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Highest km-marker in Canada (and North America)?

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Duke87:
Per Wikipedia:

BC 97       2081.0 km
ON 17      1962.0 km
ON 11      1780.2 km
QC 138    1389.3 km

So, we've got a couple other candidates here.

oscar:

--- Quote from: Duke87 on October 27, 2012, 09:43:06 AM ---Per Wikipedia:

BC 97       2081.0 km
ON 17      1962.0 km
ON 11      1780.2 km
QC 138    1389.3 km

So, we've got a couple other candidates here.

--- End quote ---

BC 97's km-markers reset to zero at Dawson Creek, where the Alaska Highway begins.  Dawson Creek is km 0 for YT 1 as well, and mile 0 for the Alaska Highway segment of AK 2.  Alaska hasn't re-calibrated its Alaska Highway mileposts in many years, so it has a stable highest milepost 1421 (plus a mile 1422 monument) in Delta Junction AK.

I don't recall seeing high km-markers at the west end of ON 17, when I traveled that stretch twice this summer.  I think at that point, the km-markers run from west to east (rather than the reverse for the rest of ON 17), with km 0 at the MB/ON border. 

ON 11's km-markers definitely run from east to west on its westernmost Rainy River segment.  They also start at around 100 at its easternmost point (picking up on ON 400's kilometerage, where ON 11 peels away).  But still it would fall a little short of YT 1's km-marker 1902.

cpzilliacus:

--- Quote from: oscar on October 26, 2012, 08:29:57 PM ----- If Quebec ever fills in the gap between the main and Blanc Sablon segments of QC 138, and places km-markers on the latter (there weren't any in August 2011), would it have km-markers above 1902?

--- End quote ---

That would be a pretty long haul, wouldn't it?

The (English-language) Wikipedia article about PQ 138 says:


--- Quote ---On August 25, 2006, the Quebec government announced a 10-year project to build 425 kilometres of highway along the north shore, excluding a 40 kilometre gap at a major river crossing, the Natashquan, which will require further study.
--- End quote ---

If the existing 138 is about 1389 km long (per Wikipedia - not sure if that includes the Blanc Sablon segment existing today), then it seems than an extended 138 is only about 1854 km long (including 425 km of new highway and the 40 km needing "further study").

Edit: Hyperlinked the PQ 138 wikipedia article.

oscar:

--- Quote from: cpzilliacus on October 27, 2012, 01:26:47 PM ---If the existing 138 is about 1389 km long (per Wikipedia - not sure if that includes the Blanc Sablon segment existing today), then it seems than an extended 138 is only about 1854 km long (including 425 km of new highway and the 40 km needing "further study").
--- End quote ---

If the 1854 km figure doesn't include the Blanc Sablon segment, which is about 70 km long (it extends west to Old Fort), QC 138 could eventually overtake Canada's part of the Alaska Highway -- especially if the latter keeps shrinking as its curvier segments are straightened, and if periodic re-calibrations reflect those realignments.

webfil:
R-138 passable with a passenger vehicle is actually about 1520-1525 kilometres long, if you add the 1392 km between Dundee and Natashquan river, 15 km in Kegaska, 4 km in Chevery, 17 km in Tête-à-la-Baleine, 15 km between Mutton Bay/Red Bay/La Tabatière, 4 km in Pakuashipi and 72.069 km between Vieux-Fort and QC/NL boundary.

Here is the marker


All of those mini-stretches are signed with R-138 shields, although they do not have direction plates (just plain shields and arrows). Some are even paved, but don't expect to get around without a pickup in winter, though.

Why did I say "passable with a passenger car?" : Winter.
Add another 499.6 km of "Route Blanche" ("White Route"), which is a portion of R-138 ―yes, it is signed as route 138―, only passable by snowmobile between Pointe-Parent and Québec/Newfoundland-and-Labrador boundary. The trail, maintained by the MTQ, mostly runs on ice. The Ministry of transportation also maintains a network of 23 rest and emergency shelters along the route. I don't know about a continuity in the markers with the "fixed" R-138, but the trail is definetly kilometre-posted.

Two of my uncles used to lived in Tête-à-la-Baleine. They say you can get good speed (50-60 mph) on certain stretches of the White Route, which would certainly not be the case in the event of a gravel road.

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