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Author Topic: Nevada  (Read 48204 times)

Alps

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #125 on: June 19, 2021, 10:32:34 PM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

While living in Tangipahoa Parish (Louisiana) back in the second half of the Nineties, I saw work groups from the county jail doing various cleaning tasks.  It was rare to see a white person despite the parish population being rather evenly split between black and white.  That was something I had not expected to see.

Black thug culture had taken over the outdoors so much that children never played outside nor did any of them ever go trick or treating on Hallowe'en.  Drug dealers gathered in packs both in the cities and countryside.  Police actually protected the drug trade so they could have informers. which the Hammond LA police chief said accounted for 99% of crimes solved.  Black neighborhoods looked totally run down while the mostly white neighborhoods had the classic middle class look.  Hammond and Ponchatoula high schools had to be moved out of town and the campuses closed to hold down the troubles.

Very Third World were the conditions.  Oh well, at least the food was good. 

Rick
I'm not sure what you're getting at. You mention thug culture and third world conditions - please elaborate on why you are not a racist this Juneteenth.

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #126 on: June 20, 2021, 08:39:21 AM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

While living in Tangipahoa Parish (Louisiana) back in the second half of the Nineties, I saw work groups from the county jail doing various cleaning tasks.  It was rare to see a white person despite the parish population being rather evenly split between black and white.  That was something I had not expected to see.

Black thug culture had taken over the outdoors so much that children never played outside nor did any of them ever go trick or treating on Hallowe'en.  Drug dealers gathered in packs both in the cities and countryside.  Police actually protected the drug trade so they could have informers. which the Hammond LA police chief said accounted for 99% of crimes solved.  Black neighborhoods looked totally run down while the mostly white neighborhoods had the classic middle class look.  Hammond and Ponchatoula high schools had to be moved out of town and the campuses closed to hold down the troubles.

Very Third World were the conditions.  Oh well, at least the food was good. 

Rick
I'm not sure what you're getting at. You mention thug culture and third world conditions - please elaborate on why you are not a racist this Juneteenth.

These are just mentions of the reality that was in place about a quarter century ago.  My wife was black (she died of a seizure back in 2009) by the way so take your "woke" self out for a reality check by going there to see what is going on.

Rick
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Kniwt

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #127 on: December 06, 2021, 02:06:23 PM »

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that a new 2.75-mile arterial will be built across the booming Inspirada area of Henderson, with a possible connection to I-15 in the 2026-2030 time frame.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/news-columns/road-warrior/new-road-to-provide-traffic-relief-to-booming-west-henderson-2491709/

Quote
Construction on the $38 million, 2.75-mile Via Nobila arterial road project began on Nov. 1 and is expected to wrap up by the end of 2022, according to the city of Henderson.

The scope of the project calls for Via Nobila to consist of two lanes in each direction, with underground water lines, sewer, storm drains, infrastructure for traffic signals, and a bridge that will cross over a wash along the planned road.

A full traffic signal will be installed and operating at the future intersection of Via Nobila and Via Inspirada.

... Not part of the current scope of work is a future I-15 interchange for Via Nobila. Henderson officials have been working with NDOT, the Regional Transportation Commission and Clark County on initial planning for the interchange.

The parties are in the early design phase of the I-15 interchange, which isn’t expected to be under construction until between 2026 and 2030, according to the State Transportation Improvement Plan.

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brad2971

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #128 on: December 06, 2021, 06:01:55 PM »

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that a new 2.75-mile arterial will be built across the booming Inspirada area of Henderson, with a possible connection to I-15 in the 2026-2030 time frame.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/news-columns/road-warrior/new-road-to-provide-traffic-relief-to-booming-west-henderson-2491709/

Quote
Construction on the $38 million, 2.75-mile Via Nobila arterial road project began on Nov. 1 and is expected to wrap up by the end of 2022, according to the city of Henderson.

The scope of the project calls for Via Nobila to consist of two lanes in each direction, with underground water lines, sewer, storm drains, infrastructure for traffic signals, and a bridge that will cross over a wash along the planned road.

A full traffic signal will be installed and operating at the future intersection of Via Nobila and Via Inspirada.

... Not part of the current scope of work is a future I-15 interchange for Via Nobila. Henderson officials have been working with NDOT, the Regional Transportation Commission and Clark County on initial planning for the interchange.

The parties are in the early design phase of the I-15 interchange, which isn’t expected to be under construction until between 2026 and 2030, according to the State Transportation Improvement Plan.



I wonder if NDOT and the city of Henderson will do with the future Via Nobila interchange on I-15 what the city of Lone Tree and CDOT did with the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange on I-25. When the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange was constructed, CDOT got rid of the very substandard Exit 191 and built a frontage road (Havana St) on the east side of I-25 to connect Ridgegate Pkwy with Castle Pines Pkwy (Exit 188).

In the case of this future Via Nobila interchange, NDOT could easily get rid of the Sloan exit and have everyone use Las Vegas Blvd to reach those businesses at that exit while building the new Via Nobila interchange to the correct standards.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #129 on: December 06, 2021, 11:14:49 PM »

I wonder if they will extend the Bicentennial Parkway to it. What a weird intersection that is, the bicentennial parkway and Via Inspirada road is. The infrastructure in this is area is….. interesting
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skluth

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #130 on: December 07, 2021, 03:52:25 PM »

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that a new 2.75-mile arterial will be built across the booming Inspirada area of Henderson, with a possible connection to I-15 in the 2026-2030 time frame.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/news-columns/road-warrior/new-road-to-provide-traffic-relief-to-booming-west-henderson-2491709/

Quote
Construction on the $38 million, 2.75-mile Via Nobila arterial road project began on Nov. 1 and is expected to wrap up by the end of 2022, according to the city of Henderson.

The scope of the project calls for Via Nobila to consist of two lanes in each direction, with underground water lines, sewer, storm drains, infrastructure for traffic signals, and a bridge that will cross over a wash along the planned road.

A full traffic signal will be installed and operating at the future intersection of Via Nobila and Via Inspirada.

... Not part of the current scope of work is a future I-15 interchange for Via Nobila. Henderson officials have been working with NDOT, the Regional Transportation Commission and Clark County on initial planning for the interchange.

The parties are in the early design phase of the I-15 interchange, which isn’t expected to be under construction until between 2026 and 2030, according to the State Transportation Improvement Plan.



I wonder if NDOT and the city of Henderson will do with the future Via Nobila interchange on I-15 what the city of Lone Tree and CDOT did with the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange on I-25. When the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange was constructed, CDOT got rid of the very substandard Exit 191 and built a frontage road (Havana St) on the east side of I-25 to connect Ridgegate Pkwy with Castle Pines Pkwy (Exit 188).

In the case of this future Via Nobila interchange, NDOT could easily get rid of the Sloan exit and have everyone use Las Vegas Blvd to reach those businesses at that exit while building the new Via Nobila interchange to the correct standards.

A future Via Nobila interchange bridge would be about a mile south of the St Rose Parkway bridge over I-15. The Sloan exit is another mile further south from the future Via Nobila. The I-15 ramps for St Rose Parkway are quite long, extending almost a half mile south of the Parkway itself. A new interchange should include C/D lanes even if they remove the Sloan exit, though NDOT has plenty of experience building C/D lanes in Clark County.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #131 on: December 09, 2021, 10:25:46 AM »

I wonder if NDOT and the city of Henderson will do with the future Via Nobila interchange on I-15 what the city of Lone Tree and CDOT did with the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange on I-25. When the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange was constructed, CDOT got rid of the very substandard Exit 191 and built a frontage road (Havana St) on the east side of I-25 to connect Ridgegate Pkwy with Castle Pines Pkwy (Exit 188).

In the case of this future Via Nobila interchange, NDOT could easily get rid of the Sloan exit and have everyone use Las Vegas Blvd to reach those businesses at that exit while building the new Via Nobila interchange to the correct standards.

A future Via Nobila interchange bridge would be about a mile south of the St Rose Parkway bridge over I-15. The Sloan exit is another mile further south from the future Via Nobila. The I-15 ramps for St Rose Parkway are quite long, extending almost a half mile south of the Parkway itself. A new interchange should include C/D lanes even if they remove the Sloan exit, though NDOT has plenty of experience building C/D lanes in Clark County.

There are long-term plans to rebuild the Sloan interchange. This has actually been in long-term plans since the I-15 south EIS was completed circa 2008—that study led to several projects that have since been constructed, including the major I-15 widening and C/D road project that included reconstruction of the Blue Diamond interchange, the added Silverado Ranch interchange, and the recent added Cactus Ave interchange.

However, it now looks like the Sloan interchange project is renamed Via Inspirada in NDOT's latest major project quarterly update report. So I assume that the Sloan interchange is now not going to be rebuilt in its current location, but rather a bit to the north. If a Via Nobila interchange (formerly Bermuda Rd in earlier project updates) is also being built in between Via Inspirada and St Rose Pkwy, there's no way these three don't at least have braided ramps (I think C/D roads are unlikely).
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #132 on: May 27, 2022, 10:34:24 AM »

Clark County turning off Flashing Yellow Arrow left turn signals during peak periods in Las Vegas (or at least, the unincorporated areas of the valley).

Video via KVVU Fox5 & Facebook Watch:
https://fb.watch/dgClRK_LRJ/

Seems a bit draconian to me... I get it for certain intersections (especially turns across 3+ opposing lanes with 45mph speed limits where prevailing speeds are likely higher), but it would be better to evaluate this on a case-by-case basis.

City of Las Vegas has had a similar time-of-day setup at select (but not all) PPLT intersections for years. They even had this pre-FYA by using a modified 5-section PPLT display.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

jdbx

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #133 on: May 27, 2022, 01:37:35 PM »

Clark County turning off Flashing Yellow Arrow left turn signals during peak periods in Las Vegas (or at least, the unincorporated areas of the valley).

Video via KVVU Fox5 & Facebook Watch:
https://fb.watch/dgClRK_LRJ/

Seems a bit draconian to me... I get it for certain intersections (especially turns across 3+ opposing lanes with 45mph speed limits where prevailing speeds are likely higher), but it would be better to evaluate this on a case-by-case basis.

City of Las Vegas has had a similar time-of-day setup at select (but not all) PPLT intersections for years. They even had this pre-FYA by using a modified 5-section PPLT display.

Agreed.  I'd bet that there are only a handful of problem intersections. Better to address them case-by-case than delay every left-turning driver everywhere else.
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compdude787

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #134 on: June 11, 2022, 04:08:47 PM »

If there's so much oncoming traffic that it's not safe to even turn left, then it makes sense to get rid of the flashing yellow arrow.

roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #135 on: June 14, 2022, 12:04:53 AM »

If there's so much oncoming traffic that it's not safe to even turn left, then it makes sense to get rid of the flashing yellow arrow.
But that's the issue... They aren't doing a study to see if there really is too much oncoming traffic causing insufficient gaps, they're just turning the FYAs off during the peak period.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #136 on: June 14, 2022, 12:16:11 AM »

Guess it was windy in Vegas yesterday...

A traffic signal was knocked down in Flamingo Rd at Fort Apache Dr in southwest Las Vegas.

From the Vegas ABC affiliate:
https://www.ktnv.com/news/traffic-signal-down-on-ft-apache-flamingo-road


Seems a bit weird that wind would knock down a signal mast. They're usually built to withstand higher sustained winds than you typically see in Vegas. Makes me think there was a structural defect or something else that contributed.
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stevashe

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #137 on: June 14, 2022, 11:46:11 AM »

Looking at the twitter pictures in that article, it would appear that it was the bolts holding the mast arm to the base that failed, since the picture shows the pole being tipped over, but both it and the foundation are in-tact.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #138 on: June 27, 2022, 11:55:51 PM »

The interchange at US 395 & Lemmon Drive in the north valleys of Reno has been under construction to convert it from a standard diamond to Nevada's newest DDI, as part of a Washoe County RTC capacity improvement project on Lemmon Drive North of the interchange. The DDI conversion aspect of the project is now complete, per a recent RTC Facebook post.

Since the predominant movements are to/from Lemmon Drive to the north and US 395 to the south, it's a prime location for a DDI.
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bing101

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #139 on: June 28, 2022, 04:32:06 PM »

Here is a good scenic drive on Pyramid Lake.

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bing101

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #140 on: July 13, 2022, 09:49:39 AM »

Interstate Kyles tour of US-50 Nevada.

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pderocco

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #141 on: July 14, 2022, 07:39:12 PM »

Here is a good scenic drive on Pyramid Lake.


I took that ride once. When it deviates from the shore, it becomes clay, and continues that way to the California line, after which it is paved again. It ends up on US-395 near Susanville. Looks like there are interesting ways to get up to Gerlach and the Black Rock Desert, and to Cedarville CA in Surprise Valley.

Someday, I'd like to pay the Indian toll and drive up to Anaho Island and The Pyramid beyond it. There are also tufa formation at the north end of the lake (The Needles), but we palefaces aren't allowed up there. I don't think they're as photogenic as South Tufa at Mono Lake, though.

Hard to believe that's mostly water that was once in Lake Tahoe.
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Re: Nevada
« Reply #142 on: July 29, 2022, 06:14:35 PM »

It's rare to see some flash floods in Las Vegas who flooded some streets and casinos.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #143 on: July 30, 2022, 05:15:17 PM »

Flash flooding is not all that rare in Las Vegas—I think people just think it is because of the desert climate. Having grown up in Vegas, it's something that was ingrained in me over the years. This part of summer is monsoon season (which starts up around mid-June and can last until September) where weather patterns can bring on thunderstorms quickly. Due to the type of soil around the valley (most of which is not very permeable) and all the development, quick downpours don't have a chance to soak into the soil and can cause flooding because the relatively high amount of rain in a short time frame can have nowhere to go. Flash flooding has probably occurred less in recent years due to ongoing drought, so it's probably not really at the forefront of people's minds.

The effects of flash flooding in Las Vegas have greatly diminished in the last decades due largely to the efforts of the Clark County Regional Flood Control District. The CCRFCD has built over 200 miles of flood control channels and 82 flood detention basins in the Las Vegas Valley since the organization was formed in the mid-1980s, and they still have a lot of work to do on their master plan. But even with those efforts, there are still perennial trouble spots. The video in the second tweet showing the flooded parking garage I assume is at the Linq—this is adjacent to/on top of the Flamingo Wash, and I can recall many reports of this flooding during heavy rains when I was growing up (back when the property was the Imperial Palace). Another one was the Charleston Blvd underpass at the UPRR, which would often flood even during light rains (and invariably at least one vehicle would get stuck down there every time) until a project in the last decade finally fixed it. Local news stations would often send reporters and camera to these two locations in advance when strong rains were predicted.

This time of year, it is common to see ads/public service announcements from the CCRFCD reminding people to stay out of flood channels and to not drive through flooded streets—a refrain used for as long as I can remember is "turn around, don't drown". A long-running campaign played off of Nevada's culture of personalized license plates to warn of the dangers or lament boneheaded decisions regarding flooding—this was very popular on billboards around town, and had a few TV commercials over the years (here's a couple from 2010 and 2012 via their YouTube channel).
« Last Edit: July 30, 2022, 05:19:45 PM by roadfro »
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

Scott5114

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #144 on: July 30, 2022, 06:57:52 PM »

Flash flooding is not all that rare in Las Vegas—I think people just think it is because of the desert climate. Having grown up in Vegas, it's something that was ingrained in me over the years. This part of summer is monsoon season (which starts up around mid-June and can last until September) where weather patterns can bring on thunderstorms quickly. Due to the type of soil around the valley (most of which is not very permeable) and all the development, quick downpours don't have a chance to soak into the soil and can cause flooding because the relatively high amount of rain in a short time frame can have nowhere to go. Flash flooding has probably occurred less in recent years due to ongoing drought, so it's probably not really at the forefront of people's minds.

The effects of flash flooding in Las Vegas have greatly diminished in the last decades due largely to the efforts of the Clark County Regional Flood Control District. The CCRFCD has built over 200 miles of flood control channels and 82 flood detention basins in the Las Vegas Valley since the organization was formed in the mid-1980s, and they still have a lot of work to do on their master plan. But even with those efforts, there are still perennial trouble spots. The video in the second tweet showing the flooded parking garage I assume is at the Linq—this is adjacent to/on top of the Flamingo Wash, and I can recall many reports of this flooding during heavy rains when I was growing up (back when the property was the Imperial Palace). Another one was the Charleston Blvd underpass at the UPRR, which would often flood even during light rains (and invariably at least one vehicle would get stuck down there every time) until a project in the last decade finally fixed it. Local news stations would often send reporters and camera to these two locations in advance when strong rains were predicted.

It's really interesting to me that this time of year is monsoon season in Nevada, when it's the precise time of year that Oklahoma gets practically no rain at all.

Looking around at the maps, it looks like CCRFCD has built the system to channel all of that flood water into Lake Las Vegas and then on to Lake Mead. Hopefully that means all this flooding will raise the level of Lake Mead a bit.
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US 89

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #145 on: July 31, 2022, 01:00:11 AM »

It's really interesting to me that this time of year is monsoon season in Nevada, when it's the precise time of year that Oklahoma gets practically no rain at all.

Which is actually correlated. In general, the high pressure system that parks over the plains and keeps you high and dry in mid to late summer is the same pattern that steers moisture from the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of California into the southwest.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2022, 01:02:56 AM by US 89 »
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #146 on: July 31, 2022, 02:01:28 PM »

Looking around at the maps, it looks like CCRFCD has built the system to channel all of that flood water into Lake Las Vegas and then on to Lake Mead. Hopefully that means all this flooding will raise the level of Lake Mead a bit.

Yeah, most of the flood control infrastructure conveys flood waters towards a few of the natural washes, which all eventually feed into the Las Vegas Wash (which is the main outflow from the Las Vegas Valley) toward Lake Mead. Lake Las Vegas is a reservoir built along the wash just outside the valley, but is more a commercial venture—apparently there are bypass pipes under the lake that carry the actual flows from the wash through.

Unfortunately, the rain and floodwater received in Vegas recently is really just a drop in the bucket for Lake Mead. Lake Mead's water is mostly snow melt from further up the Colorado River. A recent local news explanation: How Southern Nevada's recent storms have affected Lake Mead, KSNV News3 7/29/2022

« Last Edit: July 31, 2022, 02:22:53 PM by roadfro »
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Re: Nevada
« Reply #147 on: August 01, 2022, 01:46:27 PM »

« Last Edit: August 01, 2022, 06:30:51 PM by Alps »
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