AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: People who call a vase a vozz  (Read 760 times)

bandit957

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1128
  • A natural gas bunk!

  • Age: 44
  • Location: Bellevue, KY
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 12:51:17 PM
People who call a vase a vozz
« on: October 11, 2017, 04:44:09 PM »

Why do some people call a vase a vozz?

This isn't something people do because it's funny. Classy people do this even in a serious context. Right now, there's a very educated character on 'America's Court' who keeps calling a wedding vase a vozz. If you take a guided tour of an art museum where a vase is displayed as an artwork, the very intelligent guide will often call it a vozz.

Does any regular person call it a vozz?
Logged
The highway to not having your teeth fall out...

Number of remaining teeth: https://goo.gl/maps/dgsWdCme9s72

kphoger

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6707
  • Location: Wichita, KS
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 04:58:24 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 04:55:55 PM »

It's the British way of saying the word. So, if you consider Brits to be regular people, then yes.

We Americans also try to talk with an English accent when we want to sound intelligent and sophisticated. So some people might say it that way for that reason.
Logged
Keep right except to pass.  Yes.  You.

Big John

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1439
  • Age: 50
  • Last Login: Today at 12:07:01 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 07:24:34 PM »

And Alex Trebek used "Vozz" in today's Jeopardy.
Logged

7/8

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2104
  • Civil Eng Student at Waterloo: Co-op this Fall

  • Age: 22
  • Location: The K in KW (Kitchener, ON)
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 10:53:13 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2017, 07:31:32 PM »

And Alex Trebek used "Vozz" in today's Jeopardy.

How did you already see it? It's just starting on my TV (I'm watching it on Yes TV - channel 23 on Rogers cable). :confused:
Logged


http://www.mob-rule.com/user/dscurtis
http://tm.teresco.org/user/?u=7_8

- Graduating in April. Where does the time go?
- Bring back the pre-Mike Harris King's Highway System!

Big John

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1439
  • Age: 50
  • Last Login: Today at 12:07:01 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2017, 07:37:58 PM »

And Alex Trebek used "Vozz" in today's Jeopardy.

How did you already see it? It's just starting on my TV (I'm watching it on Yes TV - channel 23 on Rogers cable). :confused:
In the US, it is syndicated to local markets and the local channel had it on at 6:00 CDT
Logged

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3012
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 11:27:00 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2017, 09:40:30 PM »

It's the British way of saying the word. So, if you consider Brits to be regular people, then yes.
We say it 'vahz', not 'vozz'. Rhymes with bras, not Oz.

An American failing at a British accent might say vozz. While we lengthen the 'a' differently from the rhymes-with-maze pronunciation, we don't make it an 'o', and we slightly soften the 'z' sound vs En-US, not double down on it.
Logged

7/8

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2104
  • Civil Eng Student at Waterloo: Co-op this Fall

  • Age: 22
  • Location: The K in KW (Kitchener, ON)
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 10:53:13 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2017, 10:35:31 PM »

It's the British way of saying the word. So, if you consider Brits to be regular people, then yes.
We say it 'vahz', not 'vozz'. Rhymes with bras, not Oz.

An American failing at a British accent might say vozz. While we lengthen the 'a' differently from the rhymes-with-maze pronunciation, we don't make it an 'o', and we slightly soften the 'z' sound vs En-US, not double down on it.

I'm guessing Big John (like myself) has the father-bother merger, which makes bras and Oz rhyme.

I notice that Alex Trebek normally pronunces hides his "canadian raising" (i.e. not raising the vowel in "about"), but occasionally he'll let a more Canadian sounding "about" slip by. He also pronunces his french very well!
Logged


http://www.mob-rule.com/user/dscurtis
http://tm.teresco.org/user/?u=7_8

- Graduating in April. Where does the time go?
- Bring back the pre-Mike Harris King's Highway System!

CtrlAltDel

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 465
  • Location: East Tennessee
  • Last Login: December 14, 2017, 03:58:16 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2017, 11:58:21 PM »

It's the British way of saying the word. So, if you consider Brits to be regular people, then yes.

And the Brits got it from the French, where "vahz" would be the normal way of pronouncing a word with that spelling.
Logged
Interstates clinched: 4, 57, 275 (IN-KY-OH), 465, 640

pumpkineater2

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 274
  • Jamie O' Neal lied. It does exist.

  • Age: 19
  • Location: Flagstaff, Arizona
  • Last Login: December 14, 2017, 03:33:29 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2017, 12:04:46 AM »

The way I always understood it was that a "Vozz" or "Vahs" was just a very fancy or expensive vase. :-D
Logged
Come ride with me to the distant shore...

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3012
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 11:27:00 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2017, 09:13:04 AM »

I'm guessing Big John (like myself) has the father-bother merger, which makes bras and Oz rhyme.
Of course, and I have most of the splits (trap-bath perhaps being a key one for vase's 'a' sound, though the whole of the UK says vase the same, but only the south has the trap-bath split) and only a few of the mergers (all of which are entirely different to En-US's).
And the Brits got it from the French, where "vahz" would be the normal way of pronouncing a word with that spelling.
Though we used to (until mid-19th century) say it like case, ie rhyming it with face, place, etc. I don't know whether the Americans did too, before changing it to rhyme with maze, phase, etc.
Logged

1995hoo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 8474
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 09:53:52 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2017, 09:25:22 AM »

I sometimes wonder if the people who say "vahz" or "vozz" are the same people who pronounce "envelope" as "on-velope" ("on" as in the word "on," like "turn on the lights").

I pronounce "envelope" with the first letter as a short "e" (as in "Ed"). I hardly ever use the word "vase" but would say it with a long "a" if I did. If I hear "vahz" or "vozz," it sounds like part of a male anatomical reference ("vas deferens").
Logged
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.

bmorrill

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 41
  • Location: West "By-God" Texas
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 12:03:30 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2017, 11:20:52 AM »

May be  "u" vs. "non-u" thing.
Logged

TheArkansasRoadgeek

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 553
  • The Dude

  • Age: 18
  • Location: Fort Smith, Arkansas
  • Last Login: December 12, 2017, 05:53:30 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2017, 12:13:47 PM »

Now vozzes? What's next, "People Who Call The Toilet a commode, pot, johnn, loo"
Logged
Well, that's just like your opinion man...

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10928
  • Celebrating another day that Hillary isn't prez.

  • Age: 56
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 10:14:08 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2017, 12:53:17 PM »

Just don't throw the vohz in the gar-bajz.
Logged

CNGL-Leudimin

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1831
  • Posting from the future!

  • Age: 24
  • Location: Across the pond
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 06:27:00 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2017, 07:56:35 AM »

I almost screwed up when I read the title of this thread. I thought of a glass (of water, said vaso in Spanish) instead of a jarrón (Which is what "vase" actually translates to).
Logged
I can provide a photo of the back of a fridge if anyone wants to check if something is uglier than one :sombrero:.

All times Eastern. Don't be surprised if I go to sleep at 6 p.m. :-P.

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3012
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 11:27:00 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2017, 09:08:42 AM »

I sometimes wonder if the people who say "vahz" or "vozz" are the same people who pronounce "envelope" as "on-velope" ("on" as in the word "on," like "turn on the lights").
Maybe in America? Not here in Blighty.
May be  "u" vs. "non-u" thing.
Surely more a "u" and "non-u" vs "trying to be u" thing? Many of these things 'vozz', 'gah-beige', 'on-ve-lope' sound like Americans trying to speak as if they are upstairs in Downton Abbey and getting it wrong.
Logged

GaryV

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 637
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 08:32:58 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2017, 05:00:58 PM »

It's the British way of saying the word. So, if you consider Brits to be regular people, then yes.

And the Brits got it from the French, where "vahz" would be the normal way of pronouncing a word with that spelling.

Except they don't pronounce most French words the way the French do.  Take fillet, for example.  In France and the US, the last syllable is "lay".  In Britain and Canada, it's "let".
Logged

CtrlAltDel

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 465
  • Location: East Tennessee
  • Last Login: December 14, 2017, 03:58:16 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2017, 08:18:19 PM »

It's the British way of saying the word. So, if you consider Brits to be regular people, then yes.

And the Brits got it from the French, where "vahz" would be the normal way of pronouncing a word with that spelling.

Except they don't pronounce most French words the way the French do.  Take fillet, for example.  In France and the US, the last syllable is "lay".  In Britain and Canada, it's "let".

True (although in French, the spelling of your particular example is filet). That said, it can a bit random which words retain their Frenchiness, and which don't, on either side of the Atlantic. For example, in the UK, it's not unheard of to pronounce garage much like carriage, which is pretty much never done in the US. Then, of course, there are the words that are pronounced in a Frenchy way in both places as well as neither.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2017, 08:26:30 PM by CtrlAltDel »
Logged
Interstates clinched: 4, 57, 275 (IN-KY-OH), 465, 640

1995hoo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 8474
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Fairfax County, Virginia
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 09:53:52 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #18 on: October 13, 2017, 11:13:40 PM »

I sometimes wonder if the people who say "vahz" or "vozz" are the same people who pronounce "envelope" as "on-velope" ("on" as in the word "on," like "turn on the lights").
Maybe in America? Not here in Blighty.
May be  "u" vs. "non-u" thing.
Surely more a "u" and "non-u" vs "trying to be u" thing? Many of these things 'vozz', 'gah-beige', 'on-ve-lope' sound like Americans trying to speak as if they are upstairs in Downton Abbey and getting it wrong.

Then you have a friend of mine who tries to use British terminology and spelling but gets it wrong when he refers to pro sports leagues conducting a "draught" every year (as in "the NFL Draught").
Logged
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3012
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 11:27:00 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2017, 06:32:42 AM »

That said, it can a bit random which words retain their Frenchiness
You mean regain their Frenchiness - they lost it and then got it back (possibly more than once) when the richer people got obsessed with French stuff again, forgetting the horrors of 'The Norman Yoke'.

Want a reason why British food has a reputation for sucking? It's because the higher-class stuff until about 10-15 years ago was copying terrible higher-class French food (which somehow is overhyped worldwide) while cutting back on the garlic that is there to really hide the lack of fresh ingredients that they couldn't get easily in Paris. And that the lower-class stuff (in France too) is simple fayre with good ingredients that didn't have the good ingredients for quite some time (both the cities problem, and then the rationing, supermarket and canned problem post-war).

Also, being north of the potato-tomato, butter-olive oil, and beer-wine lines was seen as inferior: Britain and northern France fall there, but southern France was south of the lines (which added to the rotting food hidden in sauces issue at Versailles/Paris - they shipped stuff from the south, rather than nearby).
"the NFL Draught"
Well it's not a unpublished attempt, is it? ;)

We only have the concept of sports teams taking turns to pick people to hire wrt America, so we would spell it draft.
Logged

GaryV

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 637
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 08:32:58 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #20 on: October 14, 2017, 07:32:04 AM »


We only have the concept of sports teams taking turns to pick people to hire wrt America, so we would spell it draft.

What spelling would you use to mean military conscription?  I believe that's the origin of the term for sports selections.
Logged

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3012
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 11:27:00 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #21 on: October 14, 2017, 07:48:48 AM »

What spelling would you use to mean military conscription?
c-o-n-s-c-r-i-p-t-i-o-n ;)

Unless it's the Vietnam draft and the dodging thereof, because same reasons as American Sports Drafts, it's American term for an American thing (the 'nam draft specifically, rather than conscription in general).
« Last Edit: October 14, 2017, 07:52:45 AM by english si »
Logged

CtrlAltDel

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 465
  • Location: East Tennessee
  • Last Login: December 14, 2017, 03:58:16 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #22 on: October 14, 2017, 09:28:01 PM »

That said, it can a bit random which words retain their Frenchiness
You mean regain their Frenchiness - they lost it and then got it back (possibly more than once) when the richer people got obsessed with French stuff again, forgetting the horrors of 'The Norman Yoke'.

This is a good clarification. Thanks.

Want a reason why British food has a reputation for sucking? It's because the higher-class stuff until about 10-15 years ago was copying terrible higher-class French food (which somehow is overhyped worldwide) while cutting back on the garlic that is there to really hide the lack of fresh ingredients that they couldn't get easily in Paris. And that the lower-class stuff (in France too) is simple fayre with good ingredients that didn't have the good ingredients for quite some time (both the cities problem, and then the rationing, supermarket and canned problem post-war).

Also, being north of the potato-tomato, butter-olive oil, and beer-wine lines was seen as inferior: Britain and northern France fall there, but southern France was south of the lines (which added to the rotting food hidden in sauces issue at Versailles/Paris - they shipped stuff from the south, rather than nearby).

With this food part, though, you seem a bit bitter.

Logged
Interstates clinched: 4, 57, 275 (IN-KY-OH), 465, 640

yakra

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 979
  • Location: Area Code 207
  • Last Login: December 14, 2017, 03:36:22 AM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2017, 03:17:09 AM »

The only thing I'm capable of thinking of:
Logged
"Officer, I'm always careful to drive the speed limit no matter where I am and that's what I was doin'." Said "No, you weren't," she said, "Yes, I was." He said, "Madam, I just clocked you at 22 MPH," and she said "That's the speed limit," he said "No ma'am, that's the route numbah!"  - Gary Crocker

Rothman

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3089
  • Last Login: December 15, 2017, 11:39:56 PM
Re: People who call a vase a vozz
« Reply #24 on: October 20, 2017, 11:49:13 AM »

All I know is that I now want "vozz" to be the official spelling.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.