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Author Topic: Does Connecticut set a record for the number of partially completed freeways?  (Read 7812 times)

3467

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Should have been clear. The Stoney Island Feeder ramp was the Lake Shore Drive extension end and so are the skyway ramps. There used to be a BGS with all those routes on LSD. Not sure if still there.
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Alps

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To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. For Mass I can think of 4:
2
44
57
146
I'll modify my list. I-290 was a serious proposal, though.

Really? I can't find anything about it outside of bostonroads.com.

Bostonroads is reputable.


To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. ....

If I might clarify, what counts as "partially completed"? I'm thinking of "ghost ramp" situations, for example. Certainly in some of those situations there's no question that a road counts as partially completed—the abandoned Richmond Parkway interchange on I-278 on Staten Island, for example, would have led to a road whose other end was constructed for part of the way across the island, and while I-70 never made it to the ghost ramps on I-95 in Baltimore there is no question that I-70 obviously exists.

But then you have this thing in New Jersey where all you have is an overpass and the obvious outline of what would have been a cloverleaf: https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7546124,-74.3832214,504m/data=!3m1!1e3

I'm wondering whether the latter sort of thing is "enough" to count as partially completed. My initial reaction would be "no."
Triborough Road wasn't a freeway at all.

I know they are, but if the I-290 extension was really serious, there'd have been lots of evidence for it. People in Sudbury would tell the story of how they fought off the highway builders, there'd have been lawsuits, and angry town hall meetings like there was for Super 7 and the Somerset Freeway.
I disagree with that method of assessment. It was serious enough to leave a stub at the eastern interchange and had plans into the 1970s actively. Not every freeway was defeated decisively. Not everything is an NJ 24 or Somerset Freeway tale. For example, NJ 18's southern 6 miles died with very little fanfare and very little in the way of public concern. It just never made it.

Roadsguy

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*snip*

You forgot the Roosevelt Expressway and PA 309.

I left those out because I figured they were planned as entirely separate sections, though that definition is vague enough that they may count. The Roosevelt Expressway was already finished when the Northeast Expressway was being proposed, for instance.
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Atlanta alone has quite a lot:

I-675 (which was to connect to GA 400 further north)
I-485 (which was to use GA 10 and connect to the Stone Mountain Freeway further east)
I-420 (which was to continue east from the I-75/I-85/GA 166 interchange and connect to I-20)
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storm2k

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To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. For Mass I can think of 4:
2
44
57
146
I'll modify my list. I-290 was a serious proposal, though.

Really? I can't find anything about it outside of bostonroads.com.

Bostonroads is reputable.


To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. ....

If I might clarify, what counts as "partially completed"? I'm thinking of "ghost ramp" situations, for example. Certainly in some of those situations there's no question that a road counts as partially completed—the abandoned Richmond Parkway interchange on I-278 on Staten Island, for example, would have led to a road whose other end was constructed for part of the way across the island, and while I-70 never made it to the ghost ramps on I-95 in Baltimore there is no question that I-70 obviously exists.

But then you have this thing in New Jersey where all you have is an overpass and the obvious outline of what would have been a cloverleaf: https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7546124,-74.3832214,504m/data=!3m1!1e3

I'm wondering whether the latter sort of thing is "enough" to count as partially completed. My initial reaction would be "no."
Triborough Road wasn't a freeway at all.

I know they are, but if the I-290 extension was really serious, there'd have been lots of evidence for it. People in Sudbury would tell the story of how they fought off the highway builders, there'd have been lawsuits, and angry town hall meetings like there was for Super 7 and the Somerset Freeway.
I disagree with that method of assessment. It was serious enough to leave a stub at the eastern interchange and had plans into the 1970s actively. Not every freeway was defeated decisively. Not everything is an NJ 24 or Somerset Freeway tale. For example, NJ 18's southern 6 miles died with very little fanfare and very little in the way of public concern. It just never made it.

I always thought a big factor in the death of the southern six miles of NJ-18 was a landowner who would not sell and the state either couldn't win or didn't want to go through the expense of trying to gain the land via eminent domain and they just kind of let it die? Or is that just apocrypha at this point?
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kernals12

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Atlanta alone has quite a lot:

I-675 (which was to connect to GA 400 further north)
I-485 (which was to use GA 10 and connect to the Stone Mountain Freeway further east)
I-420 (which was to continue east from the I-75/I-85/GA 166 interchange and connect to I-20)

I think they cancelled that one because the state would've gone bankrupt replacing the signs as they got stolen.

I suspect this will be a big problem for I-69.
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kernals12

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To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. For Mass I can think of 4:
2
44
57
146
I'll modify my list. I-290 was a serious proposal, though.

Really? I can't find anything about it outside of bostonroads.com.

Bostonroads is reputable.


To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. ....

If I might clarify, what counts as "partially completed"? I'm thinking of "ghost ramp" situations, for example. Certainly in some of those situations there's no question that a road counts as partially completed—the abandoned Richmond Parkway interchange on I-278 on Staten Island, for example, would have led to a road whose other end was constructed for part of the way across the island, and while I-70 never made it to the ghost ramps on I-95 in Baltimore there is no question that I-70 obviously exists.

But then you have this thing in New Jersey where all you have is an overpass and the obvious outline of what would have been a cloverleaf: https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7546124,-74.3832214,504m/data=!3m1!1e3

I'm wondering whether the latter sort of thing is "enough" to count as partially completed. My initial reaction would be "no."
Triborough Road wasn't a freeway at all.

I know they are, but if the I-290 extension was really serious, there'd have been lots of evidence for it. People in Sudbury would tell the story of how they fought off the highway builders, there'd have been lawsuits, and angry town hall meetings like there was for Super 7 and the Somerset Freeway.
I disagree with that method of assessment. It was serious enough to leave a stub at the eastern interchange and had plans into the 1970s actively. Not every freeway was defeated decisively. Not everything is an NJ 24 or Somerset Freeway tale. For example, NJ 18's southern 6 miles died with very little fanfare and very little in the way of public concern. It just never made it.

I always thought a big factor in the death of the southern six miles of NJ-18 was a landowner who would not sell and the state either couldn't win or didn't want to go through the expense of trying to gain the land via eminent domain and they just kind of let it die? Or is that just apocrypha at this point?

If they weren't willing to go through with eminent domain, then clearly it wasn't a big priority for them.
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Revive 755

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Since we are national . Those are good Rules
Illinois
Chicago area
Illinois 53 at lake cook. Extension just cancelled tollway and IDOT  have land

Probably until sometime this year.

IL. 390 connection West seriously studied

Also had much of the ROW acquired to the connection to US 20 west of Hanover Park, and has a new study for a partial connection to County Farm Road.

Supposedly part of IL 19 I think this section) was upgraded as part of the original plan to connect to the Tri-State south of O'Hare.

Not the Amstutz. It's a spur but the study recommended the arterial that exists.

The section by downtown Waukegan was supposed to connect to the "Bobby Thompson Expressway" section as a freeway.


South Extension of 355 was just a line.
There are the well discussed stony Island and Cermak  ramps.
Almost everything else never went beyond some studies and ROW.

The Ohio Street feeder may count as part of the version of I-494 that was to use Lake Shore Drive.

EDIT:  I've wondered if the South Street overpass on the US 14 bypass of Woodstock may be the only portion of the Evanston-Harvard corridor to be built.  (end edit)

Elsewhere in Illinois
* The western I-39/US 20 interchange was built for a freeway that would have gone to downtown Rockford.
* East St. Louis has the stub for a freeway that would have gone from the PSB Complex to IL 15 at IL 163.
* US 50 between the cloverleaf at I-64 and IL 127.  If you look at the 1988 imagery in Google Earth the east outer road at the IL 158 interchange had more of a jog that appears to indicate where the freeway would have curved east.
* The supplemental freeway that would have been an extension of I-39 south of Bloomington-Normal to Decatur got stubs, extra pavement and space for future BGS's on I-72.

Missouri
* MO 755, though soon the only part left will be the extra wide ramp from southbound Truman Parkway to southbound I-55.  There used to be a northbound stub at the I-55 interchange, the part near US 40 is being removed, and there used to be a partially constructed section under I-70 just north of Branch Street.
* US 71/Bruce Watkins in Kansas City
* The unbuilt route that would have tied into I-70 at the Jackson Curve in Kansas City.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2021, 10:04:39 PM by Revive 755 »
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kernals12

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To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. For Mass I can think of 4:
2
44
57
146
I'll modify my list. I-290 was a serious proposal, though.

Really? I can't find anything about it outside of bostonroads.com.

Bostonroads is reputable.


To set some rules: The freeway has to have been a very serious proposal, not just highway planners throwing lines on a map, so the I-290 extension to Waltham doesn't count, and to be considered partially completed, the freeway has to have been planned as one complete project, so Boston's Southwest Expressway doesn't because it was planned separately from the rest of I-95. ....

If I might clarify, what counts as "partially completed"? I'm thinking of "ghost ramp" situations, for example. Certainly in some of those situations there's no question that a road counts as partially completed—the abandoned Richmond Parkway interchange on I-278 on Staten Island, for example, would have led to a road whose other end was constructed for part of the way across the island, and while I-70 never made it to the ghost ramps on I-95 in Baltimore there is no question that I-70 obviously exists.

But then you have this thing in New Jersey where all you have is an overpass and the obvious outline of what would have been a cloverleaf: https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7546124,-74.3832214,504m/data=!3m1!1e3

I'm wondering whether the latter sort of thing is "enough" to count as partially completed. My initial reaction would be "no."
Triborough Road wasn't a freeway at all.

I know they are, but if the I-290 extension was really serious, there'd have been lots of evidence for it. People in Sudbury would tell the story of how they fought off the highway builders, there'd have been lawsuits, and angry town hall meetings like there was for Super 7 and the Somerset Freeway.
I disagree with that method of assessment. It was serious enough to leave a stub at the eastern interchange and had plans into the 1970s actively. Not every freeway was defeated decisively. Not everything is an NJ 24 or Somerset Freeway tale. For example, NJ 18's southern 6 miles died with very little fanfare and very little in the way of public concern. It just never made it.

Actually, according to bostonroads.com, I-290 was originally planned to terminate at the I-90, I-495 interchange. They moved it north for a possible future extension east. So that means the unbuilt extension was planned separately from what was built, so it violates my 2nd rule. Also, let's compare it to a freeway that was planned on a relatively close alignment, the MA 2 expressway. Unlike the I-290 extension, MA 2 actually was serious, they even filed an Environmental Impact Statement, but they cancelled it because there just wasn't enough money.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2021, 09:02:05 AM by kernals12 »
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kernals12

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I'll direct you to Kurumi's map of Hartford's cancelled highways.  http://kurumi.com/roads/ct/pics/art-hfd-fwy-60s.png
Now granted, some roads represented on that map weren't even attempted, such as the CT 83, CT 20 east of the river, CT 140 expressways.  For other expressways, it fills in some missing pieces (such as why the short expressway of CT 187/189 in Granby), same with CT 190 in Enfield).

From just that map I think I count 11 partially completed freeways that obey my rules:
189, 190, 291, 84, 484, 9, 10, 72, 284, 491, 501

Then off hand from the rest of the state:
25, 34, 11, 2, 2A, 8, 32, 40, 691, 78, and I'd count 7 twice as the unfinished part from Norwalk to Danbury was planned separately from the unfinished part from Brookfield to the state line
« Last Edit: January 10, 2021, 09:43:12 AM by kernals12 »
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Alps

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Actually, according to bostonroads.com, I-290 was originally planned to terminate at the I-90, I-495 interchange. They moved it north for a possible future extension east. So that means the unbuilt extension was planned separately from what was built, so it violates my 2nd rule. Also, let's compare it to a freeway that was planned on a relatively close alignment, the MA 2 expressway. Unlike the I-290 extension, MA 2 actually was serious, they even filed an Environmental Impact Statement, but they cancelled it because there just wasn't enough money.
You are correct, but my interpretation is that because the alignment that was actually built is the one that was moved north, they built part of the final concept, so it's continuous. Regardless, no one's keeping a record book for this so we can feel free to have differing interpretations.

Henry

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Since we are national . Those are good Rules
Illinois
Chicago area
Illinois 53 at lake cook. Extension just cancelled tollway and IDOT  have land
IL. 390 connection West seriously studied
Not the Amstutz. It's a spur but the study recommended the arterial that exists.
South Extension of 355 was just a line.
There are the well discussed stony Island and Cermak  ramps.
Almost everything else never went beyond some studies and ROW.

You forgot Lakeshore Drive, that was supposed to be turned into an interstate highway.
The Ohio Street feeder may count as part of the version of I-494 that was to use Lake Shore Drive.
When I think of I-494, I remember it as the Crosstown Expressway, none of which was ever built. The I-494 you're referring to was actually renumbered to I-694 after new plans for the Crosstown were formed.
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3467

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Yes you are right Henry. Interesting most of the Crosstown ROW is there . That's why there is still a mini crosstown kept alive by CMAP.
Although it's need keeps slipping away. Volumes on those North South arterial keep declining. Also Lake Shore Drive has been improved through the South works area.
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kernals12

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Yes you are right Henry. Interesting most of the Crosstown ROW is there . That's why there is still a mini crosstown kept alive by CMAP.
Although it's need keeps slipping away. Volumes on those North South arterial keep declining. Also Lake Shore Drive has been improved through the South works area.

Plus, given Illinois' chronic fiscal woes...
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nexus73

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Portland had the Mount Hood Freeway ROW bought and then cancelled it in the 70's as they shifted towards light rail.  Also in PDX was the proposed I-505, a short freeway coming off I-405.  A very small section of freeway as US 30 is there.

Salem was to get I-305.  They wound up with the Salem Parkway.  The connection with I-5 is on the north end of this city.

Maybe some other Oregon poster will come along to add more details.

Rick
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