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Author Topic: Nevada  (Read 34941 times)

Plutonic Panda

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #125 on: May 31, 2021, 09:52:51 AM »

I actually really like that idea. A lot of DOT accounts I follow are to simply stay informed about project information and it will be nice not having the main account cluttered up.
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roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #126 on: June 13, 2021, 08:25:32 PM »

Just read about a bill that passed through our legislative session...many minor traffic violations have been decriminalized and will now be civil infractions.

Most minor traffic violations decriminalized in Nevada, Las Vegas Review-Journal, 6/08/2021
Quote
CARSON CITY — Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak on Tuesday signed a bill [AB 116] into law that decriminalizes most minor traffic offenses, classifying them instead as civil infractions.

The reclassification means that jail time would be off the table for a large swath of traffic offenses, such as minor speeding, violating an HOV lane restriction, making an illegal turn, not wearing a seat belt, or driving without a child safety seat.

When traffic offenses are considered criminal misdemeanors, a court could issue a warrant if the person does not appear in court or fails to pay their fine on time.
<...>
The bill marked the fifth time lawmakers in Nevada had pushed some form legislation to reclassify minor traffic infractions in the last decade. This time, the bill faced little resistance in the Legislature and passed with only one “no” vote [in both] the Assembly and the Senate.
<...>
Sisolak on Tuesday also signed Senate Bill 219, which removes a court’s authority to suspend a person’s driver’s license or prevent them from applying for one based on an unpaid fine, administrative assessment or other type of fee.
<...>
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

nexus73

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #127 on: June 14, 2021, 08:07:10 AM »

Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

Rick
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US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #128 on: June 14, 2021, 09:34:17 AM »

Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

The legislation is a growing trend. The article notes that Nevada joins 37 other states that have already done this.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

Sub-Urbanite

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #129 on: June 17, 2021, 10:57:49 AM »

Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

Rick

It'd be great if this was handled fairly, but the most recent data (which admittedly is 18 years old) shows that Black and Hispanic drivers were more likely to be pulled over than whites or Asians, and, more starkly, Black and Hispanic residents made up 2/3rds of Las Vegas' arrest warrants for unpaid traffic violations.

Also notably, when Carson City adopted this policy in 2019, collection on unpaid traffic fines went up.

Basically, it doesn't make sense to throw someone in jail for three days and have them deal with the disruption that comes from that, if we want people to actually pay their fines.
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nexus73

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #130 on: June 18, 2021, 09:51:09 AM »

Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

Rick

It'd be great if this was handled fairly, but the most recent data (which admittedly is 18 years old) shows that Black and Hispanic drivers were more likely to be pulled over than whites or Asians, and, more starkly, Black and Hispanic residents made up 2/3rds of Las Vegas' arrest warrants for unpaid traffic violations.

Also notably, when Carson City adopted this policy in 2019, collection on unpaid traffic fines went up.

Basically, it doesn't make sense to throw someone in jail for three days and have them deal with the disruption that comes from that, if we want people to actually pay their fines.

I had a buddy (who was white) in the Air Force, back in the Seventies, who did not pay his fines on time, so when he was caught doing something wrong while driving, off to jail he went in San Diego County!  That got his attention. 

If 2/3'rds of blacks and Hispanics are nonpayers, then the number you quoted is just reflecting the situation.  One would have to know what each race's behavior was like in order to truly know what is going on.

I have a stepnephew, also white, that lives in Vegas.  He had accumulated a few thousand dollars in unpaid fines.  Tossing him into the hoosegow also got his attention.  Eventually he did straighten out his life but it took some judicial action before he did.

Why let bad behaviors go unpunished?  Driving is a privilege, not a right. 

Rick

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US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

roadfro

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #131 on: June 18, 2021, 10:28:25 AM »

Scofflaws are going to love that bit of legislation.  I guess that fines which go unpaid will wind up submitted to a collections agency.

Rick

It'd be great if this was handled fairly, but the most recent data (which admittedly is 18 years old) shows that Black and Hispanic drivers were more likely to be pulled over than whites or Asians, and, more starkly, Black and Hispanic residents made up 2/3rds of Las Vegas' arrest warrants for unpaid traffic violations.

Also notably, when Carson City adopted this policy in 2019, collection on unpaid traffic fines went up.

Basically, it doesn't make sense to throw someone in jail for three days and have them deal with the disruption that comes from that, if we want people to actually pay their fines.

I had a buddy (who was white) in the Air Force, back in the Seventies, who did not pay his fines on time, so when he was caught doing something wrong while driving, off to jail he went in San Diego County!  That got his attention. 

If 2/3'rds of blacks and Hispanics are nonpayers, then the number you quoted is just reflecting the situation.  One would have to know what each race's behavior was like in order to truly know what is going on.

I have a stepnephew, also white, that lives in Vegas.  He had accumulated a few thousand dollars in unpaid fines.  Tossing him into the hoosegow also got his attention.  Eventually he did straighten out his life but it took some judicial action before he did.

Why let bad behaviors go unpunished?  Driving is a privilege, not a right. 

Rick

Asking this question at the risk of derailing this thread of discussion... but what do you mean by the bolded statement? Generalizing by race or ethnicity should not be necessary in the context of individuals' traffic law violations and their ability to resolve them.

I agree generally with not letting bad behaviors go unpunished, but misdemeanors and possible jail time for minor traffic violations doesn't seem like the way to go. Now, if someone racks up multiple traffic infractions and doesn't pay them (or do some equivalent amount of community service if unable to pay, assuming that is an option), I would say that additional steps should be taken at that point.
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Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

nexus73

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #132 on: June 18, 2021, 01:13:24 PM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
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US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

Alps

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #133 on: June 18, 2021, 03:47:18 PM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

nexus73

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #134 on: June 19, 2021, 10:17:52 AM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

While living in Tangipahoa Parish (Louisiana) back in the second half of the Nineties, I saw work groups from the county jail doing various cleaning tasks.  It was rare to see a white person despite the parish population being rather evenly split between black and white.  That was something I had not expected to see.

Black thug culture had taken over the outdoors so much that children never played outside nor did any of them ever go trick or treating on Hallowe'en.  Drug dealers gathered in packs both in the cities and countryside.  Police actually protected the drug trade so they could have informers. which the Hammond LA police chief said accounted for 99% of crimes solved.  Black neighborhoods looked totally run down while the mostly white neighborhoods had the classic middle class look.  Hammond and Ponchatoula high schools had to be moved out of town and the campuses closed to hold down the troubles.

Very Third World were the conditions.  Oh well, at least the food was good. 

Rick
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US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

Alps

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #135 on: June 19, 2021, 10:32:34 PM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

While living in Tangipahoa Parish (Louisiana) back in the second half of the Nineties, I saw work groups from the county jail doing various cleaning tasks.  It was rare to see a white person despite the parish population being rather evenly split between black and white.  That was something I had not expected to see.

Black thug culture had taken over the outdoors so much that children never played outside nor did any of them ever go trick or treating on Hallowe'en.  Drug dealers gathered in packs both in the cities and countryside.  Police actually protected the drug trade so they could have informers. which the Hammond LA police chief said accounted for 99% of crimes solved.  Black neighborhoods looked totally run down while the mostly white neighborhoods had the classic middle class look.  Hammond and Ponchatoula high schools had to be moved out of town and the campuses closed to hold down the troubles.

Very Third World were the conditions.  Oh well, at least the food was good. 

Rick
I'm not sure what you're getting at. You mention thug culture and third world conditions - please elaborate on why you are not a racist this Juneteenth.

nexus73

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #136 on: June 20, 2021, 08:39:21 AM »

What you "bolded" refers to accumulating the statistics.  If the stats match up rather closely to the amount of people present in those races, then we are not dealing with racism.  If the stats are way different, then the question becomes one of racism vs cultural approaches, which would be a Pretty Tough One to answer in terms of pure numbers.

Rick
Not necessary to know. If minorities are being disproportionately jailed to their overall numbers, there is a problem rooted in racism. If the jail sentences are actually proportional to the crimes being commited, that informs you that the problem is socially endemic and we need to develop equity over generations. If the sentences are not proportional, then you have systemic racism. The truth is in between and we have both.

While living in Tangipahoa Parish (Louisiana) back in the second half of the Nineties, I saw work groups from the county jail doing various cleaning tasks.  It was rare to see a white person despite the parish population being rather evenly split between black and white.  That was something I had not expected to see.

Black thug culture had taken over the outdoors so much that children never played outside nor did any of them ever go trick or treating on Hallowe'en.  Drug dealers gathered in packs both in the cities and countryside.  Police actually protected the drug trade so they could have informers. which the Hammond LA police chief said accounted for 99% of crimes solved.  Black neighborhoods looked totally run down while the mostly white neighborhoods had the classic middle class look.  Hammond and Ponchatoula high schools had to be moved out of town and the campuses closed to hold down the troubles.

Very Third World were the conditions.  Oh well, at least the food was good. 

Rick
I'm not sure what you're getting at. You mention thug culture and third world conditions - please elaborate on why you are not a racist this Juneteenth.

These are just mentions of the reality that was in place about a quarter century ago.  My wife was black (she died of a seizure back in 2009) by the way so take your "woke" self out for a reality check by going there to see what is going on.

Rick
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Kniwt

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #137 on: December 06, 2021, 02:06:23 PM »

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that a new 2.75-mile arterial will be built across the booming Inspirada area of Henderson, with a possible connection to I-15 in the 2026-2030 time frame.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/news-columns/road-warrior/new-road-to-provide-traffic-relief-to-booming-west-henderson-2491709/

Quote
Construction on the $38 million, 2.75-mile Via Nobila arterial road project began on Nov. 1 and is expected to wrap up by the end of 2022, according to the city of Henderson.

The scope of the project calls for Via Nobila to consist of two lanes in each direction, with underground water lines, sewer, storm drains, infrastructure for traffic signals, and a bridge that will cross over a wash along the planned road.

A full traffic signal will be installed and operating at the future intersection of Via Nobila and Via Inspirada.

... Not part of the current scope of work is a future I-15 interchange for Via Nobila. Henderson officials have been working with NDOT, the Regional Transportation Commission and Clark County on initial planning for the interchange.

The parties are in the early design phase of the I-15 interchange, which isn’t expected to be under construction until between 2026 and 2030, according to the State Transportation Improvement Plan.

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brad2971

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #138 on: December 06, 2021, 06:01:55 PM »

The Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that a new 2.75-mile arterial will be built across the booming Inspirada area of Henderson, with a possible connection to I-15 in the 2026-2030 time frame.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/news-columns/road-warrior/new-road-to-provide-traffic-relief-to-booming-west-henderson-2491709/

Quote
Construction on the $38 million, 2.75-mile Via Nobila arterial road project began on Nov. 1 and is expected to wrap up by the end of 2022, according to the city of Henderson.

The scope of the project calls for Via Nobila to consist of two lanes in each direction, with underground water lines, sewer, storm drains, infrastructure for traffic signals, and a bridge that will cross over a wash along the planned road.

A full traffic signal will be installed and operating at the future intersection of Via Nobila and Via Inspirada.

... Not part of the current scope of work is a future I-15 interchange for Via Nobila. Henderson officials have been working with NDOT, the Regional Transportation Commission and Clark County on initial planning for the interchange.

The parties are in the early design phase of the I-15 interchange, which isn’t expected to be under construction until between 2026 and 2030, according to the State Transportation Improvement Plan.



I wonder if NDOT and the city of Henderson will do with the future Via Nobila interchange on I-15 what the city of Lone Tree and CDOT did with the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange on I-25. When the Ridgegate Pkwy interchange was constructed, CDOT got rid of the very substandard Exit 191 and built a frontage road (Havana St) on the east side of I-25 to connect Ridgegate Pkwy with Castle Pines Pkwy (Exit 188).

In the case of this future Via Nobila interchange, NDOT could easily get rid of the Sloan exit and have everyone use Las Vegas Blvd to reach those businesses at that exit while building the new Via Nobila interchange to the correct standards.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Nevada
« Reply #139 on: December 06, 2021, 11:14:49 PM »

I wonder if they will extend the Bicentennial Parkway to it. What a weird intersection that is, the bicentennial parkway and Via Inspirada road is. The infrastructure in this is area is….. interesting
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