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#1
Off-Topic / Re: Fisker Owners Need Parts. ...
Last post by kwellada - Today at 05:02:28 PM
Quote from: ZLoth on June 18, 2024, 09:02:06 AMYou are always going to have those "early adopters" of any technology, and first releases are usually more expensive and needs improvements versus more mature versions of the technology.

I've been doing software QA for over a decade and that makes me extremely leery of being a first adopter of a lot of technology for precisely the reasons you point out. First iterations, or minimally viable products, are just not going to be as impressive as what comes down the line later. I have zero issues with EVs and assume at some point I'll finally get one, but for me that date is a long time from now. My current cars are in great condition and should last me through 2030, if not longer. I'll reevaluate at that point if the charging infrastructure is robust as well as the ability to charge to full power within 10 minutes...and a range of 400+ miles.

The EV market is a bit soft for a number of reasons, but I think we've gone through the first adopters and the second round of enthusiasts. EV prices are awfully high and that precludes many buyers.
#2
Off-Topic / Re: Donald Sutherland dies at ...
Last post by kwellada - Today at 04:54:18 PM
An incredible acting career. I think "a life well lived" is about as good as it can get for a memorial.
#3
What might make these unique to NJ is that they have their own isolated under- and overpasses instead of using the public crossroads right next to them.  There are similar turnarounds on the OH and PA turnpikes for emergency or maintenance vehicles, but they are access ramps to/from crossroads.

OH Turnpike example:  https://maps.app.goo.gl/gzRq7GzEajwqLmGBA

PA Turnpike examples:  https://maps.app.goo.gl/MzeQAh25PzZBk29y6, https://maps.app.goo.gl/UMCTJttDa89vaP4T8
#4
Adding or dropping a lane at an exit is the best solution only if there's a good bit of traffic using that exit and it's easier to give exiting and entering traffic its own lane.  Otherwise, it's best to add and drop lanes on the left.
I see the latter more often around here where the extra lane gets added to the left as one approaches the next interchange.  And then in the other direction, the left lane ends a little ways past where the onramp merges.

I see that as generally better because you're not forcing 'thru' traffic to merge.
Though this gets more tricky in urban sections with busier exits so it's not always the best solution.
#5
Pacific Southwest / Re: Interstate 11 alignment, t...
Last post by michravera - Today at 04:36:57 PM
Quote from: Plutonic Panda on Today at 01:38:27 AM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on June 19, 2024, 04:32:57 PM
Quote from: michravera on June 19, 2024, 03:47:05 PM
Quote from: Max Rockatansky on June 19, 2024, 02:23:09 PM
Quote from: Plutonic Panda on June 19, 2024, 02:21:36 PMThat is really hard to believe there's 83 flights a week from Vegas to Reno. How is that sustainable? What is driving that demand?

A seven hour drive between the two.

... and with a decent interstate, it could be 5 hours. Staying on the east side of the Sierras has a certain whether benefit. Sacramento *IS* an option, except during ski season.


That's the thing, now that USA Parkway exists how much time would be saved?  There is a lot of existing 70 MPH territory along US 95 already.  Most of the slowdowns come in towns I think many would stop for food or a restroom break anyway.

I'm sure getting a better surface bypass for US 95A around Yerington would knock out much of the travel time that a full Interstate would. 
Speed limit 100MPH.

Lots of incremental improvements would help. But, none as much as a second carriageway. I've been in a light vehicle (VW Jetta) when a large truck passed in the other direction. That just doesn't happen on a divided road. I've felt less wake turbulence when a 737 passed me (although a few hundred meters away in and in the same direction) in an Cessna. It's not driving 85MPH having to pass a truck going 75 (or even 50) that irks me or is that unsafe. It's the opposite direction truck going at a decent speed that nearly blows me off the road. As I've said earlier "If they can't post it at 80 MPH, they'd be better off just making incremental improvements."
#6
Mid-South / Re: US-75 Expansion/Constructi...
Last post by MikieTimT - Today at 04:34:20 PM
Quote from: Bobby5280 on Today at 01:48:08 PM
Quote from: Road HogJust getting I-45 to Checotah is a win to me. We'll see how the rest plays out. US 69 is mostly upgradeable except for the portions that runs through towns. The politics will have to change, but I'm confident they will.

Atoka and Stringtown are apparently the main road blocks for converting all of US-69 to Interstate standards from the Red River to I-40. What ODOT can do is upgrade segments of US-69 elsewhere (since there is still so much work to do) and leave the Tushka-Stringtown segment to do last. Those towns are not growing (most of rural Oklahoma is shedding population). The political clout those towns apparently have is going to be eroded by aging residents dying off or moving elsewhere.

In the meantime the US-69 expressway in McAlester is slowly being converted into a freeway. The US-69 interchange with the Indian Nation Turnpike is going to be converted into a full cloverleaf. I could have sworn I saw plans somewhere regarding a freeway upgrade/bypass of Savanna to improve access to the Army Ammunition Plant there. If that work is done it could push an all-freeway US-69 from I-40 down to Kiowa. All the stuff on US-69 from the Red River up to Tushka would be easy to improve to Interstate standards.

Quote from: ZLothI don't see US-69 getting the traffic that US-75 between North Dallas and Atoka, Oklahoma, and the section between the Oklahoma state line and Atoka is combined US-69/US-75. Even in Atoka, US-69 going north is a mix of two and four lane roadway while US-75 becomes a two-lane road.

There is a shit-ton of trucks taking US-69 from the Red River to Big Cabin. Truck traffic picks up quite a lot on I-44 going East of the Big Cabin exit (and truck traffic is already pretty heavy coming from OKC). An improved, all limited access US-69 route would provide an effective relief route for OKC and Tulsa.

I wish that ODOT had trucks broken out on percentages like ARDOT does on AADT, and it would be nice if they included counts on the turnpikes and truck percentages as well.  It'd also be nice if they posted information post-COVID.  This is all I could find on AADT for Oklahoma.  It looks like it just doesn't make any sense at all to 4 lane US-75 north of Atoka and south of I-40.  It's barely any extra mileage at all to just continue up US-69 and take the Indian Nation Turnpike up to Henryetta, which are 4 lanes already, but really could use some bypasses in some speed trap towns.

https://www.odot.org/maps/aadt/2018/StateMapAADT.pdf

If US-75 south of Tulsa needed to be an Interstate, it'd make more sense as a *40/*44 3DI to Henryetta and leave it there.  US-69/75 south of Atoka certainly makes sense to be part of an extended I-45.
#7
Mid-South / Re: US-75 Expansion/Constructi...
Last post by MikieTimT - Today at 04:30:47 PM
Quote from: Bobby5280 on Today at 01:48:08 PM
Quote from: Road HogJust getting I-45 to Checotah is a win to me. We'll see how the rest plays out. US 69 is mostly upgradeable except for the portions that runs through towns. The politics will have to change, but I'm confident they will.

Atoka and Stringtown are apparently the main road blocks for converting all of US-69 to Interstate standards from the Red River to I-40. What ODOT can do is upgrade segments of US-69 elsewhere (since there is still so much work to do) and leave the Tushka-Stringtown segment to do last. Those towns are not growing (most of rural Oklahoma is shedding population). The political clout those towns apparently have is going to be eroded by aging residents dying off or moving elsewhere.

In the meantime the US-69 expressway in McAlester is slowly being converted into a freeway. The US-69 interchange with the Indian Nation Turnpike is going to be converted into a full cloverleaf. I could have sworn I saw plans somewhere regarding a freeway upgrade/bypass of Savanna to improve access to the Army Ammunition Plant there. If that work is done it could push an all-freeway US-69 from I-40 down to Kiowa. All the stuff on US-69 from the Red River up to Tushka would be easy to improve to Interstate standards.

Quote from: ZLothI don't see US-69 getting the traffic that US-75 between North Dallas and Atoka, Oklahoma, and the section between the Oklahoma state line and Atoka is combined US-69/US-75. Even in Atoka, US-69 going north is a mix of two and four lane roadway while US-75 becomes a two-lane road.

There is a shit-ton of trucks taking US-69 from the Red River to Big Cabin. Truck traffic picks up quite a lot on I-44 going East of the Big Cabin exit (and truck traffic is already pretty heavy coming from OKC). An improved, all limited access US-69 route would provide an effective relief route for OKC and Tulsa.

I wish that ODOT had trucks broken out on percentages like ARDOT does on AADT, and it would be nice if they included counts on the turnpikes and truck percentages as well.  It'd also be nice if they posted information post-COVID.  This is all I could find on AADT for Oklahoma.  It looks like it just doesn't make any sense at all to 4 lane US-75 north of Atoka and south of I-40.  It's barely any extra mileage at all to just continue up US-69 and take the Indian Nation Turnpike up to Henryetta, which are 4 lanes already, but really could use some bypasses in some speed trap towns.

https://www.odot.org/maps/aadt/2018/StateMapAADT.pdf

If US-75 south of Tulsa needed to be an Interstate, it'd make more sense as a *40/*44 3DI to Henryetta and leave it there.
#8
General Highway Talk / Re: What is this ramp on the N...
Last post by 1995hoo - Today at 04:25:39 PM
Quote from: Henry on Today at 03:34:22 PMI'm certain that this is unique to the NJTP, as other limited-access highways have at-grade U-turns serving the same purpose.

I'd guess the reason is because of the problem of how to make a U-turn between the "outer roadways" in the quad-carriageway section. Out of curiosity, I just dragged Google Maps through the southern part of the Turnpike (south of Exit 6), and the only two "restricted-access" overpasses I found were one that accesses Turnpike Authority offices and another that accesses a maintenance yard. The southernmost overpass I found that exists solely to allow for turning around is immediately to the north of US-206 and south of Exit 7 (if memory serves, the current turnaround overpass at that spot is located roughly where Exit 7 used to be prior to its relocation further north, and a look at Historic Aerials confirms that recollection). The fact that I can't find any of them further south further suggests to me that it's the quadruple-carriageway design that necessitates overpasses and underpasses for service vehicles.
#9
Off-Topic / Re: 24/7 OTA cartoon channel c...
Last post by triplemultiplex - Today at 04:15:47 PM
Gonna be on channel 27.3 for Madison.  They've already switch the channel over to 24/7 previews.
#10
General Highway Talk / Re: Roads You've Used More In ...
Last post by Buck87 - Today at 04:13:27 PM
I-75 in Kentucky, Tennessee and northern Georgia - almost always southbound

US 23 in Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia and Kentucky - almost always northbound
I-77 in South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia - almost always southbound

My sister lives in Georgia and trips to and from there are usually south on 75 and north on one of the other two (with several other routes involved depending on what other sightseeing stops, visits or clinches I may be doing on any given trip)

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