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Tucson Freeways

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andy3175:
Starting a thread on Tucson highways and freeways, of which there are only 2 Interstate-grade freeways (I-10 and I-19). This article discusses the plans for Aviation Parkway (AZ 210) and the Sonoran Corridor in SE Tucson, but it also mentions the potential need for a crosstown freeway traveling from east to west across Tucson. Opinions in the article naturally extend in favor and opposition to considering such a route, which would be a $3B endeavor according to the article.

http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/28939827/traffic-troubles-does-tucson-need-a-crosstown-freeway


--- Quote ---As Tucson's population grows, what plans are in place for crosstown roads to cut down your commute? We've debated potential ideas for decades, and though past proposals for crosstown freeways, parkways, or even outer loops have failed, questions remain. As the city of Tucson expands east, how will our road system change with it? ...

Clearly the thought isn't new, so why don't we have an east to west route yet?

We saw a proposal for a crosstown parkway in 1984, as well as ideas for a loop around the city in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In these cases, it came down to a lack of money and designs were defeated at the ballot box.

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation and Regional Transportation Authority, it would cost more than $3 billion to build an actual crosstown freeway now. ...

tate Route 210, also known as Aviation Parkway, will eventually change for commuters. Currently, it spans from Golf Links Road west of South Swan Road on the east side to the eastern edge of downtown Tucson at East Broadway Boulevard.

ADOT is starting Phase 2 of a traffic study which includes expansion of the parkway. The parkway could eventually go all the way to I-10 on the west side, while the eastern extension has yet to be planned. ADOT officials say this would really make a difference for drivers.

"This would relieve a lot of traffic on I-10 that is heading to downtown Tucson," Krugel said. "Because they would have another option to get downtown by taking State Route 210, which would be a free-flowing highway."

They have money set aside now for the right of way fees, but no design or construction fees are designated, which means any kind of change here is still years away.

Plans are also in place for The Sonoran Corridor. Once built, this road will connect I-19 at Pima Mine Road to I-10 at Rita Road, easing congestion around Raytheon's facilities. It should cut about 20 minutes out of the southeast side commute, according to Pima County officials. ...

The Sonoran Corridor will also connect traffic from about 18 roads in the area with about 304,025 cars traveling on them, according to Raytheon and Pima Association of Governments.

"We're attempting to find ways to make sure we minimize congestion at the crossings, which is where the two come together," Pima County Director of Strategic Planning John Moffatt said. "As well as divert traffic and also make it easier to get to work."

Designs for this corridor are slightly further along and they should have it built in the next five to 10 years. The expected cost exceeds $600 million. The county will initially build this as a surface street, but Moffatt tells me they are ultimately looking at a four-lane highway design.
--- End quote ---

nexus73:
Funny to think that I see so many local/regional tax increases pass in California where congestion is Obvious with a capital O but a growing place like Tucson can't be bothered with building the needed infrastructure as well as paying the piper.  It looks like all that can be done is to let things get so bad that the people scream for ice cream, then they'll be ready to pay.  Those "pay me now or pay me later" commercials must not have resonated with the people who live in the only walled city in the US of A. 

Rick

dfwmapper:

--- Quote from: nexus73 on May 11, 2015, 12:57:57 AM ---Funny to think that I see so many local/regional tax increases pass in California where congestion is Obvious with a capital O but a growing place like Tucson can't be bothered with building the needed infrastructure as well as paying the piper.  It looks like all that can be done is to let things get so bad that the people scream for ice cream, then they'll be ready to pay.  Those "pay me now or pay me later" commercials must not have resonated with the people who live in the only walled city in the US of A. 

Rick

--- End quote ---
Pima County did pass a 1/2 cent sales tax increase in 2006 to pay for transportation. It has funded hundreds of projects including widening of many roads, building of new interchanges on I-10, eliminating at-grade rail crossings, improving bus service, and the streetcar line that opened last year. But please, continue telling us about how they refuse to pay.

nexus73:

--- Quote from: dfwmapper on May 11, 2015, 03:33:41 AM ---
--- Quote from: nexus73 on May 11, 2015, 12:57:57 AM ---Funny to think that I see so many local/regional tax increases pass in California where congestion is Obvious with a capital O but a growing place like Tucson can't be bothered with building the needed infrastructure as well as paying the piper.  It looks like all that can be done is to let things get so bad that the people scream for ice cream, then they'll be ready to pay.  Those "pay me now or pay me later" commercials must not have resonated with the people who live in the only walled city in the US of A. 

Rick

--- End quote ---
Pima County did pass a 1/2 cent sales tax increase in 2006 to pay for transportation. It has funded hundreds of projects including widening of many roads, building of new interchanges on I-10, eliminating at-grade rail crossings, improving bus service, and the streetcar line that opened last year. But please, continue telling us about how they refuse to pay.

--- End quote ---

"We saw a proposal for a crosstown parkway in 1984, as well as ideas for a loop around the city in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In these cases, it came down to a lack of money and designs were defeated at the ballot box."

Satisfied?

Rick

Henry:
Due to the fact that the I-710 proposal was shot down decades ago and Tucson's anti-freeway sentiment, I find it hard to believe that any freeway proposals have come about since then.

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