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Author Topic: In preparation for I-27 extension, expect bypass and/or 4-lane upgrades...  (Read 26025 times)

ethanhopkin14

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I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.
What states only have majors? If we’re not counting auxiliary, I know Kansas and Delaware are on that list too—is this too off topic? LOL

Wyoming and Rhode Island

Maine. 

If is wasn't for I-76 West sticking itself in for a 2 miles, Nebraska would be on this list. 
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Bobby5280

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Quote from: ethanhopkin14
I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.

I don't have any realistic expectations New Mexico's state government will follow through building a leg of I-27. US-287 going up into SE CO has the best chance for upgrades.
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ethanhopkin14

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Quote from: ethanhopkin14
I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.

I don't have any realistic expectations New Mexico's state government will follow through building a leg of I-27. US-287 going up into SE CO has the best chance for upgrades.

I love that option better anyway, the one to Limon. 
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Some one

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I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.
On the flipside, North Dakota and Vermont are the only states to have non-major interstate routes (excluding Alaska and Hawaii).
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dvferyance

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I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.
On the flipside, North Dakota and Vermont are the only states to have non-major interstate routes (excluding Alaska and Hawaii).
I-94 doesn't count as major?
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Some one

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I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.
On the flipside, North Dakota and Vermont are the only states to have non-major interstate routes (excluding Alaska and Hawaii).
I-94 doesn't count as major?
Technically no. A major interstate highway is one that ends in 5 or 0. This is why I-45 and I-30, while short, are still considered to be major interstates. Although I-94 is one of the most important "non-major" interstate highways.
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Rothman

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I just realized, if I-27 does go to Raton, that will remove New Mexico from the small list of states that only have major interstate routes in it.
On the flipside, North Dakota and Vermont are the only states to have non-major interstate routes (excluding Alaska and Hawaii).
I-94 doesn't count as major?
Technically no. A major interstate highway is one that ends in 5 or 0. This is why I-45 and I-30, while short, are still considered to be major interstates. Although I-94 is one of the most important "non-major" interstate highways.
Makes me wonder where that definition is codified.  I think the popular YouTube video going around makes that distinction, but I'd like to see a link from FHWA or AASHTO that makes that distinction.
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Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Bobby5280

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I don't think there is any official definition for what qualifies as a major or minor Interstate highway. If a bad accident or other serious event happens on any 2-digit Interstate the press is likely to refer to the route as a "major" Interstate highway.

Generally, the one or two digit routes that end in "0" or "5" are legitimately major Interstate highways. Then there are others which either run long distances and/or carry large amounts of traffic. I-94 qualifies as a major Interstate. I think I-81 through Virginia and up into Pennsylvania is a very important route. The same goes for I-44 between St Louis and Oklahoma City.
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US 89

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Makes me wonder where that definition is codified.  I think the popular YouTube video going around makes that distinction, but I'd like to see a link from FHWA or AASHTO that makes that distinction.

I found a FHWA page that makes that distinction... but for US highways, and also clarifies that US 2 should be considered on equal standing with the x0 routes:

Quote
For the principal east-west routes, James assigned two-digit numbers ending in zero. For the principal north-south routes, he assigned numbers ending in 1 or 5. With these base routes numbered, the remaining routes could be numbered accordingly. He thought three-digit numbers, which he considered inevitable, should be assigned to short sections, cutoffs, and crossovers. Logical alternate routes should be given the number of the principal line of traffic, plus 100. Thus, under his original scheme, an alternate for U.S. 55 would be U.S. 155.

On September 25, the Committee of Five met in the Jefferson Hotel in St. Louis to complete the numbering plan. The committee followed James' concept. Transcontinental and principal east-west routes were assigned multiples of 10, with the lowest number along the Canadian border (U.S. 2, chosen to avoid a U.S. 0). The principal north-south routes were given numbers ending in 1, with U.S. 1 along the East Coast. The north-south routes of considerable length but secondary importance were given numbers ending in 5.

For interstate highway numbering, the only FHWA source I was able to find gives the N/S or E/W distinction:

Quote
The Interstate route marker is a red, white, and blue shield, carrying the word "Interstate", the State name, and the route number. Officials of AASHTO developed the procedure for numbering the routes. Major Interstate routes are designated by one- or two-digit numbers. Routes with odd numbers run north and south, while even numbered run east and west. For north-south routes, the lowest numbers begin in the west, while the lowest numbered east-west routes are in the south. By this method, Interstate Route 5 (I-5) runs north-south along the west coast, while I-10 lies east-west along the southern border.

Also worth noting from that page is that they do not consider I-40, I-70, or I-25 to be "transcontinental" highways. I feel like a lot of people in the road community think of some of those as "close enough".


EDIT: whoa, this is apparently my 5000th post. I feel old.

Rothman

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Makes me wonder where that definition is codified.  I think the popular YouTube video going around makes that distinction, but I'd like to see a link from FHWA or AASHTO that makes that distinction.

I found a FHWA page that makes that distinction... but for US highways, and also clarifies that US 2 should be considered on equal standing with the x0 routes:

Quote
For the principal east-west routes, James assigned two-digit numbers ending in zero. For the principal north-south routes, he assigned numbers ending in 1 or 5. With these base routes numbered, the remaining routes could be numbered accordingly. He thought three-digit numbers, which he considered inevitable, should be assigned to short sections, cutoffs, and crossovers. Logical alternate routes should be given the number of the principal line of traffic, plus 100. Thus, under his original scheme, an alternate for U.S. 55 would be U.S. 155.

On September 25, the Committee of Five met in the Jefferson Hotel in St. Louis to complete the numbering plan. The committee followed James' concept. Transcontinental and principal east-west routes were assigned multiples of 10, with the lowest number along the Canadian border (U.S. 2, chosen to avoid a U.S. 0). The principal north-south routes were given numbers ending in 1, with U.S. 1 along the East Coast. The north-south routes of considerable length but secondary importance were given numbers ending in 5.

For interstate highway numbering, the only FHWA source I was able to find gives the N/S or E/W distinction:

Quote
The Interstate route marker is a red, white, and blue shield, carrying the word "Interstate", the State name, and the route number. Officials of AASHTO developed the procedure for numbering the routes. Major Interstate routes are designated by one- or two-digit numbers. Routes with odd numbers run north and south, while even numbered run east and west. For north-south routes, the lowest numbers begin in the west, while the lowest numbered east-west routes are in the south. By this method, Interstate Route 5 (I-5) runs north-south along the west coast, while I-10 lies east-west along the southern border.

Also worth noting from that page is that they do not consider I-40, I-70, or I-25 to be "transcontinental" highways. I feel like a lot of people in the road community think of some of those as "close enough".


EDIT: whoa, this is apparently my 5000th post. I feel old.
The Interstate information is all that is pertinent and meets my expectations.
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Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

 


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