AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)  (Read 46956 times)

The Ghostbuster

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2948
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Madison, WI
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 04:27:57 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #375 on: April 14, 2021, 10:38:21 PM »

That worked! Thanks kernals12.
Logged

In_Correct

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 454
  • Safety > Danger ... Road Buffets > Road Diets

  • Location: TX
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 11:38:57 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #376 on: April 14, 2021, 10:39:49 PM »

Quote

East End affordable housing project receives approval from Houston city council

April 14, 2021
Updated: April 14, 2021 12:23 p.m.

https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/17/46/37/20867041/3/1200x0.jpg



A piece of vacant land (center) owned by the Houston Housing Authority on sits across the street from new housing developments and original older houses in Second Ward on Tuesday, April 13, 2021, in Houston. City Council on Wednesday OK’d plans for the first phase of what will be a 900-unit mostly affordable housing complex.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer

City Council on Wednesday approved a 400-unit affordable housing project in the East End, clearing the way for construction despite concerns raised about potential environmental health risks at the property.

The project at 800 Middle St. will house low-income residents, including those expected to be displaced from the nearby Clayton Homes housing complex that the Texas Department of Transportation plans to demolish to make way for its expansion of Interstate 45. The Houston Housing Authority, which is overseeing the project along with an Ohio-based private developer, sold Clayton Homes to the state transportation agency in 2019 and used a portion of the proceeds to buy the land at 800 Middle St.

The land is located east of downtown along the southern shore of Buffalo Bayou, less than a mile from Clayton Homes.

City Council approved the project on a unanimous vote, without any discussion.

About three-quarters of the 400 proposed units will be for households earning up to 60 percent of the area median income, defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as roughly $45,000 for a family of four. The remainder would be for households with incomes up to 30 percent of the area median income. Housing officials ultimately plan to build 900 units at the site, some of which would be offered at market rate.

The project will be partially subsidized through a federal tax credit for low-income housing projects funded by tax-exempt bonds.

The proposed development has come under scrutiny from local developer Alan Atkinson, who has filed a federal lawsuit in which he argues the property is unsuitable for development due to its location next to a lead processing facility and its prior use as an ash landfill site for city garbage incinerators decades ago. Atkinson has alleged the previous landowner and the city housing authority misrepresented the environmental status of the land in inspection reports submitted to state and federal officials.

The city has denied Atkinson’s charges, arguing in court filings that the land had no “known environmental issues” until storm weather caused part of the property to erode along the bank of Buffalo Bayou in early 2020.

Those who support the project, including Councilmember Karla Cisneros, say the new apartment complex will provide needed affordable housing in a gentrifying area of the city. They also argue it will help ensure Clayton Homes residents are relocated nearby their current residences.

jasper.scherer@chron.com


They should have not built that subdivision to begin with if they knew it would be flooded all the time.
Logged
Drive Safely. :sombrero: Ride Safely. And Build More Roads, Rails, And Bridges. :coffee:

kernals12

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1387
  • Love highways and cars. Hate public transit.

  • Location: Suburban Boston
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 09:34:31 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #377 on: April 14, 2021, 11:12:19 PM »

Quote

East End affordable housing project receives approval from Houston city council

April 14, 2021
Updated: April 14, 2021 12:23 p.m.

https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/17/46/37/20867041/3/1200x0.jpg



A piece of vacant land (center) owned by the Houston Housing Authority on sits across the street from new housing developments and original older houses in Second Ward on Tuesday, April 13, 2021, in Houston. City Council on Wednesday OK’d plans for the first phase of what will be a 900-unit mostly affordable housing complex.

Mark Mulligan, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer

City Council on Wednesday approved a 400-unit affordable housing project in the East End, clearing the way for construction despite concerns raised about potential environmental health risks at the property.

The project at 800 Middle St. will house low-income residents, including those expected to be displaced from the nearby Clayton Homes housing complex that the Texas Department of Transportation plans to demolish to make way for its expansion of Interstate 45. The Houston Housing Authority, which is overseeing the project along with an Ohio-based private developer, sold Clayton Homes to the state transportation agency in 2019 and used a portion of the proceeds to buy the land at 800 Middle St.

The land is located east of downtown along the southern shore of Buffalo Bayou, less than a mile from Clayton Homes.

City Council approved the project on a unanimous vote, without any discussion.

About three-quarters of the 400 proposed units will be for households earning up to 60 percent of the area median income, defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as roughly $45,000 for a family of four. The remainder would be for households with incomes up to 30 percent of the area median income. Housing officials ultimately plan to build 900 units at the site, some of which would be offered at market rate.

The project will be partially subsidized through a federal tax credit for low-income housing projects funded by tax-exempt bonds.

The proposed development has come under scrutiny from local developer Alan Atkinson, who has filed a federal lawsuit in which he argues the property is unsuitable for development due to its location next to a lead processing facility and its prior use as an ash landfill site for city garbage incinerators decades ago. Atkinson has alleged the previous landowner and the city housing authority misrepresented the environmental status of the land in inspection reports submitted to state and federal officials.

The city has denied Atkinson’s charges, arguing in court filings that the land had no “known environmental issues” until storm weather caused part of the property to erode along the bank of Buffalo Bayou in early 2020.

Those who support the project, including Councilmember Karla Cisneros, say the new apartment complex will provide needed affordable housing in a gentrifying area of the city. They also argue it will help ensure Clayton Homes residents are relocated nearby their current residences.

jasper.scherer@chron.com


They should have not built that subdivision to begin with if they knew it would be flooded all the time.


Builders, whether private or public sector, are very often not concerned with the consequences of their actions.
Logged

kernals12

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1387
  • Love highways and cars. Hate public transit.

  • Location: Suburban Boston
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 09:34:31 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #378 on: April 14, 2021, 11:19:21 PM »

The environmental impact statement says Segment 1 will displace 23,000 jobs. How's that? There doesn't like that many businesses in the right of way.
Logged

silverback1065

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3391
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Indianapolis
  • Last Login: April 16, 2021, 03:25:01 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #379 on: April 15, 2021, 08:08:27 AM »

Quote
(older Prius batteries tend to outlast the car itself, for example)

This is a problem. Automobiles are supposed to last for ever. Bus Grease Monkey has proven that.

The Battery Electric Rail Vehicle has been around since the early 1800s. Diesel Electric has been around since the early 1900s. Even Regenerative Braking has been around in the Turbine Locomotives.

So Called Renewable Energy should be used for certain types of Rail systems, not Automobiles. Diesel Electric is best for Automobiles, certain types of Rail systems ... and in occasional types of Rail systems it is best for them to switch back to Turbine.

Electric cars are ascendant and will eventually replace gas powered cars.
Logged

bwana39

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 488
  • Location: Near Texarkana TX
  • Last Login: Today at 12:03:36 AM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #380 on: April 15, 2021, 10:55:34 AM »

Quote
(older Prius batteries tend to outlast the car itself, for example)

This is a problem. Automobiles are supposed to last for ever. Bus Grease Monkey has proven that.

The Battery Electric Rail Vehicle has been around since the early 1800s. Diesel Electric has been around since the early 1900s. Even Regenerative Braking has been around in the Turbine Locomotives.

So Called Renewable Energy should be used for certain types of Rail systems, not Automobiles. Diesel Electric is best for Automobiles, certain types of Rail systems ... and in occasional types of Rail systems it is best for them to switch back to Turbine.

Electric cars are ascendant and will eventually replace gas powered cars.


Electric cars. In some cases that means COAL Powered cars?   Manufacturing these cars is far from environmentally neutral.  Disposal of the batteries MAY wind up a bigger environmental dilemma than EVERYTHING in an internal combustion powered car, truck, or bus: INCLUDING the emissions.

While it would immediately lessen the carbon monoxide emissions, what does it leave down the line of if there is a problem.  In moment, Nuclear power is the cleanest, most efficient, and reliable power generation. If there is a problem, the long-term outlook is not as rosy.  Battery operated cars may have the same iffy outlook as an old used up Nuclear Power Plant.
Logged

The Ghostbuster

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2948
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Madison, WI
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 04:27:57 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #381 on: April 15, 2021, 08:42:48 PM »

Let's not turn this thread into a electric car vs. gas powered debate like what happened in the New York thread in the Northeast Regional Board. Stick to the subject's headline: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild). Much obliged.
Logged

silverback1065

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3391
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Indianapolis
  • Last Login: April 16, 2021, 03:25:01 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #382 on: April 16, 2021, 02:08:18 PM »

Quote
(older Prius batteries tend to outlast the car itself, for example)

This is a problem. Automobiles are supposed to last for ever. Bus Grease Monkey has proven that.

The Battery Electric Rail Vehicle has been around since the early 1800s. Diesel Electric has been around since the early 1900s. Even Regenerative Braking has been around in the Turbine Locomotives.

So Called Renewable Energy should be used for certain types of Rail systems, not Automobiles. Diesel Electric is best for Automobiles, certain types of Rail systems ... and in occasional types of Rail systems it is best for them to switch back to Turbine.

Electric cars are ascendant and will eventually replace gas powered cars.


Electric cars. In some cases that means COAL Powered cars?   Manufacturing these cars is far from environmentally neutral.  Disposal of the batteries MAY wind up a bigger environmental dilemma than EVERYTHING in an internal combustion powered car, truck, or bus: INCLUDING the emissions.

While it would immediately lessen the carbon monoxide emissions, what does it leave down the line of if there is a problem.  In moment, Nuclear power is the cleanest, most efficient, and reliable power generation. If there is a problem, the long-term outlook is not as rosy.  Battery operated cars may have the same iffy outlook as an old used up Nuclear Power Plant.

not all power is generated by coal. and actually now very little is by coal, it is mostly natural gas. eventually most of our power will be from renewables. your point about disposal being a problem is fallacious, you are pretending electric cars were promised to have little to no impact on the environment, that is simply not true. Also nuclear has a big problem of what to do with the radioactive waste it creates.
Logged

silverback1065

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3391
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Indianapolis
  • Last Login: April 16, 2021, 03:25:01 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #383 on: April 16, 2021, 02:31:19 PM »

i recently saw an article about a study being done to replace US 75/I-345 in Dallas by upgrading several north/south streets as blvds. Why are woke urbanists obsessed with blvds? they tout them like they are the end all be all to solve traffic problems in downtowns. in reality they turn into crappy over clogged roads that are hard to cross as a ped like West St. in downtown Indianapolis.
Logged

kernals12

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1387
  • Love highways and cars. Hate public transit.

  • Location: Suburban Boston
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 09:34:31 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #384 on: April 16, 2021, 03:19:51 PM »

i recently saw an article about a study being done to replace US 75/I-345 in Dallas by upgrading several north/south streets as blvds. Why are woke urbanists obsessed with blvds? they tout them like they are the end all be all to solve traffic problems in downtowns. in reality they turn into crappy over clogged roads that are hard to cross as a ped like West St. in downtown Indianapolis.

They like the boulevards of Paris (apparently unaware that in order to build them, Haussman wiped out working class communities on a scale that would make Robert Moses blush)
Logged

In_Correct

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 454
  • Safety > Danger ... Road Buffets > Road Diets

  • Location: TX
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 11:38:57 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #385 on: April 16, 2021, 04:16:42 PM »

Urbanists like to pretend that they are poor and displaced. The area not far from The Unfinished Corridor Bridge are not low income. They see Road Diets as "Friendly" and since that area is known for parties ... they want to block off the traffic and throw things at cars.
Logged
Drive Safely. :sombrero: Ride Safely. And Build More Roads, Rails, And Bridges. :coffee:

bwana39

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 488
  • Location: Near Texarkana TX
  • Last Login: Today at 12:03:36 AM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #386 on: April 16, 2021, 05:22:49 PM »

Quote
(older Prius batteries tend to outlast the car itself, for example)

This is a problem. Automobiles are supposed to last for ever. Bus Grease Monkey has proven that.

The Battery Electric Rail Vehicle has been around since the early 1800s. Diesel Electric has been around since the early 1900s. Even Regenerative Braking has been around in the Turbine Locomotives.

So Called Renewable Energy should be used for certain types of Rail systems, not Automobiles. Diesel Electric is best for Automobiles, certain types of Rail systems ... and in occasional types of Rail systems it is best for them to switch back to Turbine.

Electric cars are ascendant and will eventually replace gas powered cars.


Electric cars. In some cases that means COAL Powered cars?   Manufacturing these cars is far from environmentally neutral.  Disposal of the batteries MAY wind up a bigger environmental dilemma than EVERYTHING in an internal combustion powered car, truck, or bus: INCLUDING the emissions.

While it would immediately lessen the carbon monoxide emissions, what does it leave down the line of if there is a problem.  In moment, Nuclear power is the cleanest, most efficient, and reliable power generation. If there is a problem, the long-term outlook is not as rosy.  Battery operated cars may have the same iffy outlook as an old used up Nuclear Power Plant.

not all power is generated by coal. and actually now very little is by coal, it is mostly natural gas. eventually most of our power will be from renewables. your point about disposal being a problem is fallacious, you are pretending electric cars were promised to have little to no impact on the environment, that is simply not true. Also nuclear has a big problem of what to do with the radioactive waste it creates.

As to the coal. I said SOME. It is not as you said very little. It is around 20%. While that is half of what it was less than a decade ago, it is still significant. In some states, coal still is over 50% of the electricity generated. Ironically, greater use of electric cars MIGHT actually increase the utilization of coal as much of our coal generation is being idled first. So as demand peaks, coal burning increases. That was only a MINOR point.

The renewals have ramped up to close to 20%, but is far more expensive than fossil fuels.

you are pretending electric cars were promised to have little to no impact on the environment. That is the inference. Not mine, but those of proponents of battery electric cars now.  Today: A gasoline powered car is cleaner to produce than a plug-in electric or a gas electric hybrid.  There is debate on the long-run weather the way the seeming environmental advantages to electrical generation fueling the cars actually fully offsets the cradle to grave environmental issues of the electric powered cars.    I am not suggesting we will never overcome this. It may actually happen sooner than later. The point is we aren't there yet.

Yes nuclear waste is a major concern. So is battery waste, plastic waste, and even how to best deal with the production of non-ferrous metals that have a larger role in electric cars.  Plastics are still mostly made from petroleum. 
« Last Edit: April 17, 2021, 09:15:40 AM by bwana39 »
Logged

In_Correct

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 454
  • Safety > Danger ... Road Buffets > Road Diets

  • Location: TX
  • Last Login: April 17, 2021, 11:38:57 PM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #387 on: April 16, 2021, 09:49:39 PM »

Many people expect their cars to be unreasonably fast. If a Battery Electric Automobile loses much of its power when it falls below 50%, there is a risk for inattentive speeding car drivers to crash into it. These issues must be resolved before Battery Electric Automobiles be come wide spread.


The trains from Cabview Holland Dutch Railways, for example in the Grand Tour Of Holland video, are Battery Electric. For some time the power lines were missing yet the train still operated. How ever, it needed to connect to power eventually.

Installing this system would require a Solar Road Surface and probably a Wireless Charging System. The wireless charging system is not recommended. The cars would need Pantographs.

But first there would have to be maintenance on the existing road surfaces and infrastructure.
Logged
Drive Safely. :sombrero: Ride Safely. And Build More Roads, Rails, And Bridges. :coffee:

bwana39

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 488
  • Location: Near Texarkana TX
  • Last Login: Today at 12:03:36 AM
Re: North Houston Highway Improvement Project (includes downtown rebuild)
« Reply #388 on: April 17, 2021, 02:34:51 PM »

i recently saw an article about a study being done to replace US 75/I-345 in Dallas by upgrading several north/south streets as blvds. Why are woke urbanists obsessed with blvds? they tout them like they are the end all be all to solve traffic problems in downtowns. in reality they turn into crappy over clogged roads that are hard to cross as a ped like West St. in downtown Indianapolis.

Even in Dallas. Jefferson Boulevard USED to be what they think they see in the future with a boulevard downtown. Look at it now, The freeway did not come anywhere close. Drive down Jefferson today. It has activity, but not the vibrant walkability they keep promoting.

This is I have said multiple times. It is about creating new land for development.  I am not going to say that it will not create short-term growth. The west end was like this for a couple of decades. Mid-town was the place to be for a while. Sure something new may make a short-term boom, but in the long run getting rid of this freeway (Whether you are talking about I-345 or the Pierce elevated) creates permanent traffic disruption for a temporary boon.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.