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New Construction Technology

Started by kernals12, March 23, 2021, 05:23:09 PM

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kernals12

Quote from: kalvado on May 10, 2023, 04:45:19 AM
Quote from: kernals12 on May 09, 2023, 11:56:21 PM
Did you guys know that you can build roads out of precast concrete modules? I sure as hell didn't. It's much faster than conventional methods. Though I do wonder how they handle it when the roadway isn't perfectly straight.
To begin with, this is reconstruction - not a green field construction. Makes quite a difference.
And still not the most impressive example of such kind of work


Is that AI rendered?


jeffandnicole

Quote from: kernals12 on May 09, 2023, 11:56:21 PM
Did you guys know that you can build roads out of precast concrete modules? I sure as hell didn't. It's much faster than conventional methods. Though I do wonder how they handle it when the roadway isn't perfectly straight.

Based on the article's date, it's not really new technology, and based on NJDOT's seminar ( https://www.njdottechtransfer.net/2020/06/11/lunchtime-tech-talk-webinar-evaluation-precast-concrete_systems/ ) and report ( https://dspace.njstatelib.org/bitstream/handle/10929/56560/t7642019g.pdf?isAllowed=y&sequence=1 ), at least 17 states are using precast concrete slabs.  NJ's reports reviewed several states experiences and policies, including California's. 

I didn't read thru the reports in depth, but to very briefly summarize:  A big benefit is why CA did what they did:  Minimize lane closures.  When permanently closing a lane during a construction project isn't an option, allowing nighttime closures to rip out concrete slabs and place a new slab in while permitting traffic to have full access to the highway during the day is huge. One of the bigger downsides is cost.

CA's project is probably one of the larger ones.  I think NJ has done a lot of smaller PCP slab projects, such as here where they've replaced several feet around older concrete joints. https://goo.gl/maps/ZxerE5PKNtLXE8Uu9

kalvado

Quote from: kernals12 on May 10, 2023, 07:33:28 PM
Quote from: kalvado on May 10, 2023, 04:45:19 AM
Quote from: kernals12 on May 09, 2023, 11:56:21 PM
Did you guys know that you can build roads out of precast concrete modules? I sure as hell didn't. It's much faster than conventional methods. Though I do wonder how they handle it when the roadway isn't perfectly straight.
To begin with, this is reconstruction - not a green field construction. Makes quite a difference.
And still not the most impressive example of such kind of work


Is that AI rendered?
Perfectly real shot.

kernals12

Quote from: jeffandnicole on May 10, 2023, 07:58:30 PM
Quote from: kernals12 on May 09, 2023, 11:56:21 PM
Did you guys know that you can build roads out of precast concrete modules? I sure as hell didn't. It's much faster than conventional methods. Though I do wonder how they handle it when the roadway isn't perfectly straight.

Based on the article's date, it's not really new technology, and based on NJDOT's seminar ( https://www.njdottechtransfer.net/2020/06/11/lunchtime-tech-talk-webinar-evaluation-precast-concrete_systems/ ) and report ( https://dspace.njstatelib.org/bitstream/handle/10929/56560/t7642019g.pdf?isAllowed=y&sequence=1 ), at least 17 states are using precast concrete slabs.  NJ's reports reviewed several states experiences and policies, including California's. 

I didn't read thru the reports in depth, but to very briefly summarize:  A big benefit is why CA did what they did:  Minimize lane closures.  When permanently closing a lane during a construction project isn't an option, allowing nighttime closures to rip out concrete slabs and place a new slab in while permitting traffic to have full access to the highway during the day is huge. One of the bigger downsides is cost.

CA's project is probably one of the larger ones.  I think NJ has done a lot of smaller PCP slab projects, such as here where they've replaced several feet around older concrete joints. https://goo.gl/maps/ZxerE5PKNtLXE8Uu9

Perhaps in the future they'll have ones made of lightweight carbon fiber that can be installed without expensive machinery

kalvado

Quote from: kernals12 on May 11, 2023, 11:07:04 AM
Quote from: jeffandnicole on May 10, 2023, 07:58:30 PM
Quote from: kernals12 on May 09, 2023, 11:56:21 PM
Did you guys know that you can build roads out of precast concrete modules? I sure as hell didn't. It's much faster than conventional methods. Though I do wonder how they handle it when the roadway isn't perfectly straight.

Based on the article's date, it's not really new technology, and based on NJDOT's seminar ( https://www.njdottechtransfer.net/2020/06/11/lunchtime-tech-talk-webinar-evaluation-precast-concrete_systems/ ) and report ( https://dspace.njstatelib.org/bitstream/handle/10929/56560/t7642019g.pdf?isAllowed=y&sequence=1 ), at least 17 states are using precast concrete slabs.  NJ's reports reviewed several states experiences and policies, including California's. 

I didn't read thru the reports in depth, but to very briefly summarize:  A big benefit is why CA did what they did:  Minimize lane closures.  When permanently closing a lane during a construction project isn't an option, allowing nighttime closures to rip out concrete slabs and place a new slab in while permitting traffic to have full access to the highway during the day is huge. One of the bigger downsides is cost.

CA's project is probably one of the larger ones.  I think NJ has done a lot of smaller PCP slab projects, such as here where they've replaced several feet around older concrete joints. https://goo.gl/maps/ZxerE5PKNtLXE8Uu9

Perhaps in the future they'll have ones made of lightweight carbon fiber that can be installed without expensive machinery
Is there enough oil in the world to make all that plastic?

Road Hog

My hometown HS moved the graduation walk with seniors' names embossed in the segments from the old school to the new school some time in the 1990s.

I always wondered ever since then why they can't just level out concrete sidewalks and roads the same way for a hella lot less money.

kernals12

The Swiss Federal Roads Office has developed a mobile temporary flyover for construction work. In just one weekend, the overpass is assembled over the stretch of highway that is to be repaired. Then, motorists simply drive over the construction work. Drivers benefit from the elimination of lane closures and construction crews benefit from improved safety and protection from rain and snow.

Max Rockatansky

Late to the game on that one, that made the rounds on the Facebook road groups already.  Many of the highway engineers in the community pointed out the drawbacks of attempting to use it on limited access roads.

kernals12

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on May 26, 2024, 09:52:24 AMLate to the game on that one, that made the rounds on the Facebook road groups already.  Many of the highway engineers in the community pointed out the drawbacks of attempting to use it on limited access roads.

I'm most interested in how similar construction methods could be used for *permanent* structures.

Max Rockatansky

If you're after something like that there is three Bailey Bridges I know of that more or less became quasi permanent.  I doubt a wheeled structure would ever be intended to a permanent solution but could hypothetically become one by accident.

kalvado

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on May 26, 2024, 10:06:57 AMIf you're after something like that there is three Bailey Bridges I know of that more or less became quasi permanent.  I doubt a wheeled structure would ever be intended to a permanent solution but could hypothetically become one by accident.
Wheels can work many ways.
For example, I saw equipment where wheel brackets were a removable (and potentially reusable) feature with more permanent supports being retractable, also for leveling.
So wheel in place, lower permanent legs, level, unbolt wheels.

epzik8

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on May 26, 2024, 10:06:57 AMIf you're after something like that there is three Bailey Bridges I know of that more or less became quasi permanent.  I doubt a wheeled structure would ever be intended to a permanent solution but could hypothetically become one by accident.

Had to look up Bailey bridges, and it struck me how they're essentially a worldwide item.
From the land of red, white, yellow and black.
____________________________

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Rothman

Yeah, the FB posts made the claim that the whole idea of a temporary bridge was new...

We are definitely entering an era where stupidity will be an ever-increasing force of nature.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

kalvado

#263
Quote from: Rothman on May 26, 2024, 10:07:21 PMYeah, the FB posts made the claim that the whole idea of a temporary bridge was new...

We are definitely entering an era where stupidity will be an ever-increasing force of nature.
Welcome to the planet Earth, young Padawan! Is that your first time here?
May the force to deal with these things be with you!

kernals12

#264
Temporary bridges are not new, but using them for this specific purpose certainly is. And I hardly need to explain the implications if highway overpasses could be erected over a weekend

triplemultiplex

Quote from: Max Rockatansky on May 26, 2024, 10:06:57 AMIf you're after something like that there is three Bailey Bridges I know of that more or less became quasi permanent.  I doubt a wheeled structure would ever be intended to a permanent solution but could hypothetically become one by accident.

There are permanent Bailey Bridges all over the place on logging roads up in Canada.
The one lake we went to, must've had three in a 60 km stretch.
Saw several in Alaska, as well.
"That's just like... your opinion, man."

Max Rockatansky

Quote from: triplemultiplex on May 28, 2024, 11:56:38 AM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on May 26, 2024, 10:06:57 AMIf you're after something like that there is three Bailey Bridges I know of that more or less became quasi permanent.  I doubt a wheeled structure would ever be intended to a permanent solution but could hypothetically become one by accident.

There are permanent Bailey Bridges all over the place on logging roads up in Canada.
The one lake we went to, must've had three in a 60 km stretch.
Saw several in Alaska, as well.

Heh, the one by me on Blackrock Road has a quasi-logging purpose.  It is mainly intended to access the PG&E company town of Balch Camp.  The other two I'm thinking of are on CA 140 in the Merced River Canyon (although they are planned to be someday removed).

pderocco

So what makes a Bailey bridge unsuitable for permanent use? Expensive? Short-lived? Unpleasant to cross? Bad in certain weather conditions?

Max Rockatansky

The two Baileys at the Ferguson Slide on CA 140 demonstrate the drawbacks of using them on conventional and well-traveled highways.  The single lane nature is probably the biggest negative followed closely by the long delays:

IMG_1219 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

IMG_1225 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

IMG_1234 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

IMG_1235 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

Irony is that the Baileys on CA 140 have a pretty high weight capacity:

IMG_1191 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

Now on something like Blackrock Road, having a permanent Bailey over the Middle Fork Kings River is no big deal:

3 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

But this would be the same road that gets by with the "Slippery Bridge" above Balch Camp:

27 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

28 by Max Rockatansky, on Flickr

BrianP

Quote from: pderocco on May 28, 2024, 03:59:39 PMSo what makes a Bailey bridge unsuitable for permanent use? Expensive? Short-lived? Unpleasant to cross? Bad in certain weather conditions?
There's a bailey bridge in use in Philadelphia which has lasted for about 28 years so far.
https://maps.app.goo.gl/W85nWTcEboLJwYKd8


kalvado

Quote from: BrianP on May 28, 2024, 05:38:58 PM
Quote from: pderocco on May 28, 2024, 03:59:39 PMSo what makes a Bailey bridge unsuitable for permanent use? Expensive? Short-lived? Unpleasant to cross? Bad in certain weather conditions?
There's a bailey bridge in use in Philadelphia which has lasted for about 28 years so far.
https://maps.app.goo.gl/W85nWTcEboLJwYKd8


I wonder if it is subject to annual inspections like a permanent one should

kernals12

They make temporary roadway "mats" for construction sites and event venues on soft ground. They consist of plastic tiles laid out on the ground and then bolted together. I wonder if they could be used for *permanent* roads with a stronger material.



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