AARoads Forum

Non-Road Boards => Off-Topic => Topic started by: roadman65 on May 10, 2022, 02:40:54 PM

Title: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: roadman65 on May 10, 2022, 02:40:54 PM
Back in CB Radios days when they were ever so popular, there was Emergency Chanel 9 which was monitored by law enforcement 24/7.  What irked me about it was the way dispatchers responded after a distress call.

Instead of asking the caller, how May I be of assistance?  Or saying with a smile on their face ( yes you can hear a smile on radio) “ This is Smithtown Police, how may we help.” You would get straight forward response “ Please describe the nature of your problem”

  Although not rude in tone, it’s still not sounding helpful but like you were wasting his free time at the station and like his thinking mode was “just say it and and end it. I don’t want to be bothered”

What straight forward phrase annoy you in common talk, exclude this forum please..

Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 10, 2022, 03:01:14 PM
“It is what it is. 
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 03:04:59 PM
"...and I'll be taking care of you this evening."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Takumi on May 10, 2022, 03:10:02 PM
“Circle back”

When a call is “parked” instead of “on hold”.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 03:12:29 PM
Did you find everything you were looking for OK?

Well, I didn't see any drinking straws other than the store brand.  I don't know if the PfangleLife brand is just out of stock, or if you stopped carrying them, or what.

Hmm, yeah, I'm not sure.


Huh?  Don't you care that I didn't find everything I was looking for?  Don't even bother asking me if you're not prepared do something about a No answer.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 10, 2022, 03:17:37 PM
Did you find everything you were looking for OK?

Well, I didn't see any drinking straws other than the store brand.  I don't know if the PfangleLife brand is just out of stock, or if you stopped carrying them, or what.

Hmm, yeah, I'm not sure.


Huh?  Don't you care that I didn't find everything I was looking for?  Don't even bother asking me if you're not prepared do something about a No answer.

Fucking Pfangle is always out of the generic PfangleLife brand generic products.  I still can’t find PfangleLife splintered toilet paper. 
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 03:33:41 PM
Fucking Pfangle

You misspelled the store name.  It's spelled Pfucking Pfangle+.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 10, 2022, 03:46:31 PM
Fucking Pfangle

You misspelled the store name.  It's spelled Pfucking Pfangle+.

Yes, I think that I was autocorrected.  Pfuckint Pfangle is of course the well known neighborhood market variant of the big box Pfangle stores.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 03:50:41 PM
Yes, I think that I was autocorrected.

(https://cdn.someecards.com/someecards/usercards/MjAxMy0wMjIwOWExYjgzYzBhZDcy.png)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: JayhawkCO on May 10, 2022, 03:51:28 PM
I hate autocarrot.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: formulanone on May 10, 2022, 04:02:05 PM
Don't even bother asking me if you're not prepared do something about a No answer.

For $8-10/hour, they're trying extra hard to not make fun of the average shopper's haircut, questionable purchase, or poor wardrobe choices in that moment.

After seeing the average person at Wal-Mart, and knowing they're even more average than that, I know I'd lose my job in the first four hours for that kind of pay.

(I knew my grocery store pretty well after about 6 months, and I was 16 years old.)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: jeffandnicole on May 10, 2022, 04:11:19 PM
“It is what it is. 

This times infinity.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 04:14:39 PM
After seeing the average person at Wal-Mart, and knowing they're even more average than that, I know I'd lose my job in the first four hours for that kind of pay.

My first job was in retail.  Specifically, I pushed shopping carts full-time at a Target in the soccer mom western suburbs of Chicago (Roosevelt Road & County Farm Road).  One day, I had been out pushing carts in the rain for about six hours.  A lady came in, started to grab a cart, quickly removed her hand, and exclaimed in shocked surprise:  Ooh, they're all wet!.  I said wryly, It's raining outside.

I came pretty close to losing my job over that remark—perhaps because my manager didn't believe her, that I might be so rude.  (He didn't know me well enough, I guess.)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: formulanone on May 10, 2022, 04:16:11 PM
“It is what it is. 

This times infinity.

Ever tried to explain things to people who are in that wide spectrum of "don't want to hear an answer", "don't care about the answer", "don't want an excuse", and are "going to bitch about it anyway"?

That's what that line is good for.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: abefroman329 on May 10, 2022, 04:19:08 PM
After seeing the average person at Wal-Mart, and knowing they're even more average than that, I know I'd lose my job in the first four hours for that kind of pay.

My first job was in retail.  Specifically, I pushed shopping carts full-time at a Target in the soccer mom western suburbs of Chicago (Roosevelt Road & County Farm Road).  One day, I had been out pushing carts in the rain for about six hours.  A lady came in, started to grab a cart, quickly removed her hand, and exclaimed in shocked surprise:  Ooh, they're all wet!.  I said wryly, It's raining outside.

I came pretty close to losing my job over that remark—perhaps because my manager didn't believe her, that I might be so rude.  (He didn't know me well enough, I guess.)
I was a cashier at a Target in a soccer mom-y suburb of Atlanta.  To this day, I refuse to hand a half-eaten candy bar to a cashier and say "ring this up."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: abefroman329 on May 10, 2022, 04:21:23 PM
Back in CB Radios days when they were ever so popular, there was Emergency Chanel 9 which was monitored by law enforcement 24/7.  What irked me about it was the way dispatchers responded after a distress call.

Instead of asking the caller, how May I be of assistance?  Or saying with a smile on their face ( yes you can hear a smile on radio) “ This is Smithtown Police, how may we help.” You would get straight forward response “ Please describe the nature of your problem”

  Although not rude in tone, it’s still not sounding helpful but like you were wasting his free time at the station and like his thinking mode was “just say it and and end it. I don’t want to be bothered”

What straight forward phrase annoy you in common talk, exclude this forum please..
In fairness, they probably did this because, in an emergency, seconds count, and there's no time to waste on pleasantries.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 10, 2022, 04:21:39 PM
After seeing the average person at Wal-Mart, and knowing they're even more average than that, I know I'd lose my job in the first four hours for that kind of pay.

My first job was in retail.  Specifically, I pushed shopping carts full-time at a Target in the soccer mom western suburbs of Chicago (Roosevelt Road & County Farm Road).  One day, I had been out pushing carts in the rain for about six hours.  A lady came in, started to grab a cart, quickly removed her hand, and exclaimed in shocked surprise:  Ooh, they're all wet!.  I said wryly, It's raining outside.

I came pretty close to losing my job over that remark—perhaps because my manager didn't believe her, that I might be so rude.  (He didn't know me well enough, I guess.)

I pushed carts for about three months in a Phoenix summer at Target before I transferred to their security department.  At the time I was training for police physical agility exams and wanted it get my weight down 30 pounds so I wouldn’t have to bench press 215 pounds twelve times (Phoenix PD required you bench your body weight 12 times in a set and I could only do 5-7 reps at 215 pounds).  I found the best way to avoid having to be friendly to customers was to stay in constant motion.  I found this could be accomplished by way of pushing 8 carts from each parking lot row rather than using the cart pusher machine.  I was getting a solid 15-20 miles of waking in every day on top of the running I was already doing in the morning.  I overshot my weight loss goal and dropped 42 pounds during that three months.  Nobody really ever bothered me so long as I appeared to be busy, probably the easiest job on the mind I’ve ever had. 
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: jeffandnicole on May 10, 2022, 04:33:48 PM
Back in CB Radios days when they were ever so popular, there was Emergency Chanel 9 which was monitored by law enforcement 24/7.  What irked me about it was the way dispatchers responded after a distress call.

Instead of asking the caller, how May I be of assistance?  Or saying with a smile on their face ( yes you can hear a smile on radio) “ This is Smithtown Police, how may we help.” You would get straight forward response “ Please describe the nature of your problem”

  Although not rude in tone, it’s still not sounding helpful but like you were wasting his free time at the station and like his thinking mode was “just say it and and end it. I don’t want to be bothered”

What straight forward phrase annoy you in common talk, exclude this forum please..
In fairness, they probably did this because, in an emergency, seconds count, and there's no time to waste on pleasantries.

The ones I've talked with usually answer "911 what's your emergency?".

I bet if they said "This is Smithtown Police, how may we help", The person would often say "I have an emergency...".

It just helps get to the point much quicker.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Scott5114 on May 10, 2022, 05:00:05 PM
Back in CB Radios days when they were ever so popular, there was Emergency Chanel 9 which was monitored by law enforcement 24/7.  What irked me about it was the way dispatchers responded after a distress call.

Instead of asking the caller, how May I be of assistance?  Or saying with a smile on their face ( yes you can hear a smile on radio) “ This is Smithtown Police, how may we help.” You would get straight forward response “ Please describe the nature of your problem”

  Although not rude in tone, it’s still not sounding helpful but like you were wasting his free time at the station and like his thinking mode was “just say it and and end it. I don’t want to be bothered”

What straight forward phrase annoy you in common talk, exclude this forum please..
In fairness, they probably did this because, in an emergency, seconds count, and there's no time to waste on pleasantries.

I mean, they could shorten it even further: "Say your problem!"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: JayhawkCO on May 10, 2022, 05:01:25 PM
Saying "Hello" instead of getting to the point when pinging someone on Teams.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: 7/8 on May 10, 2022, 05:09:19 PM
Saying "Hello" instead of getting to the point when pinging someone on Teams.

Yes to this one! I have a friend that'll often just write "Yo" in a message and wait for me to respond before elaborating. I find it pretty annoying.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: wriddle082 on May 10, 2022, 05:17:43 PM
When a call is “parked” instead of “on hold”.

I always thought parking a call was a different process than just placing on hold.  More like putting it in a transfer portal where it can be picked up at any station, and not just the intended recipient’s station.  I know, that sounds a lot like hold, but I’m pretty sure it’s different.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 06:43:10 PM

Saying "Hello" instead of getting to the point when pinging someone on Teams.

Yes to this one! I have a friend that'll often just write "Yo" in a message and wait for me to respond before elaborating. I find it pretty annoying.

I would so totally not respond to that.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 10, 2022, 06:58:48 PM

Saying "Hello" instead of getting to the point when pinging someone on Teams.

Yes to this one! I have a friend that'll often just write "Yo" in a message and wait for me to respond before elaborating. I find it pretty annoying.

I would so totally not respond to that.

For a long time I would answer the phone with “go” or “go ahead.”  Most people just aren’t prepared to just drop right into what they need to say, they want to dance around it for awhile.  I prefer just getting to the point, much to the annoyance of people I worked with and my wife (the latter is why I toned it down).
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: formulanone on May 10, 2022, 07:09:35 PM
“Circle back”

"I'm unprepared to answer this important/vague question at this moment because I only apportioned 28.75 minutes for this Zoom call."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: roadman65 on May 10, 2022, 07:46:20 PM
Can I help you. 


I find it old and sending out a signal to you the shopper, that they are going to con you into a sale.


Then good ole Murthy’s law. When you do need help the sales people are nowhere in sight, and if you find a sales person or associate, they turn out to be another shopper dressed professional to the store’s uniform policy.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Big John on May 10, 2022, 07:54:22 PM
I have a friend that'll often just write "Yo" in a message and wait for me to respond before elaborating. I find it pretty annoying.
I responded  ...Yo Ma to that.  He was not amused with that.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: thspfc on May 10, 2022, 08:00:40 PM
“Not a _______ but”

Means one of two things: 1) the following comment is not worth listening to, or 2) the person speaking is so obsessed with something (most often a sports team) that they can’t go one sentence without letting you know about it.

“No offense but”

If it’s offensive then it’s offensive. If it’s not then it’s not.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: abefroman329 on May 10, 2022, 08:15:53 PM
“Not a _______ but”

Means one of two things: 1) the following comment is not worth listening to, or 2) the person speaking is so obsessed with something (most often a sports team) that they can’t go one sentence without letting you know about it.
You mean like "I'm no fan of puppies, but [several paragraphs about how awesome puppies are]"?
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Dirt Roads on May 10, 2022, 08:36:25 PM
Can I help you. 


I find it old and sending out a signal to you the shopper, that they are going to con you into a sale.


Then good ole Murthy’s law. When you do need help the sales people are nowhere in sight, and if you find a sales person or associate, they turn out to be another shopper dressed professional to the store’s uniform policy.

I must resemble that a lot.  Folks used to come up to me and ask for help in hardware stores, Radio Shacks, home improvement stores and garden shops.  Back then, I would be wearing dress suspenders* (or sometimes braces*) on business days, but my attire didn't seem to matter.  (On certain cold days I'd be wearing a English driving hat and look a lot like the old Dave Lennox mascot).  At some point, someone came up and started staring at me, not quite sure if I was an employee.  I accidentally blurted out "May I help you".  I sheepishly admitted that I'd been getting roped into this a lot, and that even though I technically never worked in a hardware store, I did work for our local hardware store doing annual inventory while in high school.  At one point, I even got approached in an electrical supply store (where I was truly in my element).

Once I got old enough that I had to pull out reading glasses, this all came to an end.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: thspfc on May 10, 2022, 08:37:19 PM
“Not a _______ but”

Means one of two things: 1) the following comment is not worth listening to, or 2) the person speaking is so obsessed with something (most often a sports team) that they can’t go one sentence without letting you know about it.
You mean like "I'm no fan of puppies, but [several paragraphs about how awesome puppies are]"?
That too.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: formulanone on May 10, 2022, 08:40:35 PM
“No offense but”

It's a linguistic shock absorber.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: abefroman329 on May 10, 2022, 08:59:19 PM
Did you find everything you were looking for OK?

Well, I didn't see any drinking straws other than the store brand.  I don't know if the PfangleLife brand is just out of stock, or if you stopped carrying them, or what.

Hmm, yeah, I'm not sure.


Huh?  Don't you care that I didn't find everything I was looking for?  Don't even bother asking me if you're not prepared do something about a No answer.
Like any red-blooded American, I just respond "yes" even when I couldn't find something I was looking for.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 10, 2022, 09:10:26 PM



Saying "Hello" instead of getting to the point when pinging someone on Teams.

Yes to this one! I have a friend that'll often just write "Yo" in a message and wait for me to respond before elaborating. I find it pretty annoying.

I would so totally not respond to that.

For a long time I would answer the phone with “go” or “go ahead.”  Most people just aren’t prepared to just drop right into what they need to say, they want to dance around it for awhile.  I prefer just getting to the point, much to the annoyance of people I worked with and my wife (the latter is why I toned it down).

But I'm guessing you don't call someone else and just say "Go".  That would be the analogous conversation starter.

My grandpa used to do something similar to that, actually, and it would drive us nuts.  He'd call our house to chat, except he didn't quite have the conversation skills to initiate a casual phone conversation.  So the phone would ring, we'd see it was him on the caller ID and pick up the phone, and he'd say "Well, what do you know?" and then just expect the conversation to pick up from there.  We felt like saying, "I don't know, you're the one who called us, so what do you know?"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: jeffandnicole on May 10, 2022, 09:58:56 PM
...and Go!

As in a Facebook post on a local page:  "I'm looking for the best pizza in the town.  And Go!"

What...did you just enter me in some race?  Is "Please" and "Thank you" not in your vocabulary?  Never mind the question has been asked a zillion times.  And never mind that you're never actually going to tell us where you ultimately go.   We're not competing to tell you the best pizza place in record time.  And we know you're just going to wind up at Dominos anyway.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Ned Weasel on May 11, 2022, 07:25:50 AM
"Each and every."  "Each" and "every" mean the same thing.

"There's something to be said for...."  Oh yeah?  You say there's something to be said?  Then fucking say it already!
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Scott5114 on May 11, 2022, 07:42:44 AM
"Each and every."  "Each" and "every" mean the same thing.

When I worked at a casino, the lady that ran the giveways would always give the last warning before a patron's 5 minutes was up to claim their prize as the "last and final call." "This is the last and final call for Ned Weasel. Ned Weasel, please report to the promotions booth to claim your prize...Ned Weasel, last and final call." I asked her once if it was possible to have a last call without it also being a final call. She said it just sounded better that way.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: 1 on May 11, 2022, 07:47:03 AM
In some situations (not this one), "last" can be ambiguous, as it can also mean "previous". However, even in those situations, "final" should be enough.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: jeffandnicole on May 11, 2022, 09:05:19 AM
"Each and every."  "Each" and "every" mean the same thing.

When I worked at a casino, the lady that ran the giveways would always give the last warning before a patron's 5 minutes was up to claim their prize as the "last and final call." "This is the last and final call for Ned Weasel. Ned Weasel, please report to the promotions booth to claim your prize...Ned Weasel, last and final call." I asked her once if it was possible to have a last call without it also being a final call. She said it just sounded better that way.

Since she said it twice, the first last and final wasn't the last and final last and final.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: 7/8 on May 11, 2022, 09:09:34 AM
I have a friend that'll often just write "Yo" in a message and wait for me to respond before elaborating. I find it pretty annoying.
I responded  ...Yo Ma to that.  He was not amused with that.

That's a good one! It'd be funny in my case since this friend listens to Yo Yo Ma. :)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: hbelkins on May 11, 2022, 01:02:35 PM
"8 a.m. in the morning."

It's either 8 a.m. or 8 in the the morning. Doesn't need to be both.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: GaryV on May 11, 2022, 01:37:09 PM
Bringing it into the AARoads arena:

"Except on Green Arrow" - not needed on a No Turn On Red sign.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 11, 2022, 01:46:00 PM
Any road sign variation of "strictly enforced".

Just strictly enforce the speed limit or stoplight or whatever—no need to erect a sign to that effect.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: hbelkins on May 11, 2022, 06:37:28 PM
"US federal route"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: NWI_Irish96 on May 11, 2022, 06:38:45 PM
"My name is ___________ if you need anything."

OK, well what is your name if I don't need anything?
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: wanderer2575 on May 11, 2022, 07:14:23 PM
I can't believe the thread has gotten this far without someone asking "How are you?"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 11, 2022, 07:15:26 PM
I can't believe the thread has gotten this far without someone asking "How are you?"

The best response to actually tell someone how you feel.  They don’t really want to actually know usually and it’s amusing to make people uncomfortable.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: jeffandnicole on May 11, 2022, 07:33:05 PM
Bringing it into the AARoads arena:

"Except on Green Arrow" - not needed on a No Turn On Red sign.


Most signs related to movements at a traffic light are due to statute and legal definitions that may be non-existent or conflicting. The regulatory signage clarifies the permitted movement.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Dirt Roads on May 11, 2022, 09:34:44 PM
"US federal route"

Ouch!  That was a recurrent nightmare.

Quote from: CalRog.com
"Video of US Federal route XX now available at Team CalRog.com"

I believe that website is defunct.  I suspect that it went down in [flames].
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on May 11, 2022, 11:51:50 PM
Quote from: CalRog.com
"Video of US Federal route XX now available at Team CalRog.com"

I believe that website is defunct.  I suspect that it went down in [flames].

The Worldwide Transportation Library however is still online.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 11, 2022, 11:57:50 PM
"US federal route"

Ouch!  That was a recurrent nightmare.

Quote from: CalRog.com
"Video of US Federal route XX now available at Team CalRog.com"

I believe that website is defunct.  I suspect that it went down in [flames].

Along with the Little Green Shrub.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kkt on May 12, 2022, 02:36:01 AM
...and Go!

As in a Facebook post on a local page:  "I'm looking for the best pizza in the town.  And Go!"

What...did you just enter me in some race?  Is "Please" and "Thank you" not in your vocabulary?  Never mind the question has been asked a zillion times.  And never mind that you're never actually going to tell us where you ultimately go.   We're not competing to tell you the best pizza place in record time.  And we know you're just going to wind up at Dominos anyway.

"I don't know, I haven't eaten at every single pizza place in town."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: hbelkins on May 12, 2022, 01:03:35 PM
"US federal route"

Ouch!  That was a recurrent nightmare.

Quote from: CalRog.com
"Video of US Federal route XX now available at Team CalRog.com"

I believe that website is defunct.  I suspect that it went down in [flames].

Along with the Little Green Shrub.

The little green shrub is gone. I did a parody recreation of that video a few years ago when I was in E-town.

https://www.facebook.com/MillenniumHighway/videos/10153353017081469
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 12, 2022, 02:46:42 PM

I can't believe the thread has gotten this far without someone asking "How are you?"

The best response to actually tell someone how you feel.  They don’t really want to actually know usually and it’s amusing to make people uncomfortable.

You've probably encountered Christians who answer the question with "I'm blessed".  A assume they do so as a way of either (a) reminding themselves that their good fortune is a blessing from heaven, or (b) as a way to inoffensively identify themselves as a Christian.  I think the overlap is probably large with the group of people who say "Have a blessed day".  Anyway...

One lady in our church recently told me that she answers with "I'm blessed" when she's actually not doing very well.  She doesn't want to lie by saying "I'm fine" when she really isn't fine.  But there's also a good chance that either she or the person asking doesn't really want to talk about what's wrong.  And so, because she believes it's an objective fact that God has blessed her even if she can't discern exactly how at the moment, she has chosen "I'm blessed" as a way of technically not lying but still dodging a conversation she isn't keen to have.

So now, if I ask her how she's doing, and she says "I'm blessed", I respond with "Oh, what's the matter?"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 12, 2022, 02:52:26 PM

I can't believe the thread has gotten this far without someone asking "How are you?"

The best response to actually tell someone how you feel.  They don’t really want to actually know usually and it’s amusing to make people uncomfortable.

You've probably encountered Christians who answer the question with "I'm blessed".  A assume they do so as a way of either (a) reminding themselves that their good fortune is a blessing from heaven, or (b) as a way to inoffensively identify themselves as a Christian.  I think the overlap is probably large with the group of people who say "Have a blessed day".  Anyway...

One lady in our church recently told me that she answers with "I'm blessed" when she's actually not doing very well.  She doesn't want to lie by saying "I'm fine" when she really isn't fine.  But there's also a good chance that either she or the person asking doesn't really want to talk about what's wrong.  And so, because she believes it's an objective fact that God has blessed her even if she can't discern exactly how at the moment, she has chosen "I'm blessed" as a way of technically not lying but still dodging a conversation she isn't keen to have.

So now, if I ask her how she's doing, and she says "I'm blessed", I respond with "Oh, what's the matter?"

I might try that with my wife.  Saying “I’m blessed” would be so outside the norm for me that I’m curious to see how she would react to it.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 12, 2022, 03:06:30 PM
'Your call is important to us'

... on a recording, from a company whose hold time is always at least five minutes long.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: JoePCool14 on May 12, 2022, 04:04:13 PM
Hot take: This entire thread.

Phrases might not be needed per-say, but they are used because it just makes sense in certain situations. I'd like to see some of you never use common phrases like the ones you have suggested when you talk.

Maybe you should rename the thread to "Overused phrases that I don't like".

</rant>
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 12, 2022, 04:28:51 PM



I can't believe the thread has gotten this far without someone asking "How are you?"

The best response to actually tell someone how you feel.  They don’t really want to actually know usually and it’s amusing to make people uncomfortable.

You've probably encountered Christians who answer the question with "I'm blessed".  A assume they do so as a way of either (a) reminding themselves that their good fortune is a blessing from heaven, or (b) as a way to inoffensively identify themselves as a Christian.  I think the overlap is probably large with the group of people who say "Have a blessed day".  Anyway...

One lady in our church recently told me that she answers with "I'm blessed" when she's actually not doing very well.  She doesn't want to lie by saying "I'm fine" when she really isn't fine.  But there's also a good chance that either she or the person asking doesn't really want to talk about what's wrong.  And so, because she believes it's an objective fact that God has blessed her even if she can't discern exactly how at the moment, she has chosen "I'm blessed" as a way of technically not lying but still dodging a conversation she isn't keen to have.

So now, if I ask her how she's doing, and she says "I'm blessed", I respond with "Oh, what's the matter?"

I might try that with my wife.  Saying “I’m blessed” would be so outside the norm for me that I’m curious to see how she would react to it.

Heck, I'm "that type of person", but it would be so outside the norm for me too, that my wife would give me the hairy eyeball if I were to throw that one out.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: frankenroad on May 12, 2022, 04:43:15 PM
When a call is “parked” instead of “on hold”.

I always thought parking a call was a different process than just placing on hold.  More like putting it in a transfer portal where it can be picked up at any station, and not just the intended recipient’s station.  I know, that sounds a lot like hold, but I’m pretty sure it’s different.

This is how it worked at my last place of employment.  Calls on hold could only be picked up at the phone where they were placed on hold.  Parked calls could potentially be picked up anywhere in the building.  I think you had to use some kind of code to pick up the parked call, but I don't remember exactly how it worked, but parked and held calls were definitely different.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SectorZ on May 12, 2022, 06:18:48 PM
When a call is “parked” instead of “on hold”.

I always thought parking a call was a different process than just placing on hold.  More like putting it in a transfer portal where it can be picked up at any station, and not just the intended recipient’s station.  I know, that sounds a lot like hold, but I’m pretty sure it’s different.

This is how it worked at my last place of employment.  Calls on hold could only be picked up at the phone where they were placed on hold.  Parked calls could potentially be picked up anywhere in the building.  I think you had to use some kind of code to pick up the parked call, but I don't remember exactly how it worked, but parked and held calls were definitely different.

I knew that difference to be the same, except my last place of employment used "queued" or "in queue" instead of parked.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: wxfree on May 12, 2022, 07:49:01 PM
“No offense but”

If it’s offensive then it’s offensive. If it’s not then it’s not.

It is what it is.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: TheHighwayMan394 on May 12, 2022, 11:17:45 PM
“No offense but”

If it’s offensive then it’s offensive. If it’s not then it’s not.

"It's not personal." Yes, it is, or it's at least a problem that specifically needs to be addressed because of you, may not apply to someone else in the same situation, and may permanently affect my views of you.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: hbelkins on May 13, 2022, 11:13:12 AM
Hot take: This entire thread.

Phrases might not be needed per-say, but they are used because it just makes sense in certain situations. I'd like to see some of you never use common phrases like the ones you have suggested when you talk.

Maybe you should rename the thread to "Overused phrases that I don't like".

</rant>

Actually, I think a better title might be "redundant phrases" or "phrases that add nothing to the conversation."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: formulanone on May 13, 2022, 11:17:35 AM
Ending a phrase/word/adjective with AF ("as fuck").

It doesn't add anything to the description.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 13, 2022, 11:25:24 AM
Ending a phrase/word/adjective with AF ("as fuck").

It doesn't add anything to the description.

wanted to make a qualitative comparison, not intelligent enough to think of one.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kkt on May 13, 2022, 03:06:20 PM
Ending a phrase/word/adjective with AF ("as fuck").

It doesn't add anything to the description.

"as fuck" is an intensifier, like "very"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: 1 on May 13, 2022, 03:08:27 PM
It's an expletive in the literal sense of the term. (An expletive, by definition, doesn't change the meaning of the sentence.)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: formulanone on May 13, 2022, 05:29:18 PM
Ending a phrase/word/adjective with AF ("as fuck").

It doesn't add anything to the description.

"as fuck" is an intensifier, like "very"


That might be the case if one didn't encounter it multiple times a day.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 13, 2022, 05:57:04 PM

Ending a phrase/word/adjective with AF ("as fuck").

It doesn't add anything to the description.

wanted to make a qualitative comparison, not intelligent enough to think of one.


Ending a phrase/word/adjective with AF ("as fuck").

It doesn't add anything to the description.

"as fuck" is an intensifier, like "very"

wanted to use an intensifier, not literate enough to come up with exceptionally or astoundingly or very or remarkably or ridiculously or super or extraordinarily, so just tacked AF on the end instead.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 13, 2022, 09:42:26 PM
____ and other _____

as in "Alcohol and other drugs" - what's so important about Alcohol that you have to explicitly call it out????

Kwik Trip's overhead tobbaco shelf has a sign on it that says "Tobacco, beer and alcohol - we ID all three"  --What's the third????

____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 13, 2022, 09:46:32 PM
Also - We did have this conversation, didn't we??
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Rothman on May 13, 2022, 10:46:20 PM



____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

NEVER.

Heck, in each NYSDOT Region, there is an Operations Engineer.  Never just calling it mowing. :D
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 14, 2022, 05:18:17 AM



____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

NEVER.

Heck, in each NYSDOT Region, there is an Operations Engineer.  Never just calling it mowing. :D
It's word fluff.  Why tack it on?
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Rothman on May 14, 2022, 02:02:43 PM



____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

NEVER.

Heck, in each NYSDOT Region, there is an Operations Engineer.  Never just calling it mowing. :D
It's word fluff.  Why tack it on?
Grammar operations.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: skluth on May 14, 2022, 02:43:42 PM
Hot take: This entire thread.

Phrases might not be needed per-say, but they are used because it just makes sense in certain situations. I'd like to see some of you never use common phrases like the ones you have suggested when you talk.

Maybe you should rename the thread to "Overused phrases that I don't like".

</rant>

Actually, I think a better title might be "redundant phrases" or "phrases that add nothing to the conversation."

That's basically the same as the thread title
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 14, 2022, 03:03:55 PM



____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

NEVER.

Heck, in each NYSDOT Region, there is an Operations Engineer.  Never just calling it mowing. :D
It's word fluff.  Why tack it on?
Grammar operations.
Guess we have fucking operations going on here. ;)

Excuse me, I have to conduct pissing operations, be right back. :P
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Big John on May 14, 2022, 04:06:14 PM
Doing pooing operations.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 14, 2022, 07:47:45 PM
Doing pooing operations.
Because Pooing operations are cool.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: hbelkins on May 14, 2022, 08:15:11 PM
____ and other _____

as in "Alcohol and other drugs" - what's so important about Alcohol that you have to explicitly call it out????

Kwik Trip's overhead tobbaco shelf has a sign on it that says "Tobacco, beer and alcohol - we ID all three"  --What's the third????

____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

1.) Alcohol is legal. Other drugs, for the most part, aren't.

2.) Many states give separate licenses for the sale of beer and other alcoholic beverages (liquor).

3.) I encounter this one just about every day in other district PIOs' press releases. I try to avoid using the term. It's infuriating to me as a former newspaper editor who tries to use AP style whenever possible. "Cross drain operations scheduled for KY 7373." Uh, no. How about "cross drain replacement" or "cross drain repairs?" Describe the work to be done. And even then, the fact that "operations" are scheduled isn't the most important part of the release. "KY 7373 to be closed for cross drain replacement" is more appropriate. It tells the drivers what they need to know in case they plan to use KY 7373 the date of the operations.  :-D




____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

NEVER.

Heck, in each NYSDOT Region, there is an Operations Engineer.  Never just calling it mowing. :D

When I first started, there was an Operations Branch in each district. In this case, "operations" meant "maintenance" and everything related to the actual crews that work on the road was lumped into that branch except signs and signals, which were considered "Traffic."

There's been a reorganization and we no longer have "operations" or "pre-construction" or "construction." We have "Project Delivery and Preservation," which is both maintenance and construction inspection folded into one branch. PD&P is itself a bit wordy and not very self-explanatory. "Pre-construction" is now "Project Development," which actually makes more sense from a literary standpoint. And then there is "Engineering Support" which includes equipment, permits, roadside development (agronomy) signs, and signals.

But yes, I hate the term "operations" as a substitute for "maintenance" or "repairs."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kkt on May 14, 2022, 09:19:54 PM



____ operations - a favorite government saying - Mowing operations, Paving operations, etc.  drop the unnecessary word PLEASE AF!

NEVER.

Heck, in each NYSDOT Region, there is an Operations Engineer.  Never just calling it mowing. :D
It's word fluff.  Why tack it on?
Grammar operations.
Guess we have fucking operations going on here. ;)

Excuse me, I have to conduct pissing operations, be right back. :P

 :cheers:
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: -- US 175 -- on May 15, 2022, 06:41:56 AM
"Going forward" was a *very* overused phrase/crutch spoken in recent years by mainly business types, both in interviews and press releases, to transition to a description of what they and/or their business are about to do in the near future or a long-term scenario.  From what I can tell, it looks like many who were stuck to that phrase may have started to find other ways to express themselves.  I don't hear the phrase near as often now, thankfully.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: 1995hoo on May 15, 2022, 05:57:50 PM
A phrase that has been used in this thread that is not needed: "per say" (the correct words are "per se").



"Each and every."  "Each" and "every" mean the same thing.

….

Amen to that. I once saw a set of discovery requests in which an attorney threw in a definition that said " 'each' means 'each and every' " and " 'any' means 'any and all,' " I guess because he was afraid attorneys are so used to the unnecessary redundant versions that they might think he somehow meant something other than what they’re used to.



For a long time I would answer the phone with “go” or “go ahead.”  Most people just aren’t prepared to just drop right into what they need to say, they want to dance around it for awhile.  I prefer just getting to the point, much to the annoyance of people I worked with and my wife (the latter is why I toned it down).

For several years in the era before caller ID, my father used to answer his direct work phone by saying simply "uh-huh." He felt he didn’t need to say more because only immediate colleagues and immediate family had that number. One day, however, I called and he said his name. I asked what happened and he asked what I meant; I replied, "For years you’ve always just said 'uh-huh' when you answer."

Turned out some lady called the wrong number and when he answered like that, there was a long pause before she said, "Uh-HUH!!!!" and hung up. If you recall the Diet Pepsi ads with Ray Charles singing, "You’ve got the right one, baby, uh-HUH!," that’s how he made it sound like she said it.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: oscar on May 15, 2022, 06:29:00 PM
Amen to that. I once saw a set of discovery requests in which an attorney threw in a definition that said " 'each' means 'each and every' " and " 'any' means 'any and all,' " I guess because he was afraid attorneys are so used to the unnecessary redundant versions that they might think he somehow meant something other than what they’re used to.

Which might be related to other redundant legal phrases (like "cease and desist"), originating in the old English courts which were bilingual in the years following the Norman Conquest.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 20, 2022, 10:11:13 PM
When you talk about roads and traffic - using "eastbound and westbound" and "northbound and southbound" - from the department of redundancy department (another one)

also - instead of low-to-mid you have "mid-to-low."  Da hell is this accent.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: webny99 on May 21, 2022, 03:19:43 PM
"What's up?"

Sort of like "how are you?" but much worse IMO. It was a greeting I hated growing up because I never really knew how to respond to it in a way that didn't sound tacky. I still dislike it, but now I'll usually just respond with "hey, how's it going?" or something. That way both parties have asked a question and not gotten an answer, so we're at least on level playing field.  :D
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Big John on May 21, 2022, 03:25:19 PM
^^ "The sky"
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Scott5114 on May 21, 2022, 06:22:11 PM
When you talk about roads and traffic - using "eastbound and westbound" and "northbound and southbound" - from the department of redundancy department (another one)

Depending on the context, that can be clarifying. "There's a traffic jam on eastbound and westbound I-40 at Council Road" indicates that it affects both carriageways—"there's a traffic jam on I-40 at Council Road" could mean that it's eastbound only, or westbound only, or both.

"What's up?"

Sort of like "how are you?" but much worse IMO. It was a greeting I hated growing up because I never really knew how to respond to it in a way that didn't sound tacky.

"Not much, what's up with you?"

It's not a substitute for "how are you", it's a condensing of "what have you been up to?" If you like, you can respond with a short summary of what you are/have been doing rather than skipping past it with "not much".
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: skluth on May 21, 2022, 06:23:13 PM
What's up?

The moon, beautiful
The sun, even more beautiful
Oh yeah!
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 23, 2022, 02:39:23 PM
"What's up?"

Me —    Stuff.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: webny99 on May 23, 2022, 04:11:24 PM
"What's up?"

Sort of like "how are you?" but much worse IMO. It was a greeting I hated growing up because I never really knew how to respond to it in a way that didn't sound tacky.

"Not much, what's up with you?"

It's not a substitute for "how are you", it's a condensing of "what have you been up to?" If you like, you can respond with a short summary of what you are/have been doing rather than skipping past it with "not much".

In my experience it often is used as a substitute for "how are you" even if that's not how it's meant to be used.

And yeah, I'll respond that way now, but when I was younger I lacked the confidence to turn it back on the other person. (That sounds really silly when I say it like that, but it's true nonetheless!)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: 1995hoo on May 23, 2022, 04:36:08 PM
The word “like” when used as a filler. Our 16-year-old niece rode with us from Fort Myers to Broward County today and we discovered she has picked up the very annoying teenage girl habit of using “like” every three words or so. She may have used it six times in one sentence at one point. Ugh. I’m not sure which is worse, “like” or pro athletes who throw “you know” in with roughly the same frequency.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Scott5114 on May 23, 2022, 06:13:03 PM
The word “like” when used as a filler. Our 16-year-old niece rode with us from Fort Myers to Broward County today and we discovered she has picked up the very annoying teenage girl habit of using “like” every three words or so. She may have used it six times in one sentence at one point. Ugh. I’m not sure which is worse, “like” or pro athletes who throw “you know” in with roughly the same frequency.

Now if you got her into roadgeeking, her posts on this forum would look like this.
(https://www.aaroads.com/hi/001/i-h001_eb_exit_020a_06.jpg)

(yes I know that's not how it's pronounced)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 23, 2022, 06:20:04 PM
The word “like” when used as a filler. Our 16-year-old niece rode with us from Fort Myers to Broward County today and we discovered she has picked up the very annoying teenage girl habit of using “like” every three words or so. She may have used it six times in one sentence at one point. Ugh. I’m not sure which is worse, “like” or pro athletes who throw “you know” in with roughly the same frequency.

Now if you got her into roadgeeking, her posts on this forum would look like this.
(https://www.aaroads.com/hi/001/i-h001_eb_exit_020a_06.jpg)

(yes I know that's not how it's pronounced)

Probably says something about me that I just mentally envision the monster from the Zelda franchise that eats shields every time a picture or mention of “Likelike Highway” comes up. 
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Scott5114 on May 23, 2022, 06:22:10 PM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh". I had a supervisor who used "considering", which was notable considering how long it is. Arkansas gubernatorial candidate and former Trump press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was mocked for her heavy use of "look", and most every Ronald Reagan impersonation includes "well" at the start of every third sentence or so.

Whenever I create a new fictional character, I always make it a point to establish what their filler word is, since it helps make their dialogue feel more consistent.

Probably says something about me that I just mentally envision the monster from the Zelda franchise that eats shields every time a picture or mention of “Likelike Highway” comes up. 

Hmmm...Is there any notable lack of HI-63 shields along the road? You may be onto something...
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Big John on May 23, 2022, 06:23:34 PM
Overuse of "like" dates back to the 1980s with Valley Girl.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: abefroman329 on May 23, 2022, 06:46:49 PM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh". I had a supervisor who used "considering", which was notable considering how long it is. Arkansas gubernatorial candidate and former Trump press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was mocked for her heavy use of "look", and most every Ronald Reagan impersonation includes "well" at the start of every third sentence or so.
Sarah Palin had "also, too."  "Look" seems popular amongst politicians and politicos.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Takumi on May 23, 2022, 08:18:40 PM
Many Gen Z folks, within the past year or so, have started adding a superfluous “not” at the beginning of sentences. An example I heard today was from a coworker, who said “not me throwing up in my boyfriend’s car”.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Scott5114 on May 23, 2022, 08:47:03 PM
Many Gen Z folks, within the past year or so, have started adding a superfluous “not” at the beginning of sentences. An example I heard today was from a coworker, who said “not me throwing up in my boyfriend’s car”.

I don't know that it's necessarily superfluous as it is a way of facetiously pretending they're not the subject of the sentence. The millennial equivalent is appending "asking for a friend" to an embarrassing question.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Takumi on May 23, 2022, 11:32:16 PM
Many Gen Z folks, within the past year or so, have started adding a superfluous “not” at the beginning of sentences. An example I heard today was from a coworker, who said “not me throwing up in my boyfriend’s car”.

I don't know that it's necessarily superfluous as it is a way of facetiously pretending they're not the subject of the sentence. The millennial equivalent is appending "asking for a friend" to an embarrassing question.

Eh, I might have phrased that poorly, because I’ve also heard it applied to other people who are just going about their day normally. Regardless, I find it an unneeded phrase. (Now if you’ll excuse me, I see some clouds that need yelling at.)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: kphoger on May 24, 2022, 09:00:40 AM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh".

The Mexican equivalent to 'umm' is 'este', which literally means (adjectival) 'this'.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: hbelkins on May 24, 2022, 11:57:38 AM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh". I had a supervisor who used "considering", which was notable considering how long it is. Arkansas gubernatorial candidate and former Trump press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was mocked for her heavy use of "look", and most every Ronald Reagan impersonation includes "well" at the start of every third sentence or so.

I never had a voice and articulation class while in college, although I probably would have benefited from one given the number of broadcast media interviews I've done over the years. But I'm always aware of those things and make a conscious effort not to use them, especially on camera or in front of a microphone.

My boss uses "know what I mean" in this manner, quite frequently.

I went to high school with someone whose go-to was "let's see," pronounced "it see."
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Takumi on May 24, 2022, 12:11:05 PM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh". I had a supervisor who used "considering", which was notable considering how long it is. Arkansas gubernatorial candidate and former Trump press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was mocked for her heavy use of "look", and most every Ronald Reagan impersonation includes "well" at the start of every third sentence or so.
I used to work with a guy whose filler word was “fuckin’”, with the second syllable always being particularly drawn out. I’d go out to look at a car he was working on, and he’d just randomly throw it in the middle of sentences, like “the tire’s showing some uneven wear, fuckiiiiin’, but I can’t do an alignment on it because the tie rod is bent, so fuckiiiiiin’, it needs a tie rod too.”
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: Max Rockatansky on May 24, 2022, 01:13:59 PM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh". I had a supervisor who used "considering", which was notable considering how long it is. Arkansas gubernatorial candidate and former Trump press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was mocked for her heavy use of "look", and most every Ronald Reagan impersonation includes "well" at the start of every third sentence or so.
I used to work with a guy whose filler word was “fuckin’”, with the second syllable always being particularly drawn out. I’d go out to look at a car he was working on, and he’d just randomly throw it in the middle of sentences, like “the tire’s showing some uneven wear, fuckiiiiin’, but I can’t do an alignment on it because the tie rod is bent, so fuckiiiiiin’, it needs a tie rod too.”

I’ve had an issue over much of my adult life using swear words for filler.  It used to be fairly common amongst my line of work and I kind of inherited for a time.  Fortunately in a professional setting I’ve always been able to filter it as needed depending on who I was speaking to.
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: SSOWorld on May 25, 2022, 09:22:37 PM
I actually find what filler word people gravitate to a fascinating little personality quirk. Especially if they're more unusual ones beyond "like" and "um/uh".

The Mexican equivalent to 'umm' is 'este', which literally means (adjectival) 'this'.
The uhh fact that you use such things in sentences is that well, uhh interesting. the word "like" is, uhh a common word in, uhh zoomer talk, uhh or even, uhh millennial talk. You don't, uhh like that? well then, uhh ok boomer. (Jeff, uhh Goldblum)
Title: Re: Phrases that are not needed
Post by: frankenroad on June 13, 2022, 03:56:15 PM

My boss uses "know what I mean" in this manner, quite frequently.


One of my bosses uses "know what I'm sayin'" the same way.  Fortunately, I usually do.