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North Carolina's Famed Truck-Scalping Bridge Nears 100 Recorded Crashes

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edwaleni:

--- Quote from: CtrlAltDel on May 05, 2022, 12:53:43 PM ---
--- Quote from: wdcrft63 on May 04, 2022, 06:27:57 PM ---
--- Quote from: plain on May 04, 2022, 03:46:04 PM ---Oh this reminds me, I meant to post this somewhere the other day but forgot so I'll post it here.

This is sort of the opposite: a case of an over height train hitting an automobile bridge :crazy:

https://www.wric.com/news/local-news/richmond/train-derails-near-scotts-addition-in-richmond/

--- End quote ---
Thanks; I grew up in Richmond and recognize this location. When trucks hit the bridge in Durham, they stop. It's a lot harder to stop a train.

--- End quote ---

It looks like that particular bit of bridge has been struck before or something.

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Easier to lower the tracks than raise the bridge. Surprised they haven't done that yet.

Dirt Roads:

--- Quote from: plain on May 04, 2022, 03:46:04 PM ---Oh this reminds me, I meant to post this somewhere the other day but forgot so I'll post it here.

This is sort of the opposite: a case of an over height train hitting an automobile bridge :crazy:

https://www.wric.com/news/local-news/richmond/train-derails-near-scotts-addition-in-richmond/

--- End quote ---

You have misinterpreted the visual information, but indeed some of the containers hit the bottom of the bridge.  The containers appear to have collided with the bridge stringers after the railcars derailed and the load rotated.  But this does emphasize something important about railroading and trucking.  The concept of "dynamic envelope" assumes a certain amount of vertical play due to load rotation (typically assumed as a worst-case single point failure of any suspension element).  But if the load rotates beyond that for any reason, "stuff" outside of the dynamic envelope is prone to getting smacked. 

On the railroad, we have a tighter dynamic envelope near track level on the assumption that we need to mount low-height equipment (such as switch machines and dwarf signals) closer to the tracks than would be permitted if those thingys were taller.  That is something you don't see much on roads.  But the same general rules apply to overheight trucks.  If a semi-truck has a suspension failure at the back end of its trailer, the opposite corner will raise up a few inches higher and potentially smack a low clearance obstruction (such as the Gregson Street Canopener).

I have seen all of the recordings on 11foot8.com prior to increasing the bridge clearance and don't recall any such collisions where one side of a truck got ripped worse than the other side.  But as frequent as the Gregson Canopener has been hit in the past, I'd bet that there's a good example somewhere in the collection.


--- Quote from: CtrlAltDel on May 05, 2022, 12:53:43 PM ---It looks like that particular bit of bridge has been struck before or something.

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What looks to be a burn mark here is probably an attempt to cover up graffiti on the bridge.  Cheap paint doesn't last very long.

CtrlAltDel:

--- Quote from: Dirt Roads on May 13, 2022, 11:18:31 AM ---What looks to be a burn mark here is probably an attempt to cover up graffiti on the bridge.  Cheap paint doesn't last very long.

--- End quote ---

That would definitely explain it.

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