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roadman65:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/54480415@N08/52729164309 The triangle shields I guess are the way Tennessee shields secondary, or routes that other states use blue pentagons in their signing?

Mapmikey:
Not really. Triangles were how state highways were signed until 1983 when they added many miles of routing and divided the system into state primary and state secondary. The secondary highways continued to use the triangle while the primary highways got a new shield which the TN 153 shield in your photo has.

They still sign with the different shields even though in recent years they ditched the primary/secondary delineation in their state highway system.

Some Tennessee counties use the blue pentagon for their county routes.

wriddle082:

--- Quote from: Mapmikey on March 06, 2023, 06:40:37 PM ---Not really. Triangles were how state highways were signed until 1983 when they added many miles of routing and divided the system into state primary and state secondary. The secondary highways continued to use the triangle while the primary highways got a new shield which the TN 153 shield in your photo has.

They still sign with the different shields even though in recent years they ditched the primary/secondary delineation in their state highway system.

Some Tennessee counties use the blue pentagon for their county routes.

--- End quote ---

Their definition of what constituted a primary highway was that it ďprimarily connects citiesĒ.  So essentially the major routes or shortest routes between county seats or other relevant cities were primary, and everything else was deemed to be secondary.  At times you would have routes that flipped back and forth between primary and secondary.  TN 46 is a good example of this, as it is secondary from its beginning at US 79 to Dickson (including across the Cumberland City Ferry), then itís primary from Dickson to the intersection with TN 100 and TN 7 in Bon Aqua, and then itís secondary again from TN 100 through Leiperís Fork to its ending at US 431 in the Grassland community north of Franklin.

And I am aware of only three counties that use the blue pentagon for their numbered county routes, and they are all in East Tennessee: Meigs, McMinn, and Monroe.

Also, if you look at various roads in rural Tennessee in Google Maps and you see a four digit designation on a rural road, either in a circle or a rectangle, and itís not in one of the three counties I mentioned, I guarantee you it isnít signed.  It is most likely a state-aid designation that was given by the state for roads that they help with maintenance costs, such as bridges.  For example, I used to live off of a roadway in Cheatham County that Google Maps shows as being designated ď1948Ē in an oval.  As far as I know, it has never been signed as such, and has always been referred to as Kingston Springs Rd.  But it does have two bridges, one over a major CSX rail line and another over a large creek, that likely receives maintenance/inspections by TDOT, and it does receive salt treatments and plowing during snowy weather events, most likely also by TDOT.

roadman65:
Thanks for the heads up ^^^^

https://goo.gl/maps/NHvJBZHkAxqhDZ8G7

https://goo.gl/maps/NXo7muAeErsrbF3G9

This here is awful. No mention of US 76 on the guide for Exit 1 on I-75.

74/171FAN:
If I remember correctly, US 76 was signed well enough along US 41 despite that. (If you do not include the odd western terminus that on maps coincides with the southern terminus of US 127)

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