AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules to ensure post quality. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Urbs that are mostly suburban  (Read 1480 times)

Road Hog

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1708
  • Location: Collin County, TX
  • Last Login: Today at 05:01:18 AM
Urbs that are mostly suburban
« on: December 19, 2021, 03:54:37 AM »

I was thinking of Fort Worth and how much it has grown in the last 30 years. The core city was about 300K in 1990 and now it's probably triple that through aggressive annexations. Just about all that growth is due to expansion in neighborhoods that could be called "suburban" in nature but are in actuality part of the central city.

Are there any comps nationally? Orlando seems one to me.
Logged

tolbs17

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4630
  • Age: 19
  • Location: Greenville, NC
  • Last Login: March 31, 2022, 07:24:24 PM
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2021, 04:18:08 AM »

Raleigh, North Carolina as well as Fayetteville can classify as one. When I go there, it doesn't feel like a real city compared to cities like Charlotte or Atlanta.

Winston-Salem and Greensboro were more populated than Raleigh back in the 1960s but now are behind.

Cary too... A lot of urban sprawl happened there and their downtown looks like a town with 30,000 people.

Richmond, Virginia looks more like a real city to me.
Logged

Max Rockatansky

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 18574
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Route 9, Sector 26
  • Last Login: Today at 01:28:23 PM
    • Gribblenation
Logged

Takumi

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4558
  • now with even more cars!

  • Age: 36
  • Location: central VA
  • Last Login: Today at 09:40:14 AM
    • The Practical Hoon (blog)
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2021, 12:16:09 PM »

Virginia Beach is the largest city in Virginia, and Chesapeake is up there as well, but are both almost entirely suburban and still have some rural parts.
Logged
I challenge Joe Biden to a debate five minutes from now. He's gonna look real bad if he doesn't show up.

Don’t @ me. Seriously.

Scott5114

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14917
  • Nit picker of unprecedented pedantry

  • Age: 32
  • Location: Norman, OK
  • Last Login: Today at 02:40:41 AM
    • Denexa 100% Plastic Playing Cards
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2021, 01:41:36 PM »

The vast majority of Oklahoma City's land area is either suburban or rural in character.
Logged

SkyPesos

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4415
  • Age: 19
  • Location: Cincinnati, OH/Lafayette, IN
  • Last Login: Today at 01:10:02 PM
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2021, 02:18:54 PM »

How do we differentiate between urban and suburban here, especially with single family homes residential areas? Do streets laid out in a grid count as urban, and windy streets/cul de sacs count as suburban?
Logged
My Fictional Highways

Fundamental Theorem of AARoads - Let "y" represent the elevation above sea level in a certain area. If "Δy" between the highest and lowest values of y equals to 0, it's Illinois.

Bruce

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 4242
  • Transit Commuter

  • Age: 25
  • Location: Snohomish County, WA
  • Last Login: Today at 12:47:05 AM
    • Wikipedia
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2021, 01:13:19 AM »

Most American cities probably fit the bill.

For example, 69% of Seattle's residential land is zoned exclusively for single-family homes.

Road Hog

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1708
  • Location: Collin County, TX
  • Last Login: Today at 05:01:18 AM
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2021, 01:38:22 AM »

How do we differentiate between urban and suburban here, especially with single family homes residential areas? Do streets laid out in a grid count as urban, and windy streets/cul de sacs count as suburban?
I'd say any type of themed subdivision or planned development consisting mostly of single-family homes (especially those new within the last 15 to 20 years) would classify as "suburban" in style.
Logged

KCRoadFan

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 662
  • Enthusiastic fan of roads, sports, and waterparks.

  • Age: 28
  • Location: Kansas City, MO
  • Last Login: Today at 01:23:22 PM
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2021, 11:07:29 AM »

Kansas City, where I live, comes to mind - to me, the central part in Jackson County is the “real” city, whereas the Northland (Clay and Platte Counties) - as well as the areas of the Jackson County portion east of 435 out by the stadiums, along with south KC - feel like a bunch of suburbs, even though it’s all within city limits.
Logged

KCRoadFan

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 662
  • Enthusiastic fan of roads, sports, and waterparks.

  • Age: 28
  • Location: Kansas City, MO
  • Last Login: Today at 01:23:22 PM
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2021, 11:09:27 AM »

I was thinking of Fort Worth and how much it has grown in the last 30 years. The core city was about 300K in 1990 and now it's probably triple that through aggressive annexations. Just about all that growth is due to expansion in neighborhoods that could be called "suburban" in nature but are in actuality part of the central city.

Are there any comps nationally? Orlando seems one to me.

Looking at the maps of Dallas and Houston, it appears that those cities are like that too. Seems to be common in Texas.
Logged

webny99

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10030
  • An ode to the road bestowed

  • Age: 22
  • Location: Monroe County, NY
  • Last Login: Today at 10:28:05 AM
Re: Urbs that are mostly suburban
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2021, 03:22:07 PM »

How do we differentiate between urban and suburban here, especially with single family homes residential areas? Do streets laid out in a grid count as urban, and windy streets/cul de sacs count as suburban?

"Windy" threw me off for a minute!  :D

It's a good question, though. Is this, for example, considered suburban? I would personally call it urban since it's with city limits. Yet I understand this doesn't work for cities in the South and West that annex all their suburbs, which is another reason I dislike that practice.
Logged
On April 25, 2022, I became the 20th user in forum history to Like the Forum Way, Way Too Much. And then I found that there's another way...
__ _______ ___ __ _______ _____

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.