Which state has the highest number of non-Interstate freeways?

Started by Poiponen13, September 23, 2023, 09:22:10 AM

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bing101

Richmond Parkway in the Pinole area has an expressway segment that is not done by Caltrans though. Note at one point was proposed to be CA-93.



webny99

Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 06:55:48 AM
A summary of the thread is impossible to compile?  Baloney.  Just would take someone time to gather the responses so far.

TM would be easier to compile, more scalable, provide the most accurate and greatest breadth of data, and would be live and more-or-less permanently available.


But alrighty then. Just don't forget all the states no one has answered for yet.


Rothman

Quote from: webny99 on September 25, 2023, 08:18:24 AM
Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 06:55:48 AM
A summary of the thread is impossible to compile?  Baloney.  Just would take someone time to gather the responses so far.

TM would be easier to compile, more scalable, provide the most accurate and greatest breadth of data, and would be live and more-or-less permanently available.


But alrighty then. Just don't forget all the states no one has answered for yet.
That's getting back to my actual point.  Despite the flailings in this thread, when it comes to actually answering the question, no one is really doing so.

Just a hodgepodge, incomplete set of partial answers.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

hotdogPi

Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 10:47:49 AM
Quote from: webny99 on September 25, 2023, 08:18:24 AM
Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 06:55:48 AM
A summary of the thread is impossible to compile?  Baloney.  Just would take someone time to gather the responses so far.

TM would be easier to compile, more scalable, provide the most accurate and greatest breadth of data, and would be live and more-or-less permanently available.


But alrighty then. Just don't forget all the states no one has answered for yet.
That's getting back to my actual point.  Despite the flailings in this thread, when it comes to actually answering the question, no one is really doing so.

Just a hodgepodge, incomplete set of partial answers.

Reply #8 lists 75 for California. Can any state beat that?
Clinched

Traveled, plus 13, 44, and 50, and several state routes

New:
I-189 clinched
US 7, VT 2A, 11, 15,  17, 73, 103, 116, 125, NH 123 traveled

Hobart

Quote from: Revive 755 on September 23, 2023, 10:18:58 PM
Quote from: Poiponen13 on September 23, 2023, 09:22:10 AM
Also, are there any states that do not number exits on such freeways?

I think numbering exits on non-interstate freeways seems to be the exception in most states.  Iowa is the only state I am aware of that consistently numbers the exits for almost all freeway segments.

As for listing other states:

Illinois

Full Freeway
* IL 6 (has exit numbers)
* IL 255 (has exit numbers)
* IL 390 (has exit numbers)

Freeway segments
* US 20 around Rockford and again around Freeport (no exit numbers)
* US 34 around Galesburg (no exit numbers)
* US 41, multiple segments in Chicagoland (no exit numbers)
* US 50 near the Indiana border (no exit numbers)
* US 51 south of I-72 in the Decatur area (no exit numbers)
* US 67 around Jacksonville (no exit numbers)
* IL 38 (no exit numbers)
* IL 53 (no exit numbers)
* IL 83 (no exit numbers)
* IL 92 in Moline (no exit numbers)
* IL 137/the Amstutz in Waukegan (no exit numbers)
* IL 336 Super-2 segment around Macomb) (no exit numbers)
* IL 394 (no exit numbers)

I would add a few to this list, mostly shorter and substandard examples:

  • IL-171 has a short freeway segment between I-55 and 44th Place
  • IL-56 has a short freeway segment near Prestbury, acting as an I-88 spur
  • IL-15 is in a weird limbo state of being half-grade separated in the St. Louis area; south of Belleville it does have a sequence of multiple exits without an at-grade intersection, making it a freeway in this section only.
  • IL-116 is a short, very substandard freeway on the eastern approach to the Cedar Street Bridge in East Peoria.
  • US-45 has a short, freeway-like segment between I-55 and I-294
  • Stoney Island Avenue is a arguably a short freeway spur of the Bishop Ford south of 95th street, having interchanges with the Bishop Ford and 103rd.
  • Depending on how many straws you grasp at, the McCluggage Bridge in Peoria and the interchanges at each end form a freeway for about a mile.
This is my signature. There are many like it, but this one is mine.

JayhawkCO

Quote from: jlam on September 24, 2023, 12:27:29 AM
Here is a non-exhaustive list for Colorado:

  • US 6, 6th Avenue Freeway (10 miles)
  • US 24 in Colorado Springs (2 miles)
  • US 36, Denver-Boulder Turnpike (20 miles)
  • US 285 in Denver (11 miles)
  • CO 21, Powers Boulevard (6 miles)
  • CO 47, César Chávez Memorial Highway (3 miles)
  • CO 58, Golden Freeway (5 miles)
  • CO 115 at Fort Carson (3 miles)
  • CO 470 (27 miles)
  • E-470 (47 miles)
  • Northwest Parkway (8 miles)
  • Peña Boulevard (11 miles)
  • South Academy Boulevard I-25 to MEP Pkwy (2 miles)
Of course, short limited-access segments and glorified ramps were not included.

The only freeways on this list with exit numbers are the 470 loop, CO 21, and the spurs into Golden and DIA. Powers Boulevard is strange because its exit numbers run parallel to I-25's. The plan might be to reroute I-25 around the city.

On this note, for the thread, how are we defining "freeway"? Two consecutive exits without any open access in between?

For Colorado, is CO83 a Freeway when there are exits for Hampden Avenue, Vaughn Way/Dam Rd, and I-225?


TheHighwayMan3561

Quote from: DandyDan on September 23, 2023, 10:29:32 PM
Quote from: TheHighwayMan394 on September 23, 2023, 05:54:25 PM
MN (doesn't count any Interstate duplexes):

Entirely:
TH 77, TH 100, TH 610

Mostly:
TH 36, TH 62, TH 101, TH 280

Significant freeway segments:
US 10, US 12, US 14, US 52, US 61, US 169, US 212, TH 5, TH 60

Scattered freeway-grade bypass sections:
US 2, US 71, TH 23

I don't count the US 63 Rochester bypass since that was a recent rerouting.
But shouldn't US 63 south of US 52 count as freeway? There's certainly some exits there.

There were more than a few I forgot, including that one, TH 15 from I-94 into downtown St. Cloud, and TH 371 from US 10 to Morrison CSAH 48, etc.
self-certified as the dumbest person on this board for 5 years running

gonealookin

Quote from: JayhawkCO on September 25, 2023, 12:31:24 PM
On this note, for the thread, how are we defining "freeway"? Two consecutive exits without any open access in between?

To get Wyoming even to one, I had to allow one grade separated-interchange plus one additional grade separation (the second grade separation being over there by "Wyoming Machinery Company", plus the crossing of the railroad line on an overpass.  The only reason I thought of it was that on Wyoming's official state highway map, it's shown as an "Interstate highway or other controlled access four-lane road" on the legend.  It does look like a short freeway, for what that's worth.




J N Winkler

Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 10:47:49 AMThat's getting back to my actual point.  Despite the flailings in this thread, when it comes to actually answering the question, no one is really doing so.

Just a hodgepodge, incomplete set of partial answers.

There are, AIUI, three questions in the OP:

*  Which state has the greatest centerline mileage of non-Interstate freeway?

*  Which state has the largest number of discrete segments of non-Interstate freeway?

*  How prevalent is exit numbering on these freeway segments?

All three require some form of cataloguing or list compilation for all fifty states (plus DC plus territories).  That takes a while to do.

Quote from: JayhawkCO on September 25, 2023, 12:31:24 PMOn this note, for the thread, how are we defining "freeway"? Two consecutive exits without any open access in between?

This is actually kind of a sticky question.  Two consecutive interchanges without any intermediate breaks in access control (such as driveways, flat intersections, etc.) is a useful way to exclude isolated grade separations.  However, it's conceptually possible to have a segment of roadway with full access control for miles and miles, then an interchange, and then full access control for more miles and miles.  (The US 54 Cunningham bypass in Kansas is one such.)  It would not be reasonable to exclude such a facility on grounds that it is an isolated grade separation.

This by no means exhausts the universe of possible edge cases--there are others based on the degree of access control provided.  There are also isolated grade separations (such as along US 75 in Sabetha, Kansas) that could plausibly be counted as short freeway segments since the roadway grades involved do not favor flat intersections that might otherwise be provided.

As for Colorado SH 83, I would count it as freeway, but only between Lehigh Avenue (last signal going north) and the ramps to and from I-225 northbound (first signal after access control ends going north).  This indeed leaves interchanges at Hampden Avenue and Vaughn Way/Dam Road, but the latter is marginal since it can be argued that the connection to northbound SH 83 is so substandard as to be a turn rather than a ramp.
"It is necessary to spend a hundred lire now to save a thousand lire later."--Piero Puricelli, explaining the need for a first-class road system to Benito Mussolini

hbelkins

Kentucky has long had exit numbers on its parkways, along with KY 4 (New Circle Road), KY 841 (Gene Snyder Freeway) and US 60 (Owensboro bypass). There are also exit numbers on the two exits along US 23 at either end of the Pikeville Cut-Through. However, there are no exit numbers for US 23's interchanges at US 460/KY 40 in Johnson County and KY 114 and KY 80/KY 302 in Floyd County.


Government would be tolerable if not for politicians and bureaucrats.

TheHighwayMan3561

Fleshing out MN...

US 2 (2): Bong Bridge, Bemidji bypass
US 8 (1): westerb terminus 1st mile
US 10 (3): St. Paul-Cottage Grove, Blaine-Anoka, Little Falls bypass
US 12 (1): I-494 to Orono (part of this is a super-2)
US 14 (2): Owatonna-Janesville and Mankato (does not include Rochester duplex)
US 52 (2 main segments): St. Paul-Coates, Rochester
US 53 (1): north of I-35 in Duluth (debatable)
US 61's entry overlaps with US 10
US 63 (1 independent): Rochester to Stewartville
US 71's entry overlaps with US 2
US 169 (7): Mankato, Le Sueur bypass, Belle Plaine bypass, Shakopee-Brooklyn Park, Elk River*, Princeton bypass, Milaca bypass
US 212 (1): Edina-Chaska

TH 5: airport freeway
TH 15: St. Cloud spur
TH 23 (2): Paynesville bypass, Willmar bypass
TH 36 (3): Roseville-Lake Elmo interrupted by the Century Ave stoplight; Oak Park Heights crossing area
TH 62 II (2): Eden Prairie-Mendota Heights, Inver Grove Heights
TH 65: unsigned southern stub
TH 77: all
TH 100: all
TH 101: Rogers-Elk River
TH 280: all going northbound
TH 371: Little Falls-Camp Ripley
TH 610: all

Total: 37 (whatever on the math)
self-certified as the dumbest person on this board for 5 years running

vdeane

Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 10:47:49 AM
Quote from: webny99 on September 25, 2023, 08:18:24 AM
Quote from: Rothman on September 25, 2023, 06:55:48 AM
A summary of the thread is impossible to compile?  Baloney.  Just would take someone time to gather the responses so far.

TM would be easier to compile, more scalable, provide the most accurate and greatest breadth of data, and would be live and more-or-less permanently available.


But alrighty then. Just don't forget all the states no one has answered for yet.
That's getting back to my actual point.  Despite the flailings in this thread, when it comes to actually answering the question, no one is really doing so.

Just a hodgepodge, incomplete set of partial answers.

Not to mention, TM isn't actually easier to compile.  For one thing, it doesn't even claim to have all freeways, not even in the US.  The Inner Loop wasn't there for a the longest time, and stuff like Suffolk CR 97 (if that counts, given the number of at-grades) still isn't.  So to make TM work, the data people there would need to precisely define "freeway" such that they could remove the "select" part of the "US Select Named Freeways" system, and then they would need to identify and draft everything that isn't in the system.  They would likely all do the same for all other countries with similar systems for the sake of consistently.  That would be a lot of work... so not quite analogous to the 6lane situation where it was (mostly) possible to do with the existing data/infrastructure.

If TM were to become involved, I would think it would ultimately involve the interstates too (even though that's everything except I-180) for consistency with regions that have a similar Tier 1 system that isn't all freeway (like every Canadian province that has one except for Ontario*).

*And even then, ON 420 is a thing.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

webny99

Quote from: vdeane on September 25, 2023, 08:58:33 PM
Not to mention, TM isn't actually easier to compile.  For one thing, it doesn't even claim to have all freeways, not even in the US.  The Inner Loop wasn't there for a the longest time, and stuff like Suffolk CR 97 (if that counts, given the number of at-grades) still isn't.  So to make TM work, the data people there would need to precisely define "freeway" such that they could remove the "select" part of the "US Select Named Freeways" system, and then they would need to identify and draft everything that isn't in the system.  They would likely all do the same for all other countries with similar systems for the sake of consistently.  That would be a lot of work... so not quite analogous to the 6lane situation where it was (mostly) possible to do with the existing data/infrastructure.

By easier to compile, my assumption was that multiple people would be involved, anyone could submit data for states if/when they're interested and have time, and that would be easier on balance than any one person trying to compile and update everything into a single source in this thread or elsewhere. I've spent my share of time editing tables and other long summary-type posts on this forum, and it gets very tedious.

I hadn't considered the fact that TM does not have all freeways, but it would have the vast majority, aside from a few odd county route exceptions, and those could potentially be added if they're long/significant, or just skipped for what it's worth.


Quote from: vdeane on September 25, 2023, 08:58:33 PM
If TM were to become involved, I would think it would ultimately involve the interstates too (even though that's everything except I-180) for consistency with regions that have a similar Tier 1 system that isn't all freeway (like every Canadian province that has one except for Ontario*).

*And even then, ON 420 is a thing.

Including interstates would defeat the entire purpose of the "non-interstate freeway" concept. It's unique to the US by definition, so other regions/countries wouldn't need to be included in the project.

vdeane

Quote from: webny99 on September 29, 2023, 12:11:09 PM
Including interstates would defeat the entire purpose of the "non-interstate freeway" concept. It's unique to the US by definition, so other regions/countries wouldn't need to be included in the project.
You can get all the non-interstate freeways by taking the set of all freeways and subtracting the set of freeways that are interstates.  Seems more versatile for me.
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

SkyPesos

Quote from: J N Winkler on September 25, 2023, 01:54:16 PM
Quote from: JayhawkCO on September 25, 2023, 12:31:24 PMOn this note, for the thread, how are we defining "freeway"? Two consecutive exits without any open access in between?

This is actually kind of a sticky question.  Two consecutive interchanges without any intermediate breaks in access control (such as driveways, flat intersections, etc.) is a useful way to exclude isolated grade separations.  However, it's conceptually possible to have a segment of roadway with full access control for miles and miles, then an interchange, and then full access control for more miles and miles.  (The US 54 Cunningham bypass in Kansas is one such.)  It would not be reasonable to exclude such a facility on grounds that it is an isolated grade separation.
Would this 3.6 mile long section of US 50 in eastern Cincinnati count as a freeway? It has no at-grade access in this portion, and two interchanges to OH 125/32/561 and Red Bank Rd, but both sides end at "stroads" (for the lack of a better term) in the "downtowns" of a neighborhood or suburb. And Google Maps doesn't mark it as a freeway (light orange vs a darker, bolded orange for freeways).

gonealookin

Quote from: gonealookin on September 23, 2023, 06:00:04 PM
Just a few in Nevada (with some approximate lengths):
...
SR 613, Summerlin Parkway (6 miles)
...
The exits on...SR 613 are not numbered; the rest of those freeways have numbered exits.

Updating this, since I'm here for PGA Tour at TPC Summerlin:  Since the last time I visited, the exits on SR 613 have been numbered.

Strider


Bickendan

Quote from: webny99 on September 29, 2023, 12:11:09 PM
Including interstates would defeat the entire purpose of the "non-interstate freeway" concept. It's unique to the US by definition, so other regions/countries wouldn't need to be included in the project.
However, there are countries that have very analogous systems to the US, India being one of them. The difference in this case trying to compile India's systems for TM is a massive chore given how sparsely things are actually signed -- not just the highways themselves (which will still have old NH route signage on the ground), but interchange signage. While Street View seems to be finally being implemented, likely by on the ground static photography instead of GMSVmobiles, it's proving that street signs aren't important for Indian life.
Furthermore, Google Maps and OSM don't agree very well on what's on the ground outside of the major cities, not to mention the actual routing of some of the highways.
But India does match the US in terms of system definition -- National Expressways are Interstates, National Highways are US Highways (and the dominant system), State Highways are, well, State Highways/Routes, and there are non-numbered or private highways.
As far as I can tell, however, there aren't any uniquely SH freeways; they're either private, named routes, or NH/NE numbered.

Outside of India, I'd think Spain would be the best European example, and that's one TM could theoretically track.

mapman1071

AZ State Routes Full Freeway

AZ 51 16.7mi
AZ Loop 101 60.99mi
AZ 143  3.93mi
AZ Loop 202 77.66mi
AZ Loop 303 35.25mi

partial freeway
US 60 27.54mi
AZ 24 1mi

Hybread Freeway/Expressway
AZ 210 3.96mi

webny99

Quote from: mapman1071 on December 03, 2023, 12:21:17 AM
AZ State Routes Full Freeway

...

On that note, I think AZ definitely wins "highest percentage of freeways that are non-interstate".

formulanone

#70
Going to try to compile a list for Texas. This may be a little inaccurate, since sometimes different numbered routes might form a single loop or bypass of a city, and sometimes they peel away in a different direction for an exit or two.

(Personally, I think 3+ exits counts as a freeway, but to each their own.)

El Paso: much of Loop 375, Spur 601, parts of US 54 (3)
Odessa/Midland: much of Loop 338, SH 191, Loop 250  (3)
Big Spring: US 87 (1)
Del Rio: Loop 79 (1)
San Angelo: Loop 306 with US 67/277 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Abilene: US 83/277 and Loop 322 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Wichita Falls: US 277, US 287, US 281 (3)
Henrietta: US 287 (1, barely)
Laredo: Loop 20 (1), TX 255
Brownsville: SH 550 (1)
Corpus Christi: SH 44, SH 358, SH 286, US 181 (4)
Victoria: US 77, US 59, Loop 463 (3, acting as 1 loop)
Sinton: US 77, SH 89 (2)
San Antonio: Loop 1604, US 281, SH 151, Wurzbach Parkway (4)
New Braunfels: Loop 337 (1)
Austin: SH 130, SH 45, Loop 1, US 183, US 290 (5); Loop 360 has some grade separations but driveway access points.
Taylor: US 79 (1)
Temple: Loop 363 et al (1)
Waco:  Loop 340, TX 6, Loop 484 (3)
DFW: Chisholm Trail, SHs 121, 114, 183, 360, 408, US 67, Loop 12, 161/PB/190, US 175, US 80, US 75, US 287, Spur 557 (14)
Tyler: TX 49 (1)
...

sprjus4

Quote from: SkyPesos on September 29, 2023, 01:10:20 PM
Quote from: J N Winkler on September 25, 2023, 01:54:16 PM
Quote from: JayhawkCO on September 25, 2023, 12:31:24 PMOn this note, for the thread, how are we defining "freeway"? Two consecutive exits without any open access in between?

This is actually kind of a sticky question.  Two consecutive interchanges without any intermediate breaks in access control (such as driveways, flat intersections, etc.) is a useful way to exclude isolated grade separations.  However, it's conceptually possible to have a segment of roadway with full access control for miles and miles, then an interchange, and then full access control for more miles and miles.  (The US 54 Cunningham bypass in Kansas is one such.)  It would not be reasonable to exclude such a facility on grounds that it is an isolated grade separation.
Would this 3.6 mile long section of US 50 in eastern Cincinnati count as a freeway? It has no at-grade access in this portion, and two interchanges to OH 125/32/561 and Red Bank Rd, but both sides end at "stroads" (for the lack of a better term) in the "downtowns" of a neighborhood or suburb. And Google Maps doesn't mark it as a freeway (light orange vs a darker, bolded orange for freeways).
I would say that easily counts as freeway, it's not even a doubt in my mind. 3+ miles long, has several grade separations and two interchanges.

-- US 175 --

Quote from: formulanone on December 04, 2023, 11:23:24 PM
Going to try to compile a list for Texas. This may be a little inaccurate, since sometimes different numbered routes might form a single loop or bypass of a city, and sometimes they peel away in a different direction for an exit or two.

(Personally, I think 3+ exits counts as a freeway, but to each their own.)

El Paso: much of Loop 375, Spur 601, parts of US 54 (3)
Odessa/Midland: much of Loop 338, SH 191, Loop 250  (3)
Big Spring: US 87 (1)
Del Rio: Loop 79 (1)
San Angelo: Loop 306 with US 67/277 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Abilene: US 83/277 and Loop 322 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Wichita Falls: US 277, US 287, US 281 (3)
Henrietta: US 287 (1, barely)
Laredo: Loop 20 (1), TX 255
Brownsville: SH 550 (1)
Corpus Christi: SH 44, SH 358, SH 286, US 181 (4)
Victoria: US 77, US 59, Loop 463 (3, acting as 1 loop)
Sinton: US 77, SH 89 (2)
San Antonio: Loop 1604, US 281, SH 151, Wurzbach Parkway (4)
New Braunfels: Loop 337 (1)
Austin: SH 130, SH 45, Loop 1, US 183, US 290 (5); Loop 360 has some grade separations but driveway access points.
Taylor: US 79 (1)
Temple: Loop 363 et al (1)
Waco:  Loop 340, TX 6, Loop 484 (3)
DFW: Chisholm Trail, SHs 121, 114, 183, 360, 408, US 67, Loop 12, 161/PB/190, US 175, US 80, US 75, US 287, Spur 557 (14) ùù
Tyler: TX 49 (1)
...

Loop 49 around Tyler (and later, Lindale) is a Super-2 with no dividing barrier of any kind.

sprjus4

Quote from: -- US 175 -- on February 03, 2024, 03:10:51 PM
Quote from: formulanone on December 04, 2023, 11:23:24 PM
Going to try to compile a list for Texas. This may be a little inaccurate, since sometimes different numbered routes might form a single loop or bypass of a city, and sometimes they peel away in a different direction for an exit or two.

(Personally, I think 3+ exits counts as a freeway, but to each their own.)

El Paso: much of Loop 375, Spur 601, parts of US 54 (3)
Odessa/Midland: much of Loop 338, SH 191, Loop 250  (3)
Big Spring: US 87 (1)
Del Rio: Loop 79 (1)
San Angelo: Loop 306 with US 67/277 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Abilene: US 83/277 and Loop 322 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Wichita Falls: US 277, US 287, US 281 (3)
Henrietta: US 287 (1, barely)
Laredo: Loop 20 (1), TX 255
Brownsville: SH 550 (1)
Corpus Christi: SH 44, SH 358, SH 286, US 181 (4)
Victoria: US 77, US 59, Loop 463 (3, acting as 1 loop)
Sinton: US 77, SH 89 (2)
San Antonio: Loop 1604, US 281, SH 151, Wurzbach Parkway (4)
New Braunfels: Loop 337 (1)
Austin: SH 130, SH 45, Loop 1, US 183, US 290 (5); Loop 360 has some grade separations but driveway access points.
Taylor: US 79 (1)
Temple: Loop 363 et al (1)
Waco:  Loop 340, TX 6, Loop 484 (3)
DFW: Chisholm Trail, SHs 121, 114, 183, 360, 408, US 67, Loop 12, 161/PB/190, US 175, US 80, US 75, US 287, Spur 557 (14) ùù
Tyler: TX 49 (1)
...

Loop 49 around Tyler (and later, Lindale) is a Super-2 with no dividing barrier of any kind.
It's still a freeway.

BJ59

Quote from: formulanone on December 04, 2023, 11:23:24 PM
Going to try to compile a list for Texas. This may be a little inaccurate, since sometimes different numbered routes might form a single loop or bypass of a city, and sometimes they peel away in a different direction for an exit or two.

(Personally, I think 3+ exits counts as a freeway, but to each their own.)

El Paso: much of Loop 375, Spur 601, parts of US 54 (3)
Odessa/Midland: much of Loop 338, SH 191, Loop 250  (3)
Big Spring: US 87 (1)
Del Rio: Loop 79 (1)
San Angelo: Loop 306 with US 67/277 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Abilene: US 83/277 and Loop 322 (2 routes, but effectively 1)
Wichita Falls: US 277, US 287, US 281 (3)
Henrietta: US 287 (1, barely)
Laredo: Loop 20 (1), TX 255
Brownsville: SH 550 (1)
Corpus Christi: SH 44, SH 358, SH 286, US 181 (4)
Victoria: US 77, US 59, Loop 463 (3, acting as 1 loop)
Sinton: US 77, SH 89 (2)
San Antonio: Loop 1604, US 281, SH 151, Wurzbach Parkway (4)
New Braunfels: Loop 337 (1)
Austin: SH 130, SH 45, Loop 1, US 183, US 290 (5); Loop 360 has some grade separations but driveway access points.
Taylor: US 79 (1)
Temple: Loop 363 et al (1)
Waco:  Loop 340, TX 6, Loop 484 (3)
DFW: Chisholm Trail, SHs 121, 114, 183, 360, 408, US 67, Loop 12, 161/PB/190, US 175, US 80, US 75, US 287, Spur 557 (14)
Tyler: TX 49 (1)
...

I would add SH-199 and DNT for the DFW metro. (+2) SH-170 will make the list soon once it is opened.

Don't forget US-90 for San Antonio either. (+1) If multiplexed routes count, then I would add SH-16 and US-87.

Austin: SH-71 (+1)

Houston: US-90, US-90 Alt, US-290, US-59, Beltway 8/Sam Houston Tollway, SH-99/Grand Parkway, HTR, SH-249, SH-225, SH-6, Westpark Tollway, Fort Bend Tollway, SH-288, SH-146, SH-330, FM-1764 (16)

Amarillo: US-287, US-87, Loop 335 (3)

Lubbock: US-82, US-87, US-62, Spur 327, Loop 289 (5)




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