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Author Topic: Nevada  (Read 32578 times)

Plutonic Panda

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #75 on: August 11, 2020, 10:15:32 PM »

NDOT will be upgrading 32 of US-95 in NYE county to the tune of 17 million. Pavement replacement, passing lanes, shoulder improvements, and fiber optic cables are part of of the project.

More info here:

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6330/395?fsiteid=1
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rte66man

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #76 on: August 12, 2020, 03:05:18 PM »

NDOT will be upgrading 32 of US-95 in NYE county to the tune of 17 million. Pavement replacement, passing lanes, shoulder improvements, and fiber optic cables are part of of the project.

More info here:

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6330/395?fsiteid=1

32 inches? 32 yards?
<ducks and runs>
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Sub-Urbanite

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #77 on: August 21, 2020, 12:45:26 PM »

NDOT will be upgrading 32 of US-95 in NYE county to the tune of 17 million. Pavement replacement, passing lanes, shoulder improvements, and fiber optic cables are part of of the project.

More info here:

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6330/395?fsiteid=1

See, I don't get this. Why spend $17 million on this project to essentially rebuild the 2 lane roadway when NDOT knows that it'll be twinning this at some point? Make the extra investment and take it to 4. I'm not saying to give it the full freeway treatment, but this is one stretch where a new alignment is highly unlikely (and would render this investment obsolete anyway).
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skluth

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #78 on: August 21, 2020, 02:49:28 PM »

NDOT will be upgrading 32 of US-95 in NYE county to the tune of 17 million. Pavement replacement, passing lanes, shoulder improvements, and fiber optic cables are part of of the project.

More info here:

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6330/395?fsiteid=1

See, I don't get this. Why spend $17 million on this project to essentially rebuild the 2 lane roadway when NDOT knows that it'll be twinning this at some point? Make the extra investment and take it to 4. I'm not saying to give it the full freeway treatment, but this is one stretch where a new alignment is highly unlikely (and would render this investment obsolete anyway).

This project will be done by next spring. Unless the four-laning is done within the next ten years, this is probably the only improvement on this stretch for the near future. It's not like US 95 is already four lanes to Beatty. Nevada isn't showing much urgency in their desire to complete I-11 given the Alternatives Analysis from a couple years ago states, "Construction of the roughly 450-mile long future I-11 could be phased over future decades as environmental impact reviews are completed and funding is prioritized." (Emphasized text mine) This project could easily be twenty years in the past by the time NDOT gets around to making this stretch four lanes, and probably to full freeway at that time. A parallel road bed for 32 miles is considerably more expensive than $17M and might face considerably more environmental opposition (a new freeway anywhere grabs considerably more attention than a simple highway improvement).
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Sub-Urbanite

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #79 on: August 21, 2020, 06:00:42 PM »

NDOT will be upgrading 32 of US-95 in NYE county to the tune of 17 million. Pavement replacement, passing lanes, shoulder improvements, and fiber optic cables are part of of the project.

More info here:

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6330/395?fsiteid=1

See, I don't get this. Why spend $17 million on this project to essentially rebuild the 2 lane roadway when NDOT knows that it'll be twinning this at some point? Make the extra investment and take it to 4. I'm not saying to give it the full freeway treatment, but this is one stretch where a new alignment is highly unlikely (and would render this investment obsolete anyway).

This project will be done by next spring. Unless the four-laning is done within the next ten years, this is probably the only improvement on this stretch for the near future. It's not like US 95 is already four lanes to Beatty. Nevada isn't showing much urgency in their desire to complete I-11 given the Alternatives Analysis from a couple years ago states, "Construction of the roughly 450-mile long future I-11 could be phased over future decades as environmental impact reviews are completed and funding is prioritized." (Emphasized text mine) This project could easily be twenty years in the past by the time NDOT gets around to making this stretch four lanes, and probably to full freeway at that time. A parallel road bed for 32 miles is considerably more expensive than $17M and might face considerably more environmental opposition (a new freeway anywhere grabs considerably more attention than a simple highway improvement).

True, but if they're following the ADOT approach, then piecemeal twinning is the path to victory. Remember, the first segment of the US 93 twinning between I-40 and US 60 – which at times was called wasteful – started around 25 years ago.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #80 on: August 21, 2020, 11:05:52 PM »

NDOT will be upgrading 32 of US-95 in NYE county to the tune of 17 million. Pavement replacement, passing lanes, shoulder improvements, and fiber optic cables are part of of the project.

More info here:

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6330/395?fsiteid=1

See, I don't get this. Why spend $17 million on this project to essentially rebuild the 2 lane roadway when NDOT knows that it'll be twinning this at some point? Make the extra investment and take it to 4. I'm not saying to give it the full freeway treatment, but this is one stretch where a new alignment is highly unlikely (and would render this investment obsolete anyway).

This project will be done by next spring. Unless the four-laning is done within the next ten years, this is probably the only improvement on this stretch for the near future. It's not like US 95 is already four lanes to Beatty. Nevada isn't showing much urgency in their desire to complete I-11 given the Alternatives Analysis from a couple years ago states, "Construction of the roughly 450-mile long future I-11 could be phased over future decades as environmental impact reviews are completed and funding is prioritized." (Emphasized text mine) This project could easily be twenty years in the past by the time NDOT gets around to making this stretch four lanes, and probably to full freeway at that time. A parallel road bed for 32 miles is considerably more expensive than $17M and might face considerably more environmental opposition (a new freeway anywhere grabs considerably more attention than a simple highway improvement).

True, but if they're following the ADOT approach, then piecemeal twinning is the path to victory. Remember, the first segment of the US 93 twinning between I-40 and US 60 – which at times was called wasteful – started around 25 years ago.
I concur that it wouldn't make sense to start doing expressway-style upgrades instead of a project like this. $17m for what is amounting to safety improvements and minor resurfacing of 32 miles of existing two-lane highway seems like a reasonable investment at this time. It'll probably be a lengthy amount of time (measured in decades) before this stretch sees significant upgrades.

If they were going to twin a rural stretch of US 95, this would not be the stretch to do it. Based on my observations over time, Beatty to Tonopah segment this project lies in tends to have the least traffic over the four major segments of the entire Vegas-to-Reno drive. If anything, four-laning from Mercury to Beatty would be the first step and a reasonable segment of independent utility.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

Kniwt

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #81 on: October 21, 2020, 02:49:52 PM »

The Reno Gazette-Journal reports that a production-car speed record has been set on NV 160 near Pahrump: 331mph.
https://www.rgj.com/story/sports/2020/10/20/production-car-sets-world-speed-record-road-near-las-vegas/5998947002/

Quote
A car built in Washington, that took 10 years to design, engineer and build, set a speed record on highway 160 in Southern Nevada between Las Vegas and Pahrump on Oct. 10. The car, built by SSC North America and called a 'Tuatara' averaged 316 mph on its two runs that day.

The car driven by Oliver Webb, 29, hit 301 mph on its first run, then, an hour later, hit 331 mph, for a 316 average.

Two runs completed within an hour, in opposite directions, are required to establish a record and the average is used.

The seven-mile stretch of highway was shut down for the attempt.
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nexus73

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #82 on: October 21, 2020, 08:40:10 PM »

The Reno Gazette-Journal reports that a production-car speed record has been set on NV 160 near Pahrump: 331mph.
https://www.rgj.com/story/sports/2020/10/20/production-car-sets-world-speed-record-road-near-las-vegas/5998947002/

Quote
A car built in Washington, that took 10 years to design, engineer and build, set a speed record on highway 160 in Southern Nevada between Las Vegas and Pahrump on Oct. 10. The car, built by SSC North America and called a 'Tuatara' averaged 316 mph on its two runs that day.

The car driven by Oliver Webb, 29, hit 301 mph on its first run, then, an hour later, hit 331 mph, for a 316 average.

Two runs completed within an hour, in opposite directions, are required to establish a record and the average is used.

The seven-mile stretch of highway was shut down for the attempt.


That is what one could call rapid transit!

Rick
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TheGrassGuy

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #83 on: October 23, 2020, 05:50:28 PM »

Is NV-781 signed? I'm making a list of shortest state routes in each state, and was kind of surprised to learn that NV-822 was indeed signed.
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gonealookin

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #84 on: October 23, 2020, 06:53:06 PM »

Is NV-781 signed? I'm making a list of shortest state routes in each state, and was kind of surprised to learn that NV-822 was indeed signed.

Wow, that's digging deep to find NV 781.  I'm pretty sure I'll never drive that one.

If I had to guess I'd say it might be marked with California-style white paddles.  That's the case in my area with NV 705 (a former alignment of US 50 that dips into Douglas County but only serves properties in Carson City, so Douglas County didn't want it).  Also, westbound NV 760 is marked with a shield as it leaves US 50, but the only marking eastbound is a white paddle at its west end.
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TheGrassGuy

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #85 on: October 23, 2020, 06:57:01 PM »

Is NV-781 signed? I'm making a list of shortest state routes in each state, and was kind of surprised to learn that NV-822 was indeed signed.

Wow, that's digging deep to find NV 781.  I'm pretty sure I'll never drive that one.

If I had to guess I'd say it might be marked with California-style white paddles.  That's the case in my area with NV 705 (a former alignment of US 50 that dips into Douglas County but only serves properties in Carson City, so Douglas County didn't want it).  Also, westbound NV 760 is marked with a shield as it leaves US 50, but the only marking eastbound is a white paddle at its west end.

You mean these things? Those don't really count. NV-822 is signed the real way.

There's a reason why NY reference routes are considered "unsigned", even though they have similar markings that are greener and smaller.
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US 89

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #86 on: October 24, 2020, 01:22:46 AM »

Corco's website shows there is at least one postmile:

http://corcohighways.org/?p=9921933

TheGrassGuy

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #87 on: October 24, 2020, 11:49:41 AM »

Corco's website shows there is at least one postmile:

http://corcohighways.org/?p=9921933

By "signed", I mean an actual shield, not just a postmile or whatever.

In NJ, they've started adding postmiles everywhere obsessively around 2017 or so. Even on hitherto unsigned routes, such as NJ-13 (a bridge) and NJ-167 (a former alignment of US-9 with a gap due to a long-demolished bridge that's now hardly anything but a dirt road).

If a route is only marked on postmiles or other similar markers (such as NV-705, the NY reference roads, or the two in NJ I just mentioned), I don't consider them to be "signed".
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #88 on: October 24, 2020, 01:18:57 PM »

It's highly doubtful that SR 781 is signed, given that the route solely consists of an NDOT-maintained bridge along a dirt road in the middle of nowhere.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

gonealookin

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #89 on: November 24, 2020, 07:57:34 PM »

In my area, NDOT will be removing a number of the "Prepare To STOP When Flashing" overhead sign installations in the next month or so, replacing them with continuous flashers or simple static "Signal Ahead" signs.  This is apparently as a result of studies that say "Yellow light means step on the gas, and the flashing lights mean the signal ahead is about to turn yellow, so step on the gas even harder."

Quote
Known as advance signal warning systems, the yellow signs are placed ahead of certain traffic signals to draw attention to the signal ahead. Some advance signal warning signs contain lights which continuously flash. Others begin flashing when the traffic signal ahead readies to turn yellow and red, allowing drivers time to prepare to stop in advance of the signal. This can lead drivers to unsafely speed up to "beat the light," potentially leading to crashes.

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6590/395

The installations being removed are mostly on 4-lane highways with speed limits between 45-55 mph.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #90 on: November 25, 2020, 11:54:03 AM »

In my area, NDOT will be removing a number of the "Prepare To STOP When Flashing" overhead sign installations in the next month or so, replacing them with continuous flashers or simple static "Signal Ahead" signs.  This is apparently as a result of studies that say "Yellow light means step on the gas, and the flashing lights mean the signal ahead is about to turn yellow, so step on the gas even harder."

Quote
Known as advance signal warning systems, the yellow signs are placed ahead of certain traffic signals to draw attention to the signal ahead. Some advance signal warning signs contain lights which continuously flash. Others begin flashing when the traffic signal ahead readies to turn yellow and red, allowing drivers time to prepare to stop in advance of the signal. This can lead drivers to unsafely speed up to "beat the light," potentially leading to crashes.

https://www.nevadadot.com/Home/Components/News/News/6590/395

The installations being removed are mostly on 4-lane highways with speed limits between 45-55 mph.

I had forgotten about this study; thanks for pointing it out.

It's true the "prepare to stop when flashing" signs do prompt people to speed up to beat the light. And I do think some use of these has been a bit unwarranted at times (many of the ones along Pyramid Highway are being removed or converted to static/passive systems).

I've sometimes thought that the active systems should instead flash only when the signal is already red or on onset of yellow, instead of when the signal is preparing to change from green to yellow—seems like that would lessen the "beat the light" mentality.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

Kniwt

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #91 on: November 25, 2020, 12:32:45 PM »

"Yellow light means step on the gas, and the flashing lights mean the signal ahead is about to turn yellow, so step on the gas even harder."

But pedestrian countdown signals often perform the same function for motorists, and with much more accuracy. (Excluding the cases where the green duration is longer than the walk duration.) I don't recall seeing ped signals along US 395 near Minden, but I suspect Pyramid Highway has lots of them.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #92 on: November 26, 2020, 10:33:10 AM »

"Yellow light means step on the gas, and the flashing lights mean the signal ahead is about to turn yellow, so step on the gas even harder."

But pedestrian countdown signals often perform the same function for motorists, and with much more accuracy. (Excluding the cases where the green duration is longer than the walk duration.) I don't recall seeing ped signals along US 395 near Minden, but I suspect Pyramid Highway has lots of them.

True, but the pedestrian countdown signals are at the intersection itself and off to the side (not always visible depending on traffic), so the amount of time and distance that they function as a "step on it" indicator to drivers is relatively small. Compare to the advance signal warning system installations which are often several hundred feet upstream of a signal and designed to be seen by all drivers, so they can function as a "step on it" indicator from a much further distance.

There aren't ped signals on US 395 north of Minden since that's rural divided highway. But there are ped signals along most of the Pyramid Highway locations listed since these are all still fairly urban (despite that there isn't much ped activity out there).
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

Plutonic Panda

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #93 on: November 26, 2020, 01:57:37 PM »

"Yellow light means step on the gas, and the flashing lights mean the signal ahead is about to turn yellow, so step on the gas even harder."

But pedestrian countdown signals often perform the same function for motorists, and with much more accuracy. (Excluding the cases where the green duration is longer than the walk duration.) I don't recall seeing ped signals along US 395 near Minden, but I suspect Pyramid Highway has lots of them.

I could be wrong but I seem to recall a country that actually has countdown timers for motorists at signalized intersections.
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stevashe

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #94 on: December 27, 2020, 08:49:03 PM »

I could be wrong but I seem to recall a country that actually has countdown timers for motorists at signalized intersections.


Taiwan has them, but they're displayed during red lights and count down to when it will turn green, not the other way around.
https://goo.gl/maps/4DeDMhP3Q9z9Z5sa9
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compdude787

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #95 on: January 04, 2021, 04:38:02 PM »

I could be wrong but I seem to recall a country that actually has countdown timers for motorists at signalized intersections.


Taiwan has them, but they're displayed during red lights and count down to when it will turn green, not the other way around.
https://goo.gl/maps/4DeDMhP3Q9z9Z5sa9

That's actually a great idea!

pderocco

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #96 on: January 05, 2021, 09:44:56 PM »

I could be wrong but I seem to recall a country that actually has countdown timers for motorists at signalized intersections.


Taiwan has them, but they're displayed during red lights and count down to when it will turn green, not the other way around.
https://goo.gl/maps/4DeDMhP3Q9z9Z5sa9

That's actually a great idea!

Don'tcha just look at the WALK/DON'T WALK signal going the other way?
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stevashe

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #97 on: January 08, 2021, 01:10:23 AM »

I could be wrong but I seem to recall a country that actually has countdown timers for motorists at signalized intersections.


Taiwan has them, but they're displayed during red lights and count down to when it will turn green, not the other way around.
https://goo.gl/maps/4DeDMhP3Q9z9Z5sa9

That's actually a great idea!

Don'tcha just look at the WALK/DON'T WALK signal going the other way?

You can't see that unless you're the first, maybe second, car in line though.
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skluth

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #98 on: January 08, 2021, 05:42:57 PM »

I could be wrong but I seem to recall a country that actually has countdown timers for motorists at signalized intersections.


Taiwan has them, but they're displayed during red lights and count down to when it will turn green, not the other way around.
https://goo.gl/maps/4DeDMhP3Q9z9Z5sa9

That's actually a great idea!

Don'tcha just look at the WALK/DON'T WALK signal going the other way?

You can't see that unless you're the first, maybe second, car in line though.

I get what pderocco is talking about because I've done it as well. Unfortunately, it doesn't work at a lot of intersections. I walk a lot locally for exercise. Many Palm Springs intersections will finish counting down and then display DON'T WALK for several seconds before the associated light turns yellow and it's 3-4 seconds before it turns red. They may also give pedestrians a WALK light for a couple seconds before the through street gets their green. (Just observed this again today waiting to cross at Mesquite and Farrell.) I will do it when I'm familiar with how the light works, but I won't even bother if I'm somewhere I don't know well.
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Kniwt

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #99 on: January 23, 2021, 12:25:29 PM »

The Elko Daily Free Press reports that US 93 north of Wells will get some upgrades, but not (yet?) the full four-laning that many want.
https://elkodaily.com/news/local/u-s-93-getting-more-passing-lanes-this-year/article_86fb62e1-5cd9-5bc1-93f2-bacd91d8608a.html

Quote
Nevada Department of Transportation has awarded an $8.8 million contract for the construction of roughly six miles of passing lanes north of Wells on U.S. 93, and Elko County Commissioners have asked NDOT to keep them on as a top priority for the future.

... The north and south passing lanes will be between mileposts 101 and 107 just north of the HD Summit and just north of the turnoff to the Winecup Gamble Ranch, which is in an area where NDOT already has the right of way, he said.

Commissioner Cliff Eklund said the passing lanes planned are needed because “there has been a dramatic increase in traffic” on U.S. 93, with truckers coming from Las Vegas and headed to Idaho. He said there is a need for a larger project.

“I think eastern Elko County feels U.S. 93 is very important, and I suppose you understand it,” Commissioner Wilde Brough told Mortensen. Brough said by phone earlier this week that US. 93 is crucial to economic development in eastern Elko County and “it’s crucial to all of the eastern side of Nevada.”

... Mortensen said NDOT staff also is evaluating U.S. 93 south of Wells and all the way to Las Vegas.
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