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Author Topic: I-95 Widening in North Carolina  (Read 40293 times)

wriddle082

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #225 on: February 13, 2023, 03:49:25 PM »

since im of the pro-toll and pro-privatization camp, i think one user had it better when they said to have tolls at the state borders of I-95 in NC, a 5 buck toll for people taking a vacation to florida was probably better, but have separated lanes for trucks only so that trucks have a free pass while people from the north can just go on paying the 5 bucks, although a 5 buck toll with congestion pricing for the summer time and for christmas/thanksgiving would probably be better for I-95 in NC. it would obviously pay for the maintence long term but it would help more. the only problem with tolls at the state borders is it could lead to some issues with people using a exit just before hitting NC to take a state or US route to cross the NC border free.

Tolling I-95 would be instant political suicide, and privatization anywhere in the state would be political suicide as well (Pat McCrory found that out the hard way).

Amen to that!  And itís a wonder that Thom Tillis is still an elected official at all at this point, seeing that he rammed the I-77 toll lanes through the NC General Assembly to begin with.

Somehow, NC has found the $ to start on the projects that are currently in progress.  Itís a very good start, since itís focusing on the most congested and outdated segments.  Though it is definitely not pleasant to drive through those work zones.  I have found myself utilizing US 13 quite a bit during my regular trips from Columbia, SC up to Hampton Roads.
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LM117

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #226 on: February 14, 2023, 09:58:16 AM »

since im of the pro-toll and pro-privatization camp, i think one user had it better when they said to have tolls at the state borders of I-95 in NC, a 5 buck toll for people taking a vacation to florida was probably better, but have separated lanes for trucks only so that trucks have a free pass while people from the north can just go on paying the 5 bucks, although a 5 buck toll with congestion pricing for the summer time and for christmas/thanksgiving would probably be better for I-95 in NC. it would obviously pay for the maintence long term but it would help more. the only problem with tolls at the state borders is it could lead to some issues with people using a exit just before hitting NC to take a state or US route to cross the NC border free.

Tolling I-95 would be instant political suicide, and privatization anywhere in the state would be political suicide as well (Pat McCrory found that out the hard way).

Amen to that!  And itís a wonder that Thom Tillis is still an elected official at all at this point, seeing that he rammed the I-77 toll lanes through the NC General Assembly to begin with.

NC's political preferences for US Senate and President almost always contradict those for governor. If Tillis had been governor and pushed the I-77 toll lanes, he would've lost like McCrory did.
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architect77

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #227 on: February 16, 2023, 12:49:42 AM »

since im of the pro-toll and pro-privatization camp, i think one user had it better when they said to have tolls at the state borders of I-95 in NC, a 5 buck toll for people taking a vacation to florida was probably better, but have separated lanes for trucks only so that trucks have a free pass while people from the north can just go on paying the 5 bucks, although a 5 buck toll with congestion pricing for the summer time and for christmas/thanksgiving would probably be better for I-95 in NC. it would obviously pay for the maintence long term but it would help more. the only problem with tolls at the state borders is it could lead to some issues with people using a exit just before hitting NC to take a state or US route to cross the NC border free.

Tolling I-95 would be instant political suicide, and privatization anywhere in the state would be political suicide as well (Pat McCrory found that out the hard way).

Amen to that!  And itís a wonder that Thom Tillis is still an elected official at all at this point, seeing that he rammed the I-77 toll lanes through the NC General Assembly to begin with.

NC's political preferences for US Senate and President almost always contradict those for governor. If Tillis had been governor and pushed the I-77 toll lanes, he would've lost like McCrory did.

McCrory partially lost because of the Bathroom Bill nonsense, but also because of I-77, which is an awful all-around deal with no additional free lanes and a prohibition of building new parallel alternatives for 50 years.

The NC Turnpike authority's other tolled roads are generally accepted without much griping.

I-95 border tolls would not be political suicide because it's plainly clear that NC residents aren't being targeted, and out-of-state travelers don't have a problem with a small contribution especially when they see all of the ongoing construction even right now.

The original 95 toll proposal was ridiculous with 5 or so toll locations within the state. That seemed to be especially targeting locals. Fortunately enough federal attention (even Trump's administration) has been given to NC"s stretch of I-95 to give it a boost with reconstruction. The infrastructure bill should give it some more funding to accelerate construction.

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architect77

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #228 on: February 16, 2023, 12:55:21 AM »

since im of the pro-toll and pro-privatization camp, i think one user had it better when they said to have tolls at the state borders of I-95 in NC, a 5 buck toll for people taking a vacation to florida was probably better, but have separated lanes for trucks only so that trucks have a free pass while people from the north can just go on paying the 5 bucks, although a 5 buck toll with congestion pricing for the summer time and for christmas/thanksgiving would probably be better for I-95 in NC. it would obviously pay for the maintence long term but it would help more. the only problem with tolls at the state borders is it could lead to some issues with people using a exit just before hitting NC to take a state or US route to cross the NC border free.

Tolling I-95 would be instant political suicide, and privatization anywhere in the state would be political suicide as well (Pat McCrory found that out the hard way).

Amen to that!  And itís a wonder that Thom Tillis is still an elected official at all at this point, seeing that he rammed the I-77 toll lanes through the NC General Assembly to begin with.

Somehow, NC has found the $ to start on the projects that are currently in progress.  Itís a very good start, since itís focusing on the most congested and outdated segments.  Though it is definitely not pleasant to drive through those work zones.  I have found myself utilizing US 13 quite a bit during my regular trips from Columbia, SC up to Hampton Roads.


I have driven through I-95's work zones from Smithfield to the SC line. It is a breeze and very smooth compared to South Carolina's I-85 widening through Gaffney, SC. That 30 mile construction zone had the same narrow barrier placement but the rough pavement with crowded, fast-moving traffic was just beating my car to death. It was white-knuckle driving for 45 minutes solid.
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sprjus4

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #229 on: February 16, 2023, 01:46:55 AM »

Yeah, in my experience North Carolina has handled its work zones better than South Carolina.

Currently, approximately 50 miles are or will soon be under construction between I-74 and I-40, excluding the Fayetteville "bypass" portion between either end of US-301.

Hopefully, funding can be found to close the "gap" around Fayetteville, where the highway will reduce from 8 to 4 lanes both north and south of the city, along with more 6 to 8 lane widening north of I-40 up towards Smithfield.

The portion north of Smithfield was just recently reconstructed with the mainline section reconstructed with new pavement and a modern concrete median barrier. The interchanges and existing 1950-era bridges are planned to soon be replaced as well, fully modernizing that stretch. It has all been designed with the capability of being expanded to an additional 2 lanes in each direction to the outside in the future.

North of US-301 / Kenly is a less traffic portion, though still warrants 6 lanes during peak travel periods.

South Carolina is planning to widen I-95 north of Florence to the North Carolina state line to 6 lanes I believe, and North Carolina should next be planning the section between I-74 and the South Carolina state line (13 miles). That, in combination with an expanded Fayetteville bypass, north of I-40 to Kenly, and the existing 50 miles under construction, would create approximately 145 miles of continuous 6 to 8-lane interstate highway between I-20 and Kenly. This is all achievable in the next 10 years if funding is allocated properly. It would alleviate the worst parts of I-95, leaving only a gap in the less traveled portion between Kenly and VA I-295, and then of course south of I-20 to US-17 in SC (where 33 miles south of there to Georgia is planned).
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LM117

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #230 on: February 16, 2023, 08:44:57 AM »

I-95 border tolls would not be political suicide because it's plainly clear that NC residents aren't being targeted, and out-of-state travelers don't have a problem with a small contribution especially when they see all of the ongoing construction even right now.

That won't matter to eastern NC voters. I-95 goes through some of the poorest areas of the state. Just the mere mention of "I-95" and "tolls" in the same sentence would be all they need to hear for them to sign the political death warrant of whichever politician was unlucky enough to push it. That's why the issue of tolling I-95 was never brought up again.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2023, 08:50:28 AM by LM117 »
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froggie

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #231 on: February 16, 2023, 06:15:28 PM »

I-95 border tolls would not be political suicide because it's plainly clear that NC residents aren't being targeted, and out-of-state travelers don't have a problem with a small contribution especially when they see all of the ongoing construction even right now.

That won't matter to eastern NC voters. I-95 goes through some of the poorest areas of the state. Just the mere mention of "I-95" and "tolls" in the same sentence would be all they need to hear for them to sign the political death warrant of whichever politician was unlucky enough to push it. That's why the issue of tolling I-95 was never brought up again.

Fair enough, but the consequence of that opposition is it will take many many more years to rebuild and widen 95.
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LM117

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #232 on: February 17, 2023, 01:21:15 PM »

As part of the widening project, the Carthage Road bridge over I-95 in Lumberton will close on Feb. 23 so that demolition and construction of a new bridge can take place. The new bridge is expected to be open by fall 2024.

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2023/2023-02-17-robeson-county-bridge-replacement-i-95.aspx
« Last Edit: February 17, 2023, 01:23:51 PM by LM117 »
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NJRoadfan

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #233 on: February 26, 2023, 08:23:48 PM »

I'm betting that the Fayetteville Bypass was left out of the widening because traffic counts tend to dip there. NCDOT is likely relying on a completed I-295 and US-301/BL-95 siphoning off enough traffic. That section of roadway is much newer and better designed too. Even if it eventually needs to be widened, the work will be minimal because the overpasses are wide enough.
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sprjus4

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Re: I-95 Widening in North Carolina
« Reply #234 on: February 26, 2023, 09:05:13 PM »

^ Iím guessing itíll ultimately decide on how traffic handles there once both I-295 is complete and the widening is. Iíd argue they should have at least widened it to 6 lanes, because peak traffic on I-95 is going to inevitably cause a major chokepoint going from 4 to 2 lanes in either direction during holiday travel periods at the minimum.
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