Regional Boards > Canada

MTL: The Metropolitan Highway to remain an elevated structure

<< < (2/2)

webfil:

--- Quote from: Stephane Dumas on January 31, 2021, 02:36:59 PM ---A-640 going down to Hudson, that would bring opposition with A-640 passing thru the Oka provincial park or Kanesatake Indian reserve.
--- End quote ---
Regarding the Outaouais crossing, a westward extension of A-640 is unlikely to have been planned beyond 1973, with the major Outaouais river and Deux-Montagnes lake floodings of 1974-1976, the subsequent 1976-1985 projet Archipel (project combining hydro-electrical power generation, a national park and flood protection), the mid-80's recession and the 1990 Oka Crisis (as well as the buildup that led to it) that raised serious questions about taking into account aboriginal stakes in the development of the greater Montréal.

Therefore, I have yet to see some serious proposals coming from the MTQ about this ― I'm not denying their existence, just being curious if they exist at all. Perhaps some studies emerged from the cooldown periods ?

1971 plans rather called for a highway through Oka National Park, then through Oka crisis' pine-tree forest, onward to R-344 between Pointe-aux-Anglais and Saint-Placide. Constructing a multi-million dollar bridge over the Outaouais (even in 70's dollar value) whereas you have A-50 that's under construction just a few kilometres north, with a routing roughly redundant with A-40, does not seem like a consequent and reasonable investment, even in the light of today's traffic figures at Hawkesbury bridge and Hudson ferry.

Richard3:

--- Quote from: webfil on February 09, 2021, 03:34:47 PM ---
--- Quote from: Stephane Dumas on January 31, 2021, 02:36:59 PM ---A-640 going down to Hudson, that would bring opposition with A-640 passing thru the Oka provincial park or Kanesatake Indian reserve.
--- End quote ---
Regarding the Outaouais crossing, a westward extension of A-640 is unlikely to have been planned beyond 1973, with the major Outaouais river and Deux-Montagnes lake floodings of 1974-1976, the subsequent 1976-1985 projet Archipel (project combining hydro-electrical power generation, a national park and flood protection), the mid-80's recession and the 1990 Oka Crisis (as well as the buildup that led to it) that raised serious questions about taking into account aboriginal stakes in the development of the greater Montréal.

Therefore, I have yet to see some serious proposals coming from the MTQ about this ― I'm not denying their existence, just being curious if they exist at all. Perhaps some studies emerged from the cooldown periods ?

1971 plans rather called for a highway through Oka National Park, then through Oka crisis' pine-tree forest, onward to R-344 between Pointe-aux-Anglais and Saint-Placide. Constructing a multi-million dollar bridge over the Outaouais (even in 70's dollar value) whereas you have A-50 that's under construction just a few kilometres north, with a routing roughly redundant with A-40, does not seem like a consequent and reasonable investment, even in the light of today's traffic figures at Hawkesbury bridge and Hudson ferry.
--- End quote ---

AADTs are not justifying the projet through Oka National Park; from east to west, we have 17,400 on A-640 between partial exit 2 and R-344, then on that highway, 8200 between the end of A-640 and western end of Chemin des Collines, and 7500 between that point and rue Girouard, west of the village of Oka. From that point, the AADT drops to only 2800, a figure that will never justify an interstate-grade freeway.

On the other hand, the Greater Montreal Area is the most populated metropolitan area in North America that doesn't have a real peripheral highway, so a connection between A-640 in Oka and A-40 in Hudson would be one of the two missing links to complete that peripheral highway, the other one being another stretch of A-640, between A-40 in Charlemagne and A-30 in Varennes, east of Montreal.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

Go to full version