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West Virginia Turnpike

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thenetwork:

--- Quote from: SP Cook on March 17, 2013, 02:14:15 PM ---I never did know why they called the ride the "WV Turnpike" (it even had signage from the era when the turnpike had its own route marker).

--- End quote ---

Cedar Point in Sandusky, OH has a "Turnpike" ride of their own, as did Kennywood Amusement Park in Pittsburgh until a few years ago.  At least many of the people who came to those amusement parks drove on or crossed their state's Turnpikes to get there.  I guess they called them turnpikes since they were the first superhighways in their respective areas and the way these tracks would loop over and under themselves, it somewhat resembled a turnpike exit.

I've never seen an amusement park's car track like Camden's in West Virginia where there was no rail in the center of the track to keep the car from straying too far from the center of the "roadway".  Camden's looks like a 1-1/2 lane high speed go-kart track to me.

SP Cook:

--- Quote ---
Funny, the local (Rochester) amusement park is able to keep their wooden roller coasters going just fine.  Why are parts so hard to come by in WV but not NY?

--- End quote ---

Mainly because the company that built Camden Park's went broke in 1973, and only built a few full sized roller coasters anyway (it mostly specialized in children's rides) leaving behind a very limited supply of parts.  In any event the park's finacial condition is such that buying much of anything is out of the question.


--- Quote --- I've never seen an amusement park's car track like Camden's in West Virginia where there was no rail in the center of the track to keep the car from straying too far from the center of the "roadway".  Camden's looks like a 1-1/2 lane high speed go-kart track to me.
--- End quote ---

The design was that you were kept on the track via the guardrails.  The cars were also just wide enough that you could not pass.  But, within that you were really "driving", which was a selling point to kids in that era.

You could bump the car in front of you. 

vdeane:

--- Quote from: amroad17 on March 17, 2013, 07:33:13 PM ---Are you referring to SeaBreeze or Roseland (in Canandaigua)?

Either the park itself really does not want to invest in parts or because the nearest theme/amusement parks are at least 150 miles away for them to "borrow" parts they need.  "Order parts?  What's that?"

--- End quote ---
SeaBreeze.  Roseland is a waterpark and was built within my lifetime, so probably not much within the realm of wooden roller coasters there.

ShawnP:
67 isn't that long ago right?

Might be my birth year.

qguy:
A similar ride operated at Hersheypark (then "Hershey Park") from 1960 to 1972. It was called simply the "Turnpike." I remember riding on it with my father around 1970 or 71. I was eight or nine years old and remember banging back and forth between the outer rails. It was damaged beyond repair by Hurricane Agnes in 1972 and afterward demolished. (Quite a few other rides met the same fate that year.)

Like the ride in this thread, it featured a travel lane with outer guard rails, unlike the typical car ride of today which features a center rail (one of which operates at Hersheypark today in a different location).

A postcard featuring the attraction can be seen here: http://www.playle.com/listing.php?i=APOPKAPCSHOPPE56871&PHPSESSID=7hn5hu88bskojpdia7g9ke4m11

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