Regional Boards > Canada

Highest km-marker in Canada (and North America)?

<< < (3/5) > >>

deathtopumpkins:
So within the gap between Natashquan and Vieux-Fort there are actually small stretches of paved highway signed as R-138, and in the winter they're all linked up by a snowmobile trail, but they're isolated during the summer?

I'm wondering because I've had an increasing interest in northern Canada lately and R-138 looks like it would be a particularly interesting drive, but I was under the impression that there is no other link to the Vieux-Fort - Blanc-Sablon section apart from the Trans-Labrador Highway.

cpzilliacus:

--- Quote from: oscar on October 27, 2012, 02:11:37 PM ---
--- Quote from: cpzilliacus on October 27, 2012, 01:26:47 PM ---If the existing 138 is about 1389 km long (per Wikipedia - not sure if that includes the Blanc Sablon segment existing today), then it seems than an extended 138 is only about 1854 km long (including 425 km of new highway and the 40 km needing "further study").
--- End quote ---

If the 1854 km figure doesn't include the Blanc Sablon segment, which is about 70 km long (it extends west to Old Fort), QC 138 could eventually overtake Canada's part of the Alaska Highway -- especially if the latter keeps shrinking as its curvier segments are straightened, and if periodic re-calibrations reflect those realignments.

--- End quote ---

Curious about extreme eastern areas of Quebec along the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  From the geographic names around there (such as Old Fort), it seems that English may predominate over French.  Is that correct, or are the names a just legacy of English-language exploration there? 

And I understand that the population there is pretty sparse to begin with.

oscar:

--- Quote from: cpzilliacus on October 28, 2012, 08:48:21 AM ---Curious about extreme eastern areas of Quebec along the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  From the geographic names around there (such as Old Fort), it seems that English may predominate over French.  Is that correct, or are the names a just legacy of English-language exploration there?
--- End quote ---

My impression, from my quick drive out to Vieux-Fort and Old Fort Bay before turning east to the Trans-Labrador Highway, is that French predominates, with only scattered English place names like you see in some other parts of Quebec.

French-language place names bleed over into southern Labrador, starting with L'Anse-au-Clair (first town pn the TLH east of the border), with a few more examples before English place names take over. 

webfil:

--- Quote from: deathtopumpkins on October 28, 2012, 12:39:06 AM ---So within the gap between Natashquan and Vieux-Fort there are actually small stretches of paved highway signed as R-138, and in the winter they're all linked up by a snowmobile trail, but they're isolated during the summer?
--- End quote ---

Note quite isolated, but linked with a network of toll ferries, owned by la Société des Traversiers du Québec (a provincial government corporation, subsidiary of MTQ) :


* N.M. Nordik-Express (operated by Groupe Desgagnés, a maritime corporation having operated on the northern coasts of the St. Lawrence for almost 150 years) ensures the Relais-Nordik ("northern relay", literally). It links Rimouski, Sept-Îles, Havre-Saint-Pierre, Natashquan, Port-Menier (Anticosti Island), Kegaska, La Romaine, Harrington-Harbour, Tête-à-la-Baleine, La Tabatière, Saint-Augustin and Blanc-Sablon. N.M. Nordik-Express carries passengers, small vehicles, cargo and bulk goods. It operates from April to January.

Oh, and the ride is 78.5 hours long (4 days).
* N.M. Mécatina operates on Harrington-Harbour―Chevery, on demand. Côte-Nord-du-Golfe-du-Saint-Laurent municipality is responsible for the administration of the cargo and taxi link.
* Two small barges links Saint-Augustin and Pakuashipi, one for passengers operated by Saint-Augustin municipality, the other for cargo, operated by 9005-6425 Québec Inc. (AKA Transport Driscoll).
Route Blanche is exempt of any tolls or schedule.  :-P
That trail is a liberation for the villages down there, as they no longer depend on a weekly ferry or expensive plane seats ; Air Labrador offers multi-thousand-dollars plane tickets for lower north shore flights in 7 or 18-seater cuckoos (don't expect to find discounts on Expedia or Trip Advisor...).


--- Quote from: deathtopumpkins on October 28, 2012, 12:39:06 AM ---I'm wondering because I've had an increasing interest in northern Canada lately and R-138 looks like it would be a particularly interesting drive.
--- End quote ---
It's a long, long drive, but BEAU-TI-FUL, according to every relative and every friend that lived or went on the North Shore. Glaciers really did a good landscaping job east of Sept-Îles.  :sombrero:
Count 10-12 hours for a safe drive between Tadoussac ferry and km 1392. The road is paved up to Pointe-Parent.


--- Quote from: oscar on October 28, 2012, 10:33:29 AM ---
--- Quote from: cpzilliacus on October 28, 2012, 08:48:21 AM ---Curious about extreme eastern areas of Quebec along the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  From the geographic names around there (such as Old Fort), it seems that English may predominate over French.  Is that correct, or are the names a just legacy of English-language exploration there?
--- End quote ---

My impression, from my quick drive out to Vieux-Fort and Old Fort Bay before turning east to the Trans-Labrador Highway, is that French predominates, with only scattered English place names like you see in some other parts of Quebec.
--- End quote ---

That is not exact. The vast majority of non-indian residents have english as mother-tongue.

According to the 2011 census, here are the stats :

* Côte-Nord-du-Golfe-du-Saint-Laurent (settlements of Kegaska, Musquaro, Wolf Bay, Étamamiou, Chevery, Harrington Harbour, Aylmer Sound and Tête-à-la-Baleine) counts over 60% of english-speaking people (english or french AND english as mother-tongue);
* Gros-Mécatina (mostly Mutton Bay, Red Bay and La Tabatière) counts 94% of native english people;
* La Romaine has 99% of Indian language-speaker (innu, in that case), but 5% of the population declare to know English;
* Data is unavailable for Pakuashipi, as an insignificant number of the census forms were completed -> the federal government stopped making completion of census mandatory;
* Saint-Augustin counts 97% of native english people;
* Bonne-Espérance (settlements of Vieux-Fort, Rivière-Saint-Paul, Salmon Bay and Middle Bay) counts over 97% of native english people;
* Blanc-Sablon (settlements of Brador, Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon and Blanc-Sablon) counts 75% of native english people;

deathtopumpkins:
So it looks like it would be feasible to drive up to Natashquan, then catch a boat to Blanc-Sablon to drive that stretch and then maybe continue into Labrador, but it would cost a LOT of money. If I'm reading the rates right, carrying a vehicle between those two points costs over $400, plus over $100 per person, and takes from 8am Thursday to 7pm Friday.

Now I'm starting to think it might be a better idea to split this up into multiple trips, and just drive R-138 up to Natashquan/Pointe-Parent/km 1392 as one trip, and then snag the Blanc-Sablon section of R-138 as part of a trip across the Trans-Labrador Highway. I feel like spending 2 days on a boat as part of a roadtrip, and spending hundreds of dollars in the process, is not my idea of fun. Though probably by the time I could manage to afford this MTQ will have completed R-138 anyway, so maybe it won't matter!  :-D

Thank you for your answers! It's good to know we have someone on here so knowledgeable about this region.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version