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 1 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:53:43 PM 
Started by TheStranger - Last post by sparker
LRN 232 and SSR 24 terminated at LRN 3/US 99E at a diamond interchange in Olivehurst. 

Would that actually be today's Feather River Boulevard exit off of Route 70?  (based on the earlier info of Feather River Boulevard being the original LRN 232/Route 24 and later Route 70)

If it's still signed as such, that would definitely be it.  Of course, the current route (CA 70) occupying the freeway now extends south to a directional "Y" interchange with CA 65 south of there built in the '70's; Feather River Blvd. is now under local maintenance. 

 2 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:49:45 PM 
Started by Hurricane Rex - Last post by Alps
21:44.1 5k = 6:59.75 mile. Woot.

 3 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:47:33 PM 
Started by In_Correct - Last post by Baloo Uriza
After about five minutes of hunting along Burnside to find where a train ran down the median, I found this GSV: https://goo.gl/maps/tw9C5t7iZLr. Also, good luck finding any aerial photography from that time period with a high enough resolution to see the lanes on that road.

And it's exactly how I thought. There is one lane plus a bike lane in each direction. It would appear that if there were no train tracks, there is enough ROW for four lanes plus a center turn lane, plus two bike lanes. So the light rail ate three lanes.

5 before, 4 after = three lanes difference?  I hope you went to private school, I'd hate to have paid for those math lessons.

Johnny has five apples. The city takes away three of his apples and gives him two oranges. How many apples does Johnny have?

Just because lanes might be reserved for a specific mode doesn't stop them from being lanes.  Giving people more options usually means people will tend to use those options when it fits their needs.  Taking away those options usually means everyone gets stuck making the same choice as everyone else because there's no other comparable option.  Hence why traffic got worse on I 635 after they took out the HOV lanes.  No reason to team up to avoid traffic anymore and the alternative toll lane that replaced it isn't worth the toll.

 4 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:43:20 PM 
Started by In_Correct - Last post by Duke87
After about five minutes of hunting along Burnside to find where a train ran down the median, I found this GSV: https://goo.gl/maps/tw9C5t7iZLr. Also, good luck finding any aerial photography from that time period with a high enough resolution to see the lanes on that road.

And it's exactly how I thought. There is one lane plus a bike lane in each direction. It would appear that if there were no train tracks, there is enough ROW for four lanes plus a center turn lane, plus two bike lanes. So the light rail ate three lanes.

5 before, 4 after = three lanes difference?  I hope you went to private school, I'd hate to have paid for those math lessons.

Johnny has five apples. The city takes away three of his apples and gives him two oranges. How many apples does Johnny have?

 5 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:40:57 PM 
Started by Scott5114 - Last post by TBKS1
Hope Mills >> Sikeston (Missouri)



I-55 (MO) Exit 67 by TheInstrumentalist, on Flickr

 6 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:39:09 PM 
Started by webny99 - Last post by davmillar
I have ADHD and a lot of my interests wax and wane over time, but I am definitely a road geek for life. My current project is at a nexus of roadgeekery, web development, and puzzles, which brought me here. I also like taking a road trip vacation at least once a year and geek out on the signage and traffic controls and such when I do.

 7 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:33:10 PM 
Started by hbelkins - Last post by Rothman
The natural-born conspiracy!  I am a believer now!

 8 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:32:31 PM 
Started by US71 - Last post by MikieTimT
Huh, and here I figured that they were wanting to do the new access road to XNA, so I thought that the western segment would go next.  Guess they haven't got all the ducks in a row yet for that road anyway.  Are they waiting on the extension of AR 265 to be completed before doing the next segment of the Springdale Bypass?

 9 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:23:33 PM 
Started by hbelkins - Last post by KeithE4Phx
You must be at minimum a second-generation U.S. citizen at birth and to the U.S. alone.

100% wrong.  A natural born citizen is one who was either born on US soil or who had one or more parents that were US citizens if born on foreign soil.


Examples of Presidents, Vice Presidents, and losing candidates for those offices that were in fact natural born citizens

Chester Arthur, our 21st President (1881-85).  He was James Garfield's VP who became President after Garfield's death in 1881.  His father was born in Ireland.  He was born in Vermont, which is all that matters.  He had to endure the 19th century version of birthers during the 1880 election.

Barry Goldwater, GOP candidate for President (1964).  Born in the Arizona Territory in 1909 (Arizona became a state in 1912).  Some people said he was ineligible because he wasn't born in a state.  He still got trounced by LBJ.

Spiro Agnew, Richard Nixon's VP (1969-73).  His father was born in Greece, and he was born in Maryland.  The latter was all that mattered, and there was no question about his eligibility from what I remember.  Had he not been a real crook and resigned as a result, he would have become the 38th President upon Nixon's resignation.

George Romney, early rival of Nixon in the 1968 election.  Born in Mexico to Mormon polygamist parents who were US citizens.  He didn't stay in the race long, but he was eligible.

Mitt Romney, GOP candidate for President (2012).  Son of George Romney, but was born in Michigan.  See above.

John McCain, GOP candidate for President (2008).  Born in the Panama Canal Zone (not considered a US territory, although we did control it) to US citizen parents who were stationed there at the time (1936).  Got as many questions about his eligibility as his opponent Barack Obama, at least early-on.  There were rumors that he'd actually been born in a hospital in Panama City, Panama.  Doesn't matter, since both of his parents were American.  If it did, no child of servicemen/women that were born overseas during deployment would be eligible to be President.

Barack Obama, 44th President (2009-2017).  His father was born in British East Africa (now Kenya).  Mother born in Kansas.  He was born in Hawaii in 1961, two years after it became a state.  Even if he really had been born in what is now Kenya instead of Hawaii, his mother was a natural-born US citizen, therefore he would also have been.

Ted Cruz, early rival of Donald Trump (2016).  Born in Canada to US citizens who were working there, although his father was born in Cuba.  Held dual citizenship until relinquishing his Canadian citizenship during the campaign.  I believe he had to do that to remain eligible, but because both of his parents were American citizens, he was considered a natural-born citizen.

Unfortunately, there has never been a Constitutional definition of Natural Born Citizen, but there is plenty of legal precedent going back to Arthur that defines it.

 10 
 on: July 22, 2018, 11:12:20 PM 
Started by Buffaboy - Last post by ipeters61
Dover area: DE-1 is our only full expressway and it gets to 6 lanes at the toll booths in Central Dover



Northern Delmarva Peninsula (I consider it to start at the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal south to the bottom of Kent County, DE): DE-1 at the Roth Bridge over the Canal at 6 lanes (with potential for expansion to 8).



All of Delaware: I-95 at the I-295/I-495/DE-141/US-202 interchange at 10 lanes for I-95 with another 2 lane C/D road southbound to access DE-141 and an extra 2 lanes for I-295 northbound exiting.



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