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dmuzika:
Alberta private member’s bill would increase some highway speed limits to 120 km/h
Caley Ramsay, Global News

--- Quote ---A private member’s bill has been introduced which, if passed, would increase the speed limit on some Alberta highways.

UCP MLA Searle Turton introduced Bill 213: the Traffic Safety (Maximum Speed Limit for Provincial Freeways) Amendment Act on Wednesday.

If passed, the bill would set the maximum speed limit for many provincial freeways at 120 kilometres per hour [75 MPH].

“Bill 213 would allow motorists to use our freeways at the speeds they were designed and engineered for, and match posted speed limits with the realistic speeds commuters follow. Evidence shows this would make our freeways safer,” Turton said in a news release Thursday.
--- End quote ---
https://globalnews.ca/news/7690854/alberta-private-members-bill-highway-speed/

Interesting that the article alludes to both freeways and divided highways. If it was strictly rural freeways, then technically only the Hwy 2 between Edmonton & Calgary, Hwy 1 between Calgary and Banff National Park, and a short stretch of Hwy 16 would qualify; however if it was divided highways then it would broaden the scope. There are some pretty isolated divided highways that aren't technically freeways where you could probably get away with 120 km/h, traffic is likely travelling that speed or higher anyways.

cbeach40:

--- Quote from: dmuzika on March 11, 2021, 05:33:37 PM ---https://globalnews.ca/news/7690854/alberta-private-members-bill-highway-speed/

Interesting that the article alludes to both freeways and divided highways. If it was strictly rural freeways, then technically only the Hwy 2 between Edmonton & Calgary, Hwy 1 between Calgary and Banff National Park, and a short stretch of Hwy 16 would qualify; however if it was divided highways then it would broaden the scope. There are some pretty isolated divided highways that aren't technically freeways where you could probably get away with 120 km/h, traffic is likely travelling that speed or higher anyways.

--- End quote ---

The text of the bill states:

--- Quote ---“provincial freeway” means a provincial highway designated as a freeway under section 4 of the Highways Development and Protection Act that is located outside of an urban area

--- End quote ---

and


--- Quote ---(c) by adding the following after clause (a):
(a.1) 120 kilometres per hour is the maximum speed limit for a provincial freeway that is not subject to an order made under subsection (2);

--- End quote ---
https://docs.assembly.ab.ca/LADDAR_files/docs/bills/bill/legislature_30/session_2/20200225_bill-213.pdf

So it might not be based on design criteria but rather functional classification, which if like other provinces would leave the door open to freeway-like divided highways. Ultimately the wording has left the locations to the discretion of the Alberta Ministry of Transportation's traffic engineering folks, where could actually safely be posted at 120 km/h.

BigManFromAFRICA88:
Anybody know what future plans there are, if any, for that super wide northeast curve of Stoney Trail (between Country Hills Blvd and 60 St NE)? It's always made me curious, and I can't find anything myself...

Concrete Bob:
About five or ten years ago, I believe I read on the old " Yahoo Canroads" site that a northward extension to a point north of Airdrie to AB-2 was in planning at Stoney Trail's wide "bend." Once the new corridor was complete, AB-2 would be re-routed along the east side of Calgary along the existing Stoney Trail, along with a southern extension of Stoney Trail that would join existing AB-2 near Okotoks.  In essence, the east side of AB-201 would become AB-2.

Then, the province would relegate Deerfoot Trail to the City of Calgary and all other affected local municipalities.     

BigManFromAFRICA88:

--- Quote from: Concrete Bob on April 13, 2021, 12:00:40 AM ---About five or ten years ago, I believe I read on the old " Yahoo Canroads" site that a northward extension to a point north of Airdrie to AB-2 was in planning at Stoney Trail's wide "bend." Once the new corridor was complete, AB-2 would be re-routed along the east side of Calgary along the existing Stoney Trail, along with a southern extension of Stoney Trail that would join existing AB-2 near Okotoks.  In essence, the east side of AB-201 would become AB-2.

Then, the province would relegate Deerfoot Trail to the City of Calgary and all other affected local municipalities.     

--- End quote ---

Very interesting, thanks!

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