upstream from Buffalo is a lot higher than downstream from Buffalo. It's like the system just Falls right down to a different level.

When is that altitude chart from, since it doesn't show the obvious Colorado Rockies difference?

If that is from the pre-Rockies era, then Cleveland's elevation is based on where Cleveland Browns Stadium currently sits ‐‐  Progressive (Jacobs) Field was built away from the lakeshore on the bluff downtown and may have eclipsed Pittsburgh's old and new stadiums with the meager altitude change.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1318 on: December 14, 2021, 08:12:33 PM »

Scroll the chart to the right. It shows the obvious Colorado difference.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1319 on: December 14, 2021, 09:51:27 PM »

Years ago, when there were just 12 major league baseball teams in the National League, I was surprised to learn that the NL team -- indeed, maybe even in all of MLB -- with the stadium with the highest elevation above sea level was Atlanta. But when I thought about it some, and considering Atlanta's proximity to the Appalachian Mountains, it made total sense. I think it surprised me to know that the old Fulton County Stadium was higher than Three Rivers, given Pittsburgh's location in the mountains, but that stadium was next to a major body of water in a valley.
And to think some sports writers actually used Atlanta's elevation (all of 1,050 feet) to throw shade at Henry Aaron's home run total back in the late 60s and early 70s.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1320 on: February 01, 2022, 03:57:49 PM »

Lake County, Indiana, borders both a county with a population over 5 million (Cook, IL) and one with a population under 15,000 (Newton, IN).

Decided to look around and see what are WA's starkest population differences between counties with an intermediate:

King (2.3 million) borders Chelan, which borders Douglas (42,938)

In fact, King County also borders Kittitas County, which is only slightly bigger (44,337).

Clark (503,311) borders Cowlitz, which borders Wahkiakum (4,422)

It's going to be tough to beat Clark and Lincoln counties in Nevada. Wiki says 2.3 million for Clark and 4500 for Lincoln.
California - LA County - 9.8 million vs Inyo 18,546. Both counties are adjacent to Kern County and San Bernardino County.
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1321 on: February 02, 2022, 10:46:05 PM »

Lake County, Indiana, borders both a county with a population over 5 million (Cook, IL) and one with a population under 15,000 (Newton, IN).

Decided to look around and see what are WA's starkest population differences between counties with an intermediate:

King (2.3 million) borders Chelan, which borders Douglas (42,938)

In fact, King County also borders Kittitas County, which is only slightly bigger (44,337).

Clark (503,311) borders Cowlitz, which borders Wahkiakum (4,422)

It's going to be tough to beat Clark and Lincoln counties in Nevada. Wiki says 2.3 million for Clark and 4500 for Lincoln.
California - LA County - 9.8 million vs Inyo 18,546. Both counties are adjacent to Kern County and San Bernardino County.
Very nearly a TIE!
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1322 on: March 06, 2022, 03:24:45 PM »

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1323 on: March 06, 2022, 06:30:51 PM »


Heh.  I have seen so many versions of this that are wrong that it is hard to trust one when it's right.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2022, 06:58:53 PM by Rothman »
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1324 on: March 06, 2022, 06:54:09 PM »

It's going to be tough to beat Clark and Lincoln counties in Nevada. Wiki says 2.3 million for Clark and 4500 for Lincoln.

In Hawaii, Maui County's 2020 Census population was 164,754. Kalawao County, only 82. Those two counties share a land border, but neither has a land border with any other county.
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